Reducing nitrates - A new world - Page 2 - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #16 of 22 (permalink) Old 10-21-2020, 12:56 PM
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Are there any plant can help to reduce nitrates in the tank? can one help me?
Floating plants will help soak up excess nutrients from the water column. I'd suggest to find the culprit that is raising your nitrates first. Too much fish, overfeeding and not enough substrate vacuuming. Water changes will help cut it down.
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post #17 of 22 (permalink) Old 10-21-2020, 03:57 PM
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I have salvinia minima floating in all my tanks and struggle to get any consistent nitrate readings, so I'm fairly sure that it's these floaters that suck up all the nutrients from the water column. Not surprising given how fast they spread I guess, but they're easy enough to remove when needed.

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post #18 of 22 (permalink) Old 10-21-2020, 08:04 PM
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An over sized canister filter will usually have the opposite affect on nitrates... i.e. increasing them. A bigger canister will store more debris that will break down into nitrogen compounds. Cleaning a canister filter (any canister filter) more frequently is a good way to reduce nitrates by removing the debris BEFORE it has a chance to break down. Bigger canisters are usually harder to maintain (due to their size) so they are often maintained less frequently than small canisters or other types of filters (HOB).
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post #19 of 22 (permalink) Old 10-21-2020, 09:28 PM
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echoing others , my shrimp palace has duckweed and water lettuce plus a pothos plants roots dangling in it for good measure. I have no nitrates. I do have thriving amazon sword in there too though but as I've never cleaned the substrate it has had 2 years of shrimp dirt to feed on instead ...
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post #20 of 22 (permalink) Old 10-22-2020, 06:35 AM
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An over sized canister filter will usually have the opposite affect on nitrates... i.e. increasing them. A bigger canister will store more debris that will break down into nitrogen compounds. Cleaning a canister filter (any canister filter) more frequently is a good way to reduce nitrates by removing the debris BEFORE it has a chance to break down. Bigger canisters are usually harder to maintain (due to their size) so they are often maintained less frequently than small canisters or other types of filters (HOB).
But a bigger canister can't increase the nitrate, can it? Still the same amount of 'muck' in the tank so still the same amount of nitrate as an end result irrespective of whether the mulm breaks down in the tank or in the filter. Couldn't you equally argue that a well-maintained canister would help to reduce nitrates by trapping matter in the floss that is then discarded when the filter is cleaned, rather than breaking down in the a tank?

Guess it depends on how well the canister is maintained.... which reminds me, must get round to cleaning out that canister filter this weekend
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post #21 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-11-2020, 11:54 PM
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Filtered matter can be converted to nitrate NO3 or free atmospheric nitrogen N2. The converted NO3 goes to water. The converted N2 escapes to the atmosphere and by doing so it removes NO3 out of aquarium. The ratio between these two processes can be selected by the shape of the bio-media elements. Thinner walled elements like plastic sponges, plastic bio-balls and rings convert matter to NO3. Average size elements such as ceramic rings and small pumice convert to NO3 and little to N2. The third bio-media category are larger size porous ceramics, pumice and lava rock shapes over 1.5Ē large capable of converting matter mostly to N2.

When it comes to the actual application we need to balance fish producing nitrogen with plant mass nitrogen uptake. There are situations where high doses of NO3 are considered necessary for plants while not realizing that the doses are consumed by filtration and not by the plants. On the other hand, too much conversion to N2 can keep plants nitrogen deficient.


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post #22 of 22 (permalink) Old 11-18-2020, 04:56 AM
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I never recommend the floating plants like the duckweed. Stuff is awful, blocks all the light in the tank, and so hard to get rid of. I've found that a plant that grows out of the water works much better and plain looks better. Pothos or spider plants both work awesome. There are others. If you carefully transition you can get anubias to grow emersed too. My LGS has a whole row of shrimp tanks, and every single one has an emersed plant or two.
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