Can you have too much Potassium? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-17-2005, 01:39 AM Thread Starter
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 82
Can you have too much Potassium?

Going through and researching water parameters, I get mixed feelings about this. Now honestly, is too much potassium bad for plants? When I say too much, I'm saying dosing more potassium than you would other things such as nitrates, and chelated iron.

I have some hair algae growth and reading through the articles here says to put more potassium...

Just recently started dosing with ferts thanks to our good friend Greg W. and have been trying to raise my nitrates up.

Water test 2 days ago
ph - 6.8
ammonia - 0 ppm
nitrites - 0 ppm
nitrates - 0ppm

today (after dosing potassium nitrate and potassium sulfate)
ph - 6.8
ammonia - 0 ppm
nitrites 0 ppm
nitrates 5 ppm

I don't have a test for potassium (that's why I'm asking) so I couln't tell you how much potassium I have in my tank right now.
speechless33759 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-17-2005, 01:54 AM
Planted Tank VIP
 
GulfCoastAquarian's Avatar
 
PTrader: (6/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Posts: 3,578
It is possible to have too much K, because it can block the uptake of Calcium at high concentrations.

- Sam P -
plantedtanker in limbo - all tanks currently in storage
GulfCoastAquarian is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-17-2005, 05:54 PM
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 2,165
too much potassium won't cause algae, but does cause calcium uptake problems.
I'd suggest after a water change, you dose about 15ppm of potassium. Then halfway to the next water change, dose another 5-10ppm

Just watch for calcium deficiencies...which is usually seen as new growth with curled up leaves.
malkore is offline  
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-17-2005, 11:25 PM
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: SE PA, USA
Posts: 194
Insufficient phosphates will also "cause" algae, because plants need it. It would be a good idea to check to see what level you have. Aim for about .5 ppm.

From what I've read, excessive potassium is rarely a problem and when it is, it has to be really excessive!

Good luck!

Bill
aquabillpers is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-18-2005, 01:24 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
Hypancistrus's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 1,032
You will find varying opinions, I've read that 20-50 ppm for a planted tank is "optimal," and I've read other opinions that nothing more than 2 ppm is "optimal." Since it can't really be accurately measured cheaply, I simply dose Seachem Potassium 3 times per week at the recommended dose. I do a 36% water change weekly.
Hypancistrus is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-18-2005, 04:29 PM
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 2,165
Hmmm, never heard anything over 20ppm for potassium, and I know a lot of poeple that don't go over 10 or 15ppm.

and yes, low phosphates will lead to nitrate induced algae blooms. This is why we refer to algae being caused by a nutrient imbalance, rather than something being too high.
malkore is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-18-2005, 08:45 PM
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: SE PA, USA
Posts: 194
What test kits are people using to measure potassium levels?

LaMotte used to offer one, but their web site no longer lists any. Some users of it reported that it was quite cumbersome to use, and they settled for a "enough" (white precipitate) or a "not enough" measurement.

A search of That Fish Place's site brought up almost 100 test kits, but none for potassium.

Bill
aquabillpers is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-19-2005, 04:49 PM
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 2,165
we don't test for potassium. you just estimate how much you'd need. after a 50% water change, most of your potassium will be gone...so dose 10-15ppm.
malkore is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-19-2005, 09:22 PM
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 139
Is there a web page somewhere that says that an excess in one fert results in the insufficient takeup of another???? Ive seen a few taht show deficiency signs, but none that say an excess in say pottassium leads to insufficient calcium uptake.
grungefreek is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome