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Old 04-24-2014, 08:10 PM   #31
Duck5003
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Originally Posted by samee View Post
Im surprised how long its taking to circulate into the hobby. If I remember correctly, Ive seen forum posts from 2006 when I google searched the plant a few months ago. I find it cool that we have anabuis nana and now buce.
From what i have gathered from some other sources i have purchased from, they have been around for a few years however used to be a hundred plus dollars per plant. Now we're seeing them all under a $100, for the most part with a large variety and most being under $30. It really is great that they are getting out there now though, because they are so unique to me. We also have some great members on here who have propogated them and have them available at lower and lower prices, some have even been RAOK'd *cough* OP *cough* its good to share so more people get to experience new and exotic flora and fauna!

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Originally Posted by pianofish View Post
Also Eric, there are some Buces, that I have, one being Buce Bukit Betung, that does not produce side babies like other buces or anubias, I've actually had it for a year and it grow very much like a palm tree, the base of the "tree" gets longer and longer like a trunk, and it only produces leaves at the top of the "trunk" stem. It actually is a pretty cool plant lol. But just thought I'd throw in that some buce species do not make baby plants the normal way, I'm still looking for how to reproduce this one, any ideas?
Joshua
That does sound really cool, Josh. I'd love to see some pics. Off the top of my head i have two ideas, one is probly a little too big of a risk but i'll throw it out there lol

1. Top it mid trunk and try and get the top to root, hopefully the remaining trunk will start to produce new leaves (This would be that last resort method IMO)

B. Depending on how large the root system is, maybe lop of a large chunk of root/roots and try to get something to take off from that? This method shouldn't hurt your plant.

Just my 2 pennies
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Old 04-25-2014, 04:59 AM   #32
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I have seen some of those really upright buce, but never had one myself! I'd love to see photos. I agree with Duck though, if you can cut the rhizome at the other end from where it's growing, making sure both pieces have roots, I bet you the leafless rhizome might be forced to grown new plants. Worth a try, the cut probably won't do any harm to the original.

Yeah, it's great the prices are coming down, I'm doing my best to help that trend it seems, lol. But at the same time my best to get way more people addicted
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Old 04-27-2014, 10:31 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samee View Post
Im surprised how long its taking to circulate into the hobby. If I remember correctly, Ive seen forum posts from 2006 when I google searched the plant a few months ago. I find it cool that we have anabuis nana and now buce.
not jumping on the bandwagon yet till they get the scientific names sorted out , claims to be rare , but how rare is it ? considering the price one small clump it commands
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Old 04-27-2014, 03:16 PM   #34
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i don't think it is as rare as people claim it to be. if you search the internet you will find hundreds of tanks that are full of nothing but buces.

i think the "rare" claim is coming from the lack of a viable supplier stateside. most of the sellers i run into/see selling, are from indonisea, malasya, thailand, etc. they seem to have unlimited supply, where as the people who actually sell locally only have a limited supply.
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Old 04-27-2014, 03:52 PM   #35
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I think I should have enough Brownie ghost to start a the new setup :P


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Old 04-27-2014, 11:38 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Aquatic Delight View Post
i don't think it is as rare as people claim it to be. if you search the internet you will find hundreds of tanks that are full of nothing but buces.

i think the "rare" claim is coming from the lack of a viable supplier stateside. most of the sellers i run into/see selling, are from indonisea, malasya, thailand, etc. they seem to have unlimited supply, where as the people who actually sell locally only have a limited supply.
seriously i dont mind paying top dollars for a rare fish , but plants ? what overheads they got , all they need is a trekking outfit and a spade , the plant stay there stationary waiting to be dug out
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Old 04-28-2014, 12:15 AM   #37
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I will rather pay for beautiful plants...than fish. If you're into planted tanks and aquascaping, then plants play the main role and focal point on the tanks...not fish/shrimps/snails (which are used for cleaning purpose)
The point here is depends on what you are interested in: keeping fish or doing planted aquascapes
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Old 04-28-2014, 12:39 AM   #38
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Also, let me share some of my buces that I have and used to have :











Flowering
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Old 04-28-2014, 05:25 AM   #39
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I took a few more photos as well.

