Broad spectrum, fully controllable LED shoji lantern
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Old 09-04-2013, 07:42 PM   #1
the_deeb
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Broad spectrum, fully controllable LED shoji lantern


I'm in the process of putting together an interesting DIY light fixture for my 150g shallow tank. It's going to be a fairly low light setup with primarily emergent plants so I'm not going too crazy with the number of LEDs.

Most of the supplies are from LEDGroupBuy:

13 X cool white Cree XT-E
13 X warm white Cree XT-E
2 X 660nm "deep red"
2 X 475nm "deep blue"
2 X 495nm "turquoise"

60 degree optics on most of the white LEDs, no optics on the colored ones.

The LEDs are powered by Meanwell LDD drivers. The warm white string and cool white string are powered by separate LDD-1000H drivers, the red leds are powered by a LDD-500H and the blue and turquoise LEDs are powered by another LDD-500H. Having the LEDs on different drivers will hopefully allow me to easily adjust the intensity of each string to dial in the right color temperature and appearance.

The 1000-H drivers are running at pretty close to fully capacity with 13 LEDs on each string but the 500-H drivers have plenty of room to add additional LEDs if I feel that I need more light in the future.

I'm running the LDDs with the awesome little LDD socket board/Typhon controller combo from O2surplus.
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Old 09-04-2013, 07:55 PM   #2
Chronados
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What are the dimensions on the tank and how high do you plan on hanging the fixture?

Edit: I ask because you mention "shallow", so I think you might have some coverage issues with the number of LED's you have, especially with 60 degree optics.
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:12 PM   #3
jeffkrol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_deeb View Post
I'm in the process of putting together an interesting DIY light fixture for my 150g shallow tank. It's going to be a fairly low light setup with primarily emergent plants so I'm not going too crazy with the number of LEDs.

Most of the supplies are from LEDGroupBuy:

13 X cool white Cree XT-E
13 X warm white Cree XT-E
2 X 660nm "deep red"
2 X 475nm "deep blue"
2 X 495nm "turquoise"

60 degree optics on most of the white LEDs, no optics on the colored ones.

The LEDs are powered by Meanwell LDD drivers. The warm white string and cool white string are powered by separate LDD-1000H drivers, the red leds are powered by a LDD-500H and the blue and turquoise LEDs are powered by another LDD-500H. Having the LEDs on different drivers will hopefully allow me to easily adjust the intensity of each string to dial in the right color temperature and appearance.

The 1000-H drivers are running at pretty close to fully capacity with 13 LEDs on each string but the 500-H drivers have plenty of room to add additional LEDs if I feel that I need more light in the future.

I'm running the LDDs with the awesome little LDD socket board/Typhon controller combo from O2surplus.
hmm .
I'd add more red (and the blue/turquoise) since you are dimming anyways.. In series A are all the same.. only the V increases..

your Vf on the red is like 6V.....
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Old 09-04-2013, 10:27 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by jeffkrol View Post
hmm .
I'd add more red (and the blue/turquoise) since you are dimming anyways.. In series A are all the same.. only the V increases..

your Vf on the red is like 6V.....
Less than that. More like 4V...
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Old 09-05-2013, 12:08 AM   #5
gus6464
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Take off the 60 deg optics or you will have a crazy color spotlight going on. If the tank is less than 24" you do not need optics.

Also there is a lot of overlap in your colored emitters. No need for deep blue and turquoise and you are not hitting the photo peaks with those. 450 and 420nm is what will hit chloro a&b. If you want cool blue and turquoise get ocean coral white LEDs instead which are red, cool blue, and turquoise on one emitter to replace the reds. Then get royal blues and hyper violets for the other drivers.

You might want to think about replacing the warm and cool whites with neutral whites instead as the blues will give you a better spectrum combination by just upping or lowering the power. In summary:

24 neutral white
4 OCW
4 royal blue
4 hyper violet

The ratio for blue to not overpower whites is around 6:1 white/blue.

