Suggestions for Aggressive slopes
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > Specific Aspects of a Planted Tank > Aquascaping


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-11-2009, 08:31 AM   #1
JimmyYahoo
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
JimmyYahoo's Avatar
 
PTrader: (16/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: California
Posts: 328
Default

Suggestions for Aggressive slopes


In my next tank i would like to create dramatic slopes since i will be working with a large footprint (48x18x24). I am curios to know if anyone has as experience creating such as aquascape or has any links to where this has been done. I am working on a few ideas that i will explain if there is any interest in this thread.


Thanks much.
JimmyYahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-11-2009, 12:17 PM   #2
Gatekeeper
Planted Tank VIP
 
Gatekeeper's Avatar
 
PTrader: (96/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Earth
Posts: 6,621
Default

Do tell... perhaps we can direct you better with more detail.

FYI, almost all substrates will settle over time. If you really want a large slope, you need to anchor the slope with "something" to keep it in shape, such as rocks (exposed or not exposed).
__________________
Gatekeeper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2009, 01:39 PM   #3
jasa73
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (21/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Cambridge, MA
Posts: 334
Default

Hey - I'd be interested as well. I'm upgrading to a tank with the same dimensions...90 gallons right? I'm chewing on ideas for slopes as well. Let's hear your idea!
jasa73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2009, 03:10 PM   #4
FrostyNYC
Wannabe Guru
 
FrostyNYC's Avatar
 
PTrader: (16/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: NYC & Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,448
Send a message via AIM to FrostyNYC
Default

I believe that some substrates are better at holding slopes than others. I read in a thread that ADA aquasoil holds slopes very well, but I have no experience with that substrate myself.

Like gmccreedy said, best bet is to support the slope with rockwork. Any plexiglass or other barriers will lead to a "tiered" effect, unless you reslope it when needed. I would also be wary of anaerobic pockets in very deep slopes.
__________________
FrostyNYC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 04:42 AM   #5
rbarn
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 776
Default

Slopes will never hold if too steep.
Will always settle into an equilibrium.

Think of building terraces with rocks and wood instead and then
blending each level into a slope using plants, wood and rocks.
rbarn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 06:37 AM   #6
Hilde
Planted Tank Guru
 
Hilde's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mableton, GA
Posts: 4,496
Default

Check out Terraces by Peter Champus here.

Also I have been told that to prevent gas build up under high slope to have plants with deep roots.

To build the terraces you could use metal flashing and cover with gravel.

Last edited by Hilde; 04-12-2009 at 06:38 AM.. Reason: adding
Hilde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2009, 04:22 AM   #7
JimmyYahoo
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
JimmyYahoo's Avatar
 
PTrader: (16/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: California
Posts: 328
Default

Anerobic pockets, huge piles of filler material, and empty open spaces are all things im trying to avoid. Aquasoil does hold a slope very well. Ive been able to create some decent slopes by pouring into the tank slowly while misting with a water bottle. Over time however the water does win and everything settles. Ive have thought to attempt to grow the plants emmersed on the slopes then fill with water once a nice root structure is in place to hold the dirt. This method floated around for awhile using HC but i rarely read any positive outcomes.

Ive also though to create a sort of molded shell using stainless steel screen like that you see flame moss growing on. The idea is basically to have two layers about 1.5 inches apart to sandwich in some substrate. Thing is is that stuff is expensive and hard to shape without a mold.

Last idea is a hybrid of both. Create the hills while dry then lay on some semi rigid net like material (i know of no such product) over the slopes. Ive seen this method used to prevent erosion on a large scale but dont know how well its would work small scale in the tank. Something custom may be in order like netting dipped in an epoxy so it hardens up.

Well, all in all just brainstorming at the moment. If anyone sees any pitfalls or ways to make what ive come up with better let me know. In the end ill try something, im going to have to see it not work to believe it.

Thanks.
JimmyYahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 03:52 PM   #8
saint27
Planted Member
 
saint27's Avatar
 
PTrader: (12/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: East Helena, MT
Posts: 260
Send a message via MSN to saint27 Send a message via Yahoo to saint27
Default

I have designed a few reinforced soil slopes for bridge abutments and always thought it would be cool to do one in an aquarium. Here is one idea I drew up awhile ago. You could do something similar without the tier. I was thinking of planting with HC or micro swords.



__________________
saint27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 04:00 PM   #9
Aquamadman
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Izmir , Turkey
Posts: 54
Default

Im gonna suggest something rather radical but while looking at some ancient city wall constructions ( I study archaeology ) I thought it might be an idea to use pebbles of 2cm radius at the bottom then layering those with smaller pebbles as you go higher and finally covering them with moss or aquasoil.

