Asian Rummynose Info
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Old 01-23-2008, 03:36 AM   #1
dekstr
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Asian Rummynose Info


Okay a branch off from the "what's your favorite schooling fish thread", where I was talking about keeping the asian rummynose tetra.

The story was that I was at a LFS a month or two ago, I was looking at more fish for my community tank, and the owner told me about this asian rummynose fish he was selling. He said they were really beautiful, that is, after they coloured up. He even showed me google pictures of them--> http://images.google.com/images?hl=e...-8&sa=N&tab=wi

I went home and did some research.

Most useful link was here: http://animal-world.com/encyclo/fres...oseRasbora.php


Difference between the normal rummynose tetra (all 3-4 variations in South America) and this asian counterpart:


"Although the Rummy Nose Rasbora has developed surprisingly similar markings to the South American Rummy Nose Tetra, the two species developed separately into transcontinental look-alikes. This fish has no shortage of common names, being referred to as the Asian Rummynose, Sawbwa Barb, Naked Micro Rasbora, and Rummynose Rasbora. The numerous common names, including both the term barb and rasbora, are due to an ongoing debate over whether this fish fits into the Barb, Rasbora, or Danio category, or if they belong in their own group.

By whatever name and group you choose, this is a great fish for color and temperament. They are very particular about their water, but they are otherwise hardy and easy enough to care for. Because of their sensitivity to water conditions, they are generally not a good beginner fish. They are peaceful so can be kept in a community environment, but they are a bit nervous. They actually do the best with a sexually balanced school of their own kind, and in their own specimen tank."


Basically, they only come from one place, Inle lake and its surrounding swampland in Myanmar/Burma, Asia. They live in very hard water, with neutral pH, in both clear and blackwater, under very thick aquatic vegetation in large schools. When males and females are mixed together, the males develop a darker blue body. They are slightly skittish. They are not an endangered species. They are not beginner fish, but they are not too difficult to keep once you meet their desired water parameters. Also, there has been an established method to breed them, though domestic breeding has taken place.

Of all fish sites to find info, I found planetcatfish.com with some clues to its introduction of the asian rummynose into the ornamental fish trade.

http://www.planetcatfish.com/cotm/co...article_id=151

" Let me tell you the tale of Sawbwa resplendens, the Asian Rummy Nose. When first introduced, this pretty fish took the hobby by storm. Breeding successes did not follow - despite various attempts by experienced breeders. It was not until this fishes "secret" came to light that captive breeding was successful. When collecting this fish, it was found with a similar fish that was dullish brown, lacking the dashing silvery flanks, attractive red face and caudal flashes of the rummy nose. The collectors discarded this fish and brought only the saleable, attractive fish to the exporters. That "secret" was the fact that the dull brown fish was the female of this species. Once all humans involved understood this, captive reproduction and indeed farming of this fish was not long off."



*The general physical differences between this fish and the South American Rummynoses include:

- They are smaller, they reach an adult size of 1", compared to 2-2.5" for the South American rummynose.
- Males and females differ completely in coloration. Males have noses and tail tips which are orange-red, and their body a sky blue. The females have transparent fins, dull brown body. The regular rummynose tetra do not differ in colouration between the sexes. The only difference you will notice is that females tend to have stockier, bigger build.


*Note: when I refer to the South American rummynose tetra, I am referring to all 3-4 variations found in different parts of South America)


I have read that the Asian rummynose are imported infrequently, and usually only in larger cities by LFSes. This is surprising as I think they are beautiful + hardy fish once acclimated.

It's between two months and they are still sitting at that store. I talked to the owner and he is going to sell the whole batch. I'm going to keep them in my 20g long. I have the water parameters almost set (+12 dGH, pH 7-7.5, temp 23 degrees celsius) with my super (assorted) guppies and their fry safety-testing the tank for me. Hope all goes well.
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Old 01-23-2008, 03:50 AM   #2
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Did some more digging:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inle_Lake

