DIY wet/dry with built in overflow
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Old 03-29-2009, 10:16 PM   #1
rbarn
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DIY wet/dry with built in overflow


This is the first step in my fully automated uber high tech 100 gallon
planted Discus tank.

Home made wet/dry. In the pics it is just siliconed together
but it has since been tore apart redone with acrylic cement.

New water will be added next to the return pump. This will raise
the level of water in the sump, causing old tank water on the way to
the pump to overflow and run out thru wall into the garage into
another sump where it will be pumped off to a drain.

Filter will be fed by an internal overflow baffle.

Will probably add a chiller and another canister filter to the tank
with separate input and return thru bulkhead fittings on bottom of aquarium.





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Old 03-31-2009, 07:21 PM   #2
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Do you keep your sump sealed. I have read many people have problems keeping Co2 within the water column?


Looks amazing BTW
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Old 03-31-2009, 08:59 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dj2606 View Post
Do you keep your sump sealed. I have read many people have problems keeping Co2 within the water column?


Looks amazing BTW
Thanks,

Sump is not sealed, traditional trickle wet/dry filter.

Read of problems with quick Co2 out gassing thru the trickle also
but going to give it a try and see whats acceptable to me.

I'm sure lots of tweaking will be involved before everything is "dialed in"
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Old 04-03-2009, 11:49 PM   #4
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How did you get all the silicone off the acrylic so that the acrylic cement will bond properly? What solvent cement did you use? Did you make a eurobrace top for the sump?
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Old 04-04-2009, 02:18 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuukus View Post
How did you get all the silicone off the acrylic so that the acrylic cement will bond properly? What solvent cement did you use? Did you make a eurobrace top for the sump?
Lots of tedious scraping with a razor blade took the silicone right off.

I used Weld-On #16 I got from local plastic supply company
Cost like $7 for big tube.

The internal baffles should be more than enough brace for the sides.
No need for a eurobrace.
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Old 04-04-2009, 09:44 PM   #6
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I would be worried about the silicone getting into the pores of the acrylic wich might affect the weld on 16's strength and ability to bond correctly.

I have worked with acrylic for about 3 years now and just from experience I recomend using weld-on 3 or 4 or 40 because weld-on 16 shrinks at least 30% so its hard to get a perfectly clear glue joint.

I really like the design of the wet dry man it looks pretty good.
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Old 04-05-2009, 01:32 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuukus View Post
I would be worried about the silicone getting into the pores of the acrylic wich might affect the weld on 16's strength and ability to bond correctly.

I have worked with acrylic for about 3 years now and just from experience I recomend using weld-on 3 or 4 or 40 because weld-on 16 shrinks at least 30% so its hard to get a perfectly clear glue joint.

I really like the design of the wet dry man it looks pretty good.
I made sure to scrape the acrylic edges with a razor blade to remove
silicone until I started getting shavings of acrylic coming off. Insuring clean
surface.

My edges were not perfect, so I used #16 to get a better bond on the
irregular surfaces. Then I went back and "sealed" all the critical joints with
a bead of silicone again.

Now, its held to together with acrylic cement joints and sealed with silicone
instead of sealed and held together with silicone only.

First try at working with acrylic, so wasnt expecting a "perfect" job.
As a much learning experience as anything.

I'm sure it will get chunked for a better design after a few months of operation, lol
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Old 04-10-2009, 03:56 PM   #8
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You will lose a considerable amount of CO2 with no cover on it. The biological wet/dry filter will work fine even if covered. My homemade wet/dry has an acrylic cover and it's sealed with duct tape-the overflow has a lid on it too. My CO2 reactor (DIY) is almost 2 feet tall by 5" diameter and my bubble rate is way too fast to count-so trust me-you'll want to cover it.
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