Now you dont want the soil to slide off so you could try making a grid of some sort or by terracing.

Hope this helps
__________________
[/SIGPIC]Want to go nano , but donīt know where to start
Aquamadman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 04:09 PM   #10
jargonchipmunk
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (10/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Kansas City, KS
Posts: 992
Default

why do you want to AVOID "large piles of filler material"? It will cut your costs by a lot, not to mention it works.
terrace the ground and hide the "terraces" with plants. I never see my substrate with all the plants in there anyway.

If you're looking to plant a carpet over the whole slope it would obviously present a whole new challenge, but in that case, if you're going to be using water column ferts... don't use soil on the slope. Make a form for the hills out of a mesh material (like the moss screens you were talking about) and make a sandwich that goes something like this:

Top mesh layer
plants
rockwool (or other absorptive material that will hold nutrients)
Bottom mesh later

The plants can grow fine into the rockwool and the water column ferts will provide all they need. The rockwool will even absorb some of the nutrients the plants don't use and become a bit of a fertilizer in and of itself if something proves lacking at any point.

Granted, I've never tried this myself, and haven't seen it tried, but hey... I'm an idea man lol I never claimed to actually KNOW what I was talking about. :-)
jargonchipmunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 06:23 PM   #11
Crystalview
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (20/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: North Sierra's CA
Posts: 842
Default

Would the dutch stype slopes work? I am trying to create a flow of UG. I am still looking for ways to do a slope with a tunnel for the Discus and other fish to swim through.

http://www.aquabotanic.com/dutchsecrets.htm
__________________
75g, pair of Blue Rams plus baby, 4 3"discus, 12ADF's, 96w 6700k-light 8hrs, No C02, Excel, EI dry macro's and micro's, Eheim 2126, 18w UV, 2 Nano 270 powerhead. wall of bubbles for more O2 for such a deep tank.
Crystalview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 09:42 PM   #12
kwc1974
Algae Grower
 
kwc1974's Avatar
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 38
Default

Mike @ADG is doing something wild using platic pieces to stabilize the slope. wish I could show a pic but he is entering it in the contest. needless to say, the tank is a 75 gallon and the Amazonia is 5" from the top back corner.
kwc1974 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2009, 05:24 AM   #13
Hilde
Planted Tank Guru
 
Hilde's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mableton, GA
Posts: 4,496
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyYahoo View Post
Last idea is a hybrid of both. Create the hills while dry then lay on some semi rigid net like material.
I have seen some do that in an aquarium using egg crates, which is actually the screen material that goes under flouresant lights.

I was wonder if laying the netting over the dirt will cause the soil to be compacted and cause anerobic conditions. Has anybody done this?
Hilde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2009, 05:28 PM   #14
JimmyYahoo
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
JimmyYahoo's Avatar
 
PTrader: (16/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: California
Posts: 328
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by saint27 View Post
I have designed a few reinforced soil slopes for bridge abutments and always thought it would be cool to do one in an aquarium. Here is one idea I drew up awhile ago. You could do something similar without the tier. I was thinking of planting with HC or micro swords.



Interesting. I foresee the gravel settling and eventually having a terraced effect that looks similar to a tiered rice patty. That would not look bad but its not what i am am going for. A smoother slope is the plan.
JimmyYahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2009, 05:40 PM   #15
JimmyYahoo
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
JimmyYahoo's Avatar
 
PTrader: (16/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: California
Posts: 328
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jargonchipmunk View Post
why do you want to AVOID "large piles of filler material"? It will cut your costs by a lot, not to mention it works.
terrace the ground and hide the "terraces" with plants. I never see my substrate with all the plants in there anyway.

If you're looking to plant a carpet over the whole slope it would obviously present a whole new challenge, but in that case, if you're going to be using water column ferts... don't use soil on the slope. Make a form for the hills out of a mesh material (like the moss screens you were talking about) and make a sandwich that goes something like this:

Top mesh layer
plants
rockwool (or other absorptive material that will hold nutrients)
Bottom mesh later

The plants can grow fine into the rockwool and the water column ferts will provide all they need. The rockwool will even absorb some of the nutrients the plants don't use and become a bit of a fertilizer in and of itself if something proves lacking at any point.

Granted, I've never tried this myself, and haven't seen it tried, but hey... I'm an idea man lol I never claimed to actually KNOW what I was talking about. :-)
You may have something here. Rockwool might indeed work and no chance of that loosing its slope since it could be one fibrous piece, or several stitched together then tied to a mesh structure. Simlar to how they make floats - form the shape with chicken wire (not suggesting to use this) then put the rockwool over it.

However, ive never seen plans that spread by runners grown in rockwool - its always stem plants. Anyone have any input on this?
JimmyYahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012