The fish has actually been around for a while. The region in Inle Lake in Myanmar has been in political turmoil for the past 2 decades. The asian rummynose is really common and indigeneous to the lake. 20 snails and 7 other fish species have been identified as being found nowhere else in the world. These species are of no siginificant commercial importance to the aquarium trade. I would assume the locals make bait out of this fish.
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Old 01-23-2008, 05:31 AM   #3
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here you go
http://www.franksaquarium.com/rasbora.htm
toward the bottom of the page.
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Old 01-23-2008, 01:19 PM   #4
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Really, really should not call this fish a tetra. Tetras are found in South America, Central America, and West Africa, not Asia. I know I'm a bit of a stickler for scientific names with out-of-the-ordinary fish, but this is too much. Drives me almost as crazy as the "White Cloud Tetra," which is a Cyprinid.
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:01 PM   #5
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I just saw these at petsmart. Anyone know if they are as good of schoolers as the rummynose tetras?
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:21 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glmory View Post
I just saw these at petsmart. Anyone know if they are as good of schoolers as the rummynose tetras?
really? ooh. I gotta go check.

here's some info
http://www.seriouslyfish.com/profile...es=resplendens
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:16 PM   #7
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nice link mistergreen,

I actually just made a profile today on the asian rummynose here: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/my...splendens.html

And I used info from seriouslyfish.com, so it's exactly the same.

The picture I took myself after many tries on fast shutter speed and good timing.
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:23 PM   #8
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Oh good dkstr- I really was clicking on this thread just now to say that you should make a profile- you did some good research on this one!!!
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:34 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lauraleellbp View Post
Oh good dkstr- I really was clicking on this thread just now to say that you should make a profile- you did some good research on this one!!!
It's not my research! I just did a lot of googling and cross-referencing.

Right now I keep 40+ asian rummynose in a non-co2 planted 20 gallon long species tank (30" x 12" x 12"). The co-inhabitants are 3 peppered cories, some pond snails and 3 oto cats as clean-up crew.

I would say they are very timid in the sense that they will never pick a fight and will try to avoid confrontation. However, the males colour really well (dark power blue body with burning orange nose and fin tips). They like to compete for females in a very interesting behaviour.

What the males do is stalk the female by trying to follow wherever they go, always pitting their nose underneath the female's belly. The females scuttle away but the males are persistent. Then another male would cut in, the female swims away, and then the two-males would battle in a herky-jerky motion, spiralling around each other in a horizontal cyclone. Other males would ensue to join in (usually 3-5 males in a battle) until they get distracted and start chasing the females again.

But most of the time they are lazy and just stay suspended in one area without doing much.

---
Also, they have very small mouths. They need very small bits of food in order to be able to eat them. However, they really like sinking pellets even if the pellets are bigger than their heads. A whole group of 10 will surround one pellet and peck at it until it disappears.
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:31 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dekstr View Post
It's not my research! I just did a lot of googling and cross-referencing.
That's a form of research!
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:41 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lauraleellbp View Post
That's a form of research!
Oh I meant original research!
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Old 01-29-2011, 04:34 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dekstr View Post
It's not my research! I just did a lot of googling and cross-referencing.

Right now I keep 40+ asian rummynose in a non-co2 planted 20 gallon long species tank (30" x 12" x 12"). The co-inhabitants are 3 peppered cories, some pond snails and 3 oto cats as clean-up crew.

I would say they are very timid in the sense that they will never pick a fight and will try to avoid confrontation. However, the males colour really well (dark power blue body with burning orange nose and fin tips). They like to compete for females in a very interesting behaviour.

What the males do is stalk the female by trying to follow wherever they go, always pitting their nose underneath the female's belly. The females scuttle away but the males are persistent. Then another male would cut in, the female swims away, and then the two-males would battle in a herky-jerky motion, spiralling around each other in a horizontal cyclone. Other males would ensue to join in (usually 3-5 males in a battle) until they get distracted and start chasing the females again.

But most of the time they are lazy and just stay suspended in one area without doing much.

---
Also, they have very small mouths. They need very small bits of food in order to be able to eat them. However, they really like sinking pellets even if the pellets are bigger than their heads. A whole group of 10 will surround one pellet and peck at it until it disappears.
You siad you have 40+ of them in the 20 long.. someone told me i had to many guppies in my 20 long... IM confused???
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Old 02-01-2012, 12:06 AM   #13
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Lll
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