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Old 04-13-2014, 04:00 PM   #46
ua hua
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Originally Posted by BruceF View Post
I would like to make the argument for the colorful planted aquarium that is not the Dutch planted aquarium. It strikes me that many people grow plants in an arrangement that they refer to as sort of Dutch which in fact have nothing in common with Dutch rules but simply is a shorthand for colorful. It almost seems like there is a whole school of aquascaping that involves blending hardscape and color contrast that is simply dismissed as not being Dutch enough and not being Japanese enough but is never recognized as being a school in and of itself.
I would agree that just because a tank has lots of colorful stem plants doesn't qualify it as a traditional Dutch scape. I personally like to have hard scape in my tank and I have no desire to have the back and sides of my tank covered so therefore I will never do a Dutch tank in the traditional sense but I like the idea behind a Dutch tank more so than I do the nature style. Maybe instead of calling it Dutch style it should be called American style or western style which is just a hybrid style with the Dutch influence. This side of the world needs to have its own style so why not intermix the styles of the other traditions such as nature and Dutch.
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Old 04-14-2014, 11:38 PM   #47
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I have a empty tank with dimmensions 60x30x30cm, is it too small? Is it better with a higher tank for a Dutch setup?
I would say that if you're going for that Dutch inspired look then what we've been discussing is that you can "make it your own". No need to stick with the traditional rules but rather just arrange plant groupings with different colors & leaf textures in combination with a bit of hardscaping (or without...either way) should be done to your liking in any size tank. Experiment with what you have and see how it goes...enjoy the journey.
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Old 04-17-2014, 04:51 AM   #48
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Not a Dutch scape by any means but it still has to be one of the most beautiful tanks I have seen.

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Old 04-17-2014, 05:43 AM   #49
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How come those Dutch tanks don't have the plants swaying in the water current? Do they usually have lower water flow? I'm impressed that the lower leafs don't have a spec of algae on them. The growth is very healthy over all, something that I struggle with. It doesn't look like they have very high lighting either, amazing tanks.
Mostly due to the old myth that it will drive off CO2.

This was common back before they used CO2 gas(you have a pronounced increase over the night and it builds up, they even used tight fitting lids to cap and catch the gas naturally built up over the night). Later, some felt it would drive off more of the CO2 that they added with gas tanks.

Well, if you have a lot of surface breaking, yea, but if you keep it right before breaking, then it works well.

I used Wet/drys before getting into planted tanks and have continued since.
I used spray bars placed out of view on the bottom.

This allowed a lot of current and CO2 rich water to come up through the plant beds and then to the weir box. I was using DIY CO2 back then, so this step was needed to get the most out of a limited CO2 supply and high light.

Today, I do not need that with a gas tank CO2 supply.

So you can do either and most do have more flow than you might think. They just hide it, that's one thing they are obsessive about. I use to add cork backs to my tanks. I wrote articles about it back in the 1990's.
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