If you do not want royals or violets then just do 4 OCW since the red/deep blue/turq is what an OCW LED consists of.
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Old 09-05-2013, 05:05 PM   #6
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I appreciate all the advice but I've already ordered the parts and mostly assembled the fixture so it's a little hard to make changes. I'll try to provide some more info to explain my rationale for the LED selections I've made.

The tank is only ~17" deep but it's going to be set up as a riparium so the light is going to be suspended a good 24-30" above the tank. That's why I'm going with the 60 degree optics. Only the white LEDs have optics, the colored ones do not.

I actually picked the combo of deep red, deep blue and turquoise to match the combo of LEDs in the OCW. I was initially going to order OCWs but they were out of stock at the time so I decided to just go ahead and order the OCW components separately.

It looks to me like the 660 deep red should hit upper absorption peak of chlorophyll A quite well, and the 475nm deep blue will hit the lower absorption peak of chlorophyll B.



I realize that the 495nm turquoise isn't doing much for photosynthesis but I included those to try to balance out the overall color to white like the OCW supposedly does.

Regarding the low Vf for the red channel, is this really a problem (besides not using that Meanwell LDD to its full capacity)? I was under the impression that there is no lower Vf limit when using the meanwells or am I mistaken? Am I going to damage anything by having too few LEDs on that string?
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Old 09-05-2013, 05:11 PM   #7
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Here are some updates on the build.

For those of you who followed my stand build, you might know that I designed it with shoji style doors. I decided to make the housing in the style of a shoji lantern to match the theme of the stand.

Most of the frame is 1x2 poplar:



I made a lattice using 1/4" square dowel rods and made little notches so that they could interlock with cross-lap joints.



Here an assembled panel showing the inset dowels:



And here's the completed housing finished with two coats of dark brown paint and shoji paper

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Old 09-05-2013, 05:18 PM   #8
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The problem with getting the OCW colors in separate emitters is that unless you put them right next to each other in a triangle configuration you will not see the white light. Even putting them that close together will not guarantee them mixing.

The absorption peak for chloro b is more around 450nm than 475.

Also the problem will be penetration when hanging that high. Because the whites will have optics at the bottom of the tank you will see a focused beam of white with less color blending. I made the same mistake when I made my cannons and now I just have no optics but still manage to get over 100 PAR 2ft from the top.
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Old 09-05-2013, 05:19 PM   #9
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Instead of using a traditional heat sink I decided to just use some high quality 1" x 1/2" aluminum C-channel. This was much cheaper and lighter than a heat sink, and from my research it should be fine given my relative low density of LEDs in this build and the open nature of the housing.

I drilled two holes in each of the channels to attach them to the wooden fixture and then polished them up with some steel wool and removed any traces of grease and dirt by cleaning with acetone and 100% ethanol.



Here are all my supplies from my LEDGroupBuy order:



Here's the awesome little driver socket/controller combo from O2Surplus



and the other side with my Meanwell drivers plugged in

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Old 09-05-2013, 05:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gus6464 View Post
The problem with getting the OCW colors in separate emitters is that unless you put them right next to each other in a triangle configuration you will not see the white light. Even putting them that close together will not guarantee them mixing.
Bummer. I was hoping that clustering the colored LEDs close together would approximate the blending of the OCW but I guess I may have been wrong. If it looks terrible I might just not run the colored LEDs or order some OCWs to replace them.

Here's how I have the LEDs assembled. I have no experience with soldering, drilling or tapping, so I decided to go with the solderless LEDs and attached them to the aluminum channels with arctic alumina thermal epoxy.



I mounted them in a staggered configuration to try and maximize the spread and blending of the different colored LEDs.

1. Warm white LEDs
2. Cool white LEDs
3. Clustered colored LEDs
4. Warm white LEDs
5. Cool white LEDs

I wasn't as precise as I could have been when mounting the LEDs and the lack of symmetry in the layout is bothering me a little but hopefully it won't be that noticeable when the whole thing is on and running.
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Old 09-05-2013, 05:37 PM   #11
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Here they are channels all wired up and mounted in the fixture.



I currently have the 60 degree optics lightly siliconed onto most of the white LEDs but if it looks too spotlighty I can easily pull them off.

I suspended the fixture using a combination of hooks, chain and adjustable ratchet hangers attached to eye hooks screwed into the ceiling molding. It's a nice adjustable that works quite well but I think it looks a little ghetto so I've ordered some adjustable aircraft cable hangers, which will hopefully look a little more sleek and unobtrusive.

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Old 09-05-2013, 05:42 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_deeb View Post
Bummer. I was hoping that clustering the colored LEDs close together would approximate the blending of the OCW but I guess I may have been wrong. If it looks terrible I might just not run the colored LEDs or order some OCWs to replace them.

Here's how I have the LEDs assembled. I have no experience with soldering, drilling or tapping, so I decided to go with the solderless LEDs and attached them to the aluminum channels with arctic alumina thermal epoxy.



I mounted them in a staggered configuration to try and maximize the spread and blending of the different colored LEDs.

1. Warm white LEDs
2. Cool white LEDs
3. Clustered colored LEDs
4. Warm white LEDs
5. Cool white LEDs

I wasn't as precise as I could have been when mounting the LEDs and the lack of symmetry in the layout is bothering me a little but hopefully it won't be that noticeable when the whole thing is on and running.
You should be fine. Honestly I would recommend adding 2 more sets of OCW and not have an issue. Maybe add another bar with another set and lay it out like this:

warm
ocw
cool
warm
ocw
cool
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Old 09-05-2013, 06:53 PM   #13
jeffkrol
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LDD minimum input is 9V and you will be outputting 4-ish v on the red channel dissipating 1/2 input as heat.. no deal breaker just a small waste of efficiency..
since your dimming every channel adding 2 660nm red is a net zero for lumen output but a plus for efficiency..
Is it worth the bother??? Probably not..
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Old 09-05-2013, 07:46 PM   #14
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Blargh. I am very frustrated by my idiocy

Looks like I made a major mistake when hooking up the drivers. An astute eye will notice that I have the drivers plugged into the board in the wrong orientation (the Vin and Vout on the drivers are flipped relative to the board).



Unfortunately, my eye was not astute enough to notice this and I only realized it when I got an emergency PM from O2Surplus pointing this out and warning me not to plug in the power. Sadly, the warning came a little too late.

I had enthusiastically wired everything up and plugged it into the outlet. The power clicked on for a second, then there was a "pop" and one of the capacitors on the power supply blew out

Here's the power supply wired up and you might just be able to make out the white stuff that's leaked from the capacitor and pooled inside the enclosure.



I've got a new power supply on the way but I don't know if I also damaged the LDD drivers in the process. I guess I won't know till I try out the setup with the new power supply.

So close yet so far. Ugh.
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Old 09-05-2013, 09:35 PM   #15
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but I don't know if I also damaged the LDD drivers in the process. I guess I won't know till I try out the setup with the new power supply.
Now THAT really sucks..
Actually just test the drivers w/ a 9v battery and a few LED's in series w/ Vf of 9-ish..
Quote:
The capacity of your basic 9 volt carbon-zinc battery is about 400 milliamp-hours, which means it can supply a 40 milliamp load for 10 hours or a 10 milliamp load for 40 hours or an x milliamp load for y hours, as long as x times y is 400 milliamp-hours. These ratings are only approximate; the battery will not supply as many milliampere-hours to a heavy load.

(X)V DC out wall warts within capacity works as well..

After you are comfortable that your not going to blow anything else out.. just wire the dimmer into it and test as well I believe the LDD's don't need a signal at the dimmer to function (leave open)

Quote:
Leave open if not use
Power ON with dimming: DIM ~ -Vin >2.5 ~ 6VDC or open circuit
Power OFF : DIM ~ -Vin < 0.8VDC or short
YMMV
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