Mini Penelope


Lamandau


Theia 5 (it seems to be one of the smaller Theia types)


Red Cherry (one of the rounder leaves I've seen for Buce)


Super Mini Catherine (I haven't seen any other Buce this consistently small, been growing bunches of this for a long time, and it stays tiny)
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:22 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by junglefowl View Post
I will rather pay for beautiful plants...than fish. If you're into planted tanks and aquascaping, then plants play the main role and focal point on the tanks...not fish/shrimps/snails (which are used for cleaning purpose)
The point here is depends on what you are interested in: keeping fish or doing planted aquascapes
Agreed brother! Plants always come first in a tank for me. Then there's the guaranteed nerite snails amano shrimp and bn plecos. Maybe, maybe then I'll add some fish. That's how my latest buce scape tank was done.


Nice buces fellas! Check out the portfolio link in my sig for a wallop of buce pics.
Joshua
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:42 AM   #41
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seriously i dont mind paying top dollars for a rare fish , but plants ? what overheads they got , all they need is a trekking outfit and a spade , the plant stay there stationary waiting to be dug out
That isn't how it works. Bucephlandra are only found on the island of Borneo in the Pacific. Next with the exception of some aquacultured ones the majority are wild collected. Most species are unknown or new to science. Please research how much an expedition to Borneo would cost, trekking into remote and dangerous jungles and collecting specimens then bringing them home, then get back to me. I guarantee the price then will look bargain basket affordable.
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Old 04-28-2014, 12:18 PM   #42
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That isn't how it works. Bucephlandra are only found on the island of Borneo in the Pacific. Next with the exception of some aquacultured ones the majority are wild collected. Most species are unknown or new to science. Please research how much an expedition to Borneo would cost, trekking into remote and dangerous jungles and collecting specimens then bringing them home, then get back to me. I guarantee the price then will look bargain basket affordable.
you are paying money for the unknown
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:21 PM   #43
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We are paying money for the ability to own and cultivate a beautiful underwater plant that very few have access to. It may not be scientifically classified, but it has identification system all on it's own. You pay top dollar because this isn't something Florida aquatics farm raises. No one except hobbyists do at the moment. Similar to buying and paying top dollar for rare cryptocorynes, the beauty and the price is in the eye of the beholder. Some of us could care less about rare fish and shrimp. Why do some grades of crystal shrimp go for thousands of $$? That's just what some people are into and they appreciate the time and effort that went towards developing those shrimp.

I am paying money for the un"classified" yes. Unknown not so much. I am paying for beautiful plants that grow slow which is my style. I am paying for epiphytes as they are one of my favorite types of plants. I am paying for rare plants that only come from a few areas in the world. Also, I've read several articles stating that buce collection sites are endangered as they begin to be developed, so in a way as hobbyists we can preserve rare types of buce. Through growing and distributing amongst fellow hobbyists. Is that a little more justified?
Cheers,
Joshua
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Old 04-28-2014, 08:50 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by pianofish View Post
We are paying money for the ability to own and cultivate a beautiful underwater plant that very few have access to. It may not be scientifically classified, but it has identification system all on it's own. You pay top dollar because this isn't something Florida aquatics farm raises. No one except hobbyists do at the moment. Similar to buying and paying top dollar for rare cryptocorynes, the beauty and the price is in the eye of the beholder. Some of us could care less about rare fish and shrimp. Why do some grades of crystal shrimp go for thousands of $$? That's just what some people are into and they appreciate the time and effort that went towards developing those shrimp.

I am paying money for the un"classified" yes. Unknown not so much. I am paying for beautiful plants that grow slow which is my style. I am paying for epiphytes as they are one of my favorite types of plants. I am paying for rare plants that only come from a few areas in the world. Also, I've read several articles stating that buce collection sites are endangered as they begin to be developed, so in a way as hobbyists we can preserve rare types of buce. Through growing and distributing amongst fellow hobbyists. Is that a little more justified?
Cheers,
Joshua
Couldnt have said it any better myself to each their own! Or in some cases, each to many of their own I've been bitten by "BUGS"

Either way you look at it, its all fun, which is why we have hobbies

Beautiful pics everyone! One of these days i will get some better ones of mine. Catfish, that pic of your brownie ghost lot made me drool a little

Eric, that super mini is sweet. Is that what your trying to carpet your buce scape with??
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Old 04-28-2014, 10:34 PM   #45
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Ericj and others, I mostly see Buces grown emersed. What is the longest period of time you have kept them submersed and do they actually grow leaves underwater? Are the leaves morphologically any different from emersed grown leaves or are they the same?

Also, interestingly I was just able to get some nitrogen deficiency photos of a few Buce species from a friend. I'll be adding more photos but I figure this is a good thread to post them in. It took 2 years of no fertilizing in an emersed enclosure to develop nitrogen deficiency. http://deficiencyfinder.com/?page_id=819
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