DIY Idea, hear me out
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:24 AM   #1
Patty LongD
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DIY Idea, hear me out


Hey all you party people I've read conclusive studies that indicate iron skillets release iron into the food we cook in them. Plants rely on iron, among other things, to grow as part of their fertilization. I'm sure you see where I'm going with this: fellas, couldn't we just boil a cup of water in a skillet, cool it, mix it etc and dump it in during our next water change?

I'm posting this in hopes of being proven wrong, so someone can catch me before making a mistake, so I'll pave the way for you: Either the exact variety of the iron that becomes absorbed into the boiled water is useless to plants i.e. overly or under magnetized or incorrectly bonded with H2O, or the iron is not going to make it into the plants because plants use roots versus leaves to take in iron i.e. tabs versus liquid fertilizers.

Or some new thing that I'm not scientific learned enough to personally conjure.

Or I'm a [censored]ing genius.

Lemme know, thanks ya'll.
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Old 09-03-2013, 09:19 AM   #2
aznartist34
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How will you know how much iron you're adding? Seems like a lot more work and possibly more expensive than buying dry form of iron fertilizer specifically for this purpose.
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Old 09-03-2013, 11:58 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aznartist34 View Post
How will you know how much iron you're adding? Seems like a lot more work and possibly more expensive than buying dry form of iron fertilizer specifically for this purpose.
+1

Also, would the iron even be in a chemical form that plants could readily use?
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Old 09-03-2013, 12:07 PM   #4
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Some brands of skillets "pre-season" their product. I'm not sure how they do this, but it is likely not good for fish and inverts.

Second, even if the first point is null, if this skillet has EVER been used, you should not use it. The beauty of cast-iron is it absorbs flavor (also a curse). You season them with salt and oil to make them non-stick (2 things you don't want in a tank). Then you cook a steak, or some chicken, or some bacon. The ideal way to clean a cast-iron is to wipe with a dry rag. You cannot use soaps or run in the washer. All those flavors, small remnants of food will be left over and will end up in your tank.

I would say let go of this idea.
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Old 09-03-2013, 01:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MondoBongo View Post
+1

Also, would the iron even be in a chemical form that plants could readily use?
I believe the iron being released from the skillet concept is iron oxide. From what I understand plants cannot readily use iron oxide.
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Old 09-03-2013, 01:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinkmonky View Post
I believe the iron being released from the skillet concept is iron oxide. From what I understand plants cannot readily use iron oxide.

People used to use rusty nails and scrap metal for iron. It has been more or less disproven, but I do recall reading something about some forms of iron being photo-available.

I don't know if that would be P+Fe's precipitate or simply a figment of my wild imagination...


Interesting topic none the less, and what if we all got iron pots purely for parboiling our mulberry leaves and such... No bacon grease to fret about then....
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Old 09-03-2013, 01:40 PM   #7
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I don't think this would be a good idea, but you're welcome to try it to prove everyone wrong.

Also you can use dishwashing soap for cast iron. I do it all the time. Just have to rinse it well so the next item doesn't have a soapy flavor.

Detergent is much harsher than soap, that's the stuff you should avoid using with cast iron unless you want to scrape down & reseason again.

After cleaning cast iron, I usually dry it out on the stove & apply a light coating of oil before it's put away in the cabinet.
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Old 09-03-2013, 01:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steven p View Post
People used to use rusty nails and scrap metal for iron. It has been more or less disproven, but I do recall reading something about some forms of iron being photo-available.

I don't know if that would be P+Fe's precipitate or simply a figment of my wild imagination...


Interesting topic none the less, and what if we all got iron pots purely for parboiling our mulberry leaves and such... No bacon grease to fret about then....
I've seen people use rusty screws, they all say it works, i don't believe anything so i don't know, this would be a good detailed experiment to run, as well as with the skillet, maybe i'll do some wabi-kusa with red plants in an iron pan, hmm
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Old 09-03-2013, 02:17 PM   #9
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Welllllll... I got interested, started googling, learned some new words ill never use in real life but...


http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...14579307004310
"2. Fe uptake
Plants have evolved two strategies to take up Fe from the soil non grasses activate a reduction-based Strategy I when starved for Fe whereas the grasses activate a chelation-based strategy."



Also, a small thread from tfh's forum on photoreduction... http://forums.tfhmagazine.com/viewto...p?f=91&t=26666

Anyone have any good reads bookmarked? I don't feel my terminology agrees with Google's hit based search system. Lots of Iron Man links... Hah
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Old 09-03-2013, 05:24 PM   #10
Patty LongD
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Brilliant, so we're looking at the initial problem of just not knowing if the chemical will be in the right state to which you guys recommend I just test it out and see or further research, AND the problem of either a brand new and very expensive skillet or an available but dirty skillet. Excellent, thanks, I'll keep reading up. And thanks for the articles you posted stevie p


Maybe you guys can advise here also, I know adding correct types of red clay can benefit the chemistry and substrate of the tank, I'm wondering if the clay will be as helpful if it has been cooked into pottery already. Could I put a there and get anything out of it? What if I broke it up into pieces and buried it? Or does it have to be soft?

Thanks again everyone
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Old 09-03-2013, 09:57 PM   #11
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I've heard the bit about people recommending cooking in an iron skillet to reduce anemia, but I'm a bit skeptical of this.

If you are using an iron skillet properly, it should have a nice, fairly thick layer of carbon on the bottom - this is what makes it non stick, and also serves to keep the food out of contact with the iron in the skillet.

And, say you are cooking in an unseasoned skillet, I'm also somewhat skeptical that the water would pick up more iron from the skillet then from the pipes and such it had to travel through to get to your tap.
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Old 09-04-2013, 02:55 AM   #12
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Plants take up nutrients as ions. So, iron, or Fe is not available to plants, nor is iron oxide, Fe(n)O(m), because those forms of iron don't dissociate in water and leave ionized iron in solution. The iron we dose needs to chelated, attached to an organic ion, that makes the iron available to the plants. Plain iron nails, etc. in the substrate can very slowly convert to a form available to plant roots, due I think to bacteria in the substrate. It just isn't an efficient process.
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Old 09-04-2013, 06:57 PM   #13
Patty LongD
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Thank you Hoppy I really like the explanation. Most informative.
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