Reality of plants for lowering nitrates - The Planted Tank Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
Wannabe Guru
 
DavidZ's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NY,NY
Posts: 1,008
Reality of plants for lowering nitrates

Whats the reality of plants lowering nitrates, what would you need/what kind of plants?
Let say if you want to lower by 20points - going from 30 to 10
Yes the water changes work best.
This is a research based question.
DavidZ is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 05:46 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 12,048
Nitrate is plant "food" so most will use it. The fast growing types use it quicker. One of the reasons it can become necessary to add ferts is because the growing plants can use all the normally available and we need to add more if we want the full growth.
Kind of like having teenagers in the house. If we want full growth we have to keep the food on hand.
PlantedRich is offline  
post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 06:47 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
SwissCheeseHead's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 452
That's like asking how much mashed potatoes people can eat at an all you can eat buffet. It depends on a lot of factors, you would have to have controls on every parameter to gain any quantitative answer.

Love your tanks and they will love you back
SwissCheeseHead is offline  
 
post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 07:11 PM Thread Starter
Wannabe Guru
 
DavidZ's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NY,NY
Posts: 1,008
I am not looking to do another planted tank, just thinking of some floated plants.
I do know he whole system of feeding .... nitrates.
Looking for a general answer.
DavidZ is offline  
post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 07:19 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
SwissCheeseHead's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 452
If you're looking to do floating plants, then I would imagine that the surface area of the water would determine how many floating plants you can have, which would determine how much of a nitrate soak you can have. For example, a 20 gallon long would have a higher capacity to hold more floating plants than say a 20 gallon hex. it largely depends on your stocking levels, your water changes, your plants, high tech/low tech etc.

I guess what I'm trying to say is your question is too open ended with too many variables. You won't be able to get a good answer.

Love your tanks and they will love you back
SwissCheeseHead is offline  
post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
Wannabe Guru
 
DavidZ's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NY,NY
Posts: 1,008
I see your point, lets say a standard 55Gl with half way coverage, no CO2
DavidZ is offline  
post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 09:31 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
lksdrinker's Avatar
 
PTrader: (9/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: NY; LETS GO METS
Posts: 1,916
very confused as to what your question actually is? Are you doubting that plants consume nitrate? Are you asking how to lower nitrates from 30 to 10 ppm? How long are you willing to wait lol? You're not going to find some magic number as to how many plants will consume how much nitrogen. Far too many variables. size of the plant, what other nutrients it can absorb, lighting, etc etc etc.

Rich's Fishes
Curator of an ever growing fishroom that currently houses 30 different tanks. Most full of at least water....some even have fish!
lksdrinker is offline  
post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 11:04 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
Fishly's Avatar
 
PTrader: (7/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Alabama
Posts: 1,371
He's asking how much nitrate plants can remove if all other conditions are ideal. In this case, he's asking about floating plants (presumably to maximize access to light and CO2).

It's an interesting question. I myself got into live plants in the hope that they would reduce the need for water changes. I'm sure others have, too. It would be useful to know the upper limit of nitrate consumption for people who want to have lots of fish with fewer water changes.

Proud member of
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Fishly is offline  
post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2016, 11:49 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
AbbeysDad's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Central New York, USA
Posts: 1,340
'How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?'

<couldn't resist>

Tank On, Mike-
60g Marineland Community, Finnex Planted+ 24/7, Silica (pool filter) sand.
10g, 29g, & 37g fry grow out tanks, 110g stock tank.


What came first, the chicken or the egg. It was the egg, but not the egg from a chicken.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
AbbeysDad is offline  
post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 12:32 AM
Algae Grower
 
darklord's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Singapore
Posts: 101
I got into this sometimes ago, I would say riparium style planted tank reduced water change but best is aquaponics setup - you can get away with high bio load.

But with lack of nitrate floaters will slowly disappear and you would need rich loam or root tab to sustain the rooted aquatic plants.

Not sure whether anyone experienced the same thing.

It's like you wanted nice green and lush aquascape and love land plants. It's a really hard balancing act, which mother Nature does it with ease.

Sent from my HM NOTE 1LTE using Tapatalk
darklord is offline  
post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 12:39 AM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PlantedRich's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 12,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by darklord View Post
I got into this sometimes ago, I would say riparium style planted tank reduced water change but best is aquaponics setup - you can get away with high bio load.

But with lack of nitrate floaters will slowly disappear and you would need rich loam or root tab to sustain the rooted aquatic plants.

Not sure whether anyone experienced the same thing.

It's like you wanted nice green and lush aquascape and love land plants. It's a really hard balancing act, which mother Nature does it with ease.

Sent from my HM NOTE 1LTE using Tapatalk
Mother nature does it with ease because she is quite willing to let mass numbers of plants and animals die or even go extinct which most of us are not willing/prepared to do. We try to have a grand plan of action where nature just simply lets it go and those who survive are left.
PlantedRich is offline  
post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 02:01 AM Thread Starter
Wannabe Guru
 
DavidZ's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: NY,NY
Posts: 1,008
Fishly is on the money, very interesting
I have seen people in a BBtank using floaters and reduce Nitrates by 10 to 20 pts with a high bio-load
DavidZ is offline  
post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 02:18 AM
OVT
Carpe Diem
 
OVT's Avatar
 
PTrader: (144/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NorCal
Posts: 7,477
One adult and healthy water hyacinth reduced N from 20 ppm to 《 10 ppm in 24 hours in my 12 long. That's the closest I came to a "scientific experiment". Water hyacinth is a well studied plant and there must be some info on its uptake behavior somewhere on the web.
OVT is online now  
post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 04:29 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
lksdrinker's Avatar
 
PTrader: (9/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: NY; LETS GO METS
Posts: 1,916
Well I think we can all agree that plants will lower nitrates as they consume it. Putting a number on it though seems all but impossible. Unless you're talking about a single speck of duckweed or something that can be easily replicated and compared across multiple tanks. My wisteria plant (or any species) might consume 10 ppm of nitrate in 24 hours; but I couldnt use that to definitively say wisteria in general will consume 10 ppm of nitrate in 24 hours. How big is the plant; how healthy was it to begin with; how starved has it been for nitrogen and/or how "overfed" has it been recently; not to mention what factors in my tank are continuing to add to the nitrogen readings etc.

Rich's Fishes
Curator of an ever growing fishroom that currently houses 30 different tanks. Most full of at least water....some even have fish!
lksdrinker is offline  
post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 04:57 PM
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: California
Posts: 166
Saw some published research 20 years ago that said nothing beats water hyacinth at sucking out nitrates. But you will may some to lower water level a little and possibly add some light over the hyacinth. Water lettuce does an excellent job as well. Or just a quick water change. :-)
Saxa Tilly is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome