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Old 12-24-2013, 04:07 PM   #1
FewestKitten896
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New to this whole fish keeping stuff


So I had a betta when I was like 5 years old or something like that and 20+ years later I learned about these planted tanks.

Anyways, I have a 10 gallon planted tank and don't really know where to start on selecting fish. It is a low tech tank in the aspect of no ferts/co2 but I using 2.6 watts per gallon. I do know that I want to keep some shrimp and then something else that is relatively small. I would like to keep more fish than fewer bigger fish, but not opposed to 1-2 larger fish and the rest small. Any suggestions? I haven't tested my water for softness or hardness. My wife wants to pick out some fish but I would like to limit her on her selections so I don't have to keep saying, "No, the tank is not big enough" over and over.
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:49 PM   #2
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First thing I would do is find out what your water is like - hardness, pH, etc. and pick fish that do well in those conditions. While you can change the water conditions to match fish, it is simpler and easier to match fish to your water.
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:58 PM   #3
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Make sure your filter is completely cycled and add fish slowly.
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Old 12-24-2013, 06:21 PM   #4
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Shrimp have pretty specific water chemistry needs so you should do your homework before adding any. If you do want shrimp you will need to stick to small fish to keep them from getting chowed on. Super easy, cheap, and beautiful neon tetras are a great starter fish.
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Old 12-24-2013, 07:07 PM   #5
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Being in the center of the country, there is a good chance that your water will be moderately hard and alkaline. Not totally true but there is a lot of limestone under the middle of the country. Any limestone quarries nearby? Much depends on the source of your water.
Choice of fish is very personal and depends a lot on your outlook about the future of the tank and fish. I consider it all to be temporary and to be changed as I wish. Others like to feel attached to the fish as pets might. If they are not to be permanent, young small fish open up a wide range of choices. In small tanks as starter fish, I love angelfish. Even when tiny, they look good and have lots of personality not found in some fish. But they will outgrow a ten and need to move.
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Old 12-24-2013, 07:20 PM   #6
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I agree with all of the advice already given. You should check your ph as well as the hardness of your water. Shrimp are relatively finiky when it comes to those water parameters, fish however can adapt.

If you planned on eventually adding shrimp you would really want to get micro fish. i.e. Endler Guppies, ember Tetras, Chili rasboras, Pygmy cory's etc... If you have difficulties finding sources for these types of fish near you, you can always look for people on the forums that are selling them. Many people do
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Old 12-24-2013, 07:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlantedRich View Post
Being in the center of the country, there is a good chance that your water will be moderately hard and alkaline. Not totally true but there is a lot of limestone under the middle of the country. Any limestone quarries nearby? Much depends on the source of your water.
Choice of fish is very personal and depends a lot on your outlook about the future of the tank and fish. I consider it all to be temporary and to be changed as I wish. Others like to feel attached to the fish as pets might. If they are not to be permanent, young small fish open up a wide range of choices. In small tanks as starter fish, I love angelfish. Even when tiny, they look good and have lots of personality not found in some fish. But they will outgrow a ten and need to move.
I dont' think we should encourage people to get fish that will out grow their tanks. I think it is a bad pratice as a hobbiest. I find that there are way too many large fish in some of these fish stores that no one wants. You should taylor your fish to your aquarium not just pitch them or toss them when they get too big or you don't want them anymore
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Old 12-24-2013, 07:38 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Topekoms View Post
I dont' think we should encourage people to get fish that will out grow their tanks. I think it is a bad pratice as a hobbiest. I find that there are way too many large fish in some of these fish stores that no one wants. You should taylor your fish to your aquarium not just pitch them or toss them when they get too big or you don't want them anymore
I personally dont believe that that was the angle Rich was coming from. I believe that he was talking about using the 10 gallon as a stepping stone into the wide variety of tank sizes there are available. So a fish such as an angle would work well in a 10 gallon that will eventually turn into say a 40 or a 120 gallon while they are still young.
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Old 12-25-2013, 01:43 AM   #9
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I do plan on going bigger at some point in time, but honestly not even supposed to have a tank in my apartment at all..figured a 10 would be rather discrete...but I would rather get something permanent than hope to have a bigger tank in the future...I was thinking bout those pygmy corys and something fairly bright in color...the neons are nice but feel they are over rated, everybody seems to have one...
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Old 12-25-2013, 02:35 AM   #10
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Actually my point was not to encourage getting larger and larger tanks but it has never been my experience that having angelfish grow out to be too large for a ten was the same as having too many large fish in the LFS. Perhaps your experience is different but when I was breeding fish and asking shops what they might buy best, the answer was angelfish! Angelfish are never out of style and they are super hard to ship when they get larger than a half dollar. I never had any problem with downloading any angel bigger than a quarter so I think they make great fish to grow out in a ten and sell off to shops or other folks. If I had recommended something like plecos, that would be different as they are totally worthless when they get big. They are what often wind up in the junk tank at stores. If the store will even consider it!
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Old 12-25-2013, 02:53 AM   #11
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As mentioned before, you'd want to check your water parameters, but the chili rasbora is an option for color and you could add 12-15 of these, along with 6-8 habrosus cories. Another choice might be celestial pearl danios, also known as Danio margaritatus. There are many rasboras and microrasboras to take a look at.
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Old 12-25-2013, 04:13 AM   #12
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red cherry shrimp are super hardy.

a 10 gallon isn't that big, i think sticking to the smaller species would make it look better.
having a micro fish tank with rcs would be pretty cool.

you can't go wrong with neon tetras. they've got great coloring and they're CHEAP. everyone has them but they're awesome.
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Old 12-25-2013, 04:56 AM   #13
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I like the celestial pearl danios, yet in have never had any -.- I wish to have some but right now my tank has angels and they would eat them for supper lol.
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Old 12-25-2013, 02:28 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SueD View Post
the chili rasbora is an option for color and you could add 12-15 of these, along with 6-8 habrosus cories. Another choice might be celestial pearl danios, also known as Danio margaritatus. There are many rasboras and microrasboras to take a look at.
I am really liking the look of these fish. I will do some more research on them but I am almost done cycling my tank, just waiting for the 24-hour turnaround. I will have to check with some of my lfs to see if they carry these. I have a high end fish store that might have some of these just hope they don't carry the high end fish price. Can you mix these micro fish, like have 7 chili rasbora and then 6-7 of the celestial pearl danios or is it better just to keep one species?

Quote:
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red cherry shrimp are super hardy.

a 10 gallon isn't that big, i think sticking to the smaller species would make it look better.
having a micro fish tank with rcs would be pretty cool.

you can't go wrong with neon tetras. they've got great coloring and they're CHEAP. everyone has them but they're awesome.
Yes, the red cherry shrimp is the shrimp I am looking at. Right now my plants are pretty bare but once they fill in, the shrimp would fit in nicely. I will probably buy my shrimp online though cause they lfs I have wants like $8 for a cherry shrimp.
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Old 12-25-2013, 03:35 PM   #15
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Cycling a tank takes 4-8 weeks, plus you'll want to wait a few months (3-6 months) to grow biofilm. That will feed your baby shrimp and keep them healthy. You need a Mature tank before you can add shrimp. You can add them before but they have better survival. I was a first time shrimp keeper and waited and I am glad I did!!
To keep shrimp you also need the following to start
TDS meter
Gh/kh testing (important for molting of shrimp)
Ph test
API testing kit
Shrimp food (lots of commercial foods have copper and you need shrimp specific stuff)

Then once you get the above, then you'll know whether you need:
Specialized sand or gravel to buffer
Remineralizer
special food
added nutrients
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