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Old 08-29-2013, 11:48 PM   #1
jpappy789
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What happens to flies in my apartment


They get introduced to my other plants!

Drosera binata



Drosera capensis



Drosera nitidula

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Old 08-30-2013, 12:29 AM   #2
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An all you can eat 'fly' buffet, eh?

Nice collection (and variety) of Drosera.
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:50 AM   #3
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Thank you! The one in the nitidula wiggled its way out, and unfortunately damaged some of the tentacles. So, naturally, it was put into a N. x Miranda pitcher
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:53 AM   #4
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Very cool! Aren't they a bit difficult to keep though?
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:09 AM   #5
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Very cool! Aren't they a bit difficult to keep though?
You would think so, but many subtropical species of carnivorous plants are rather easy in my experience. Some (like the D. capensis) are quite bulletproof.

In general, all they require is good light, water low in TDS, and a bit of humidity. Media requirements may vary but my dews all do fine in a mixture of peat and silica sand and sometimes some long-fibered sphagnum, so things you can pick up at a store with a garden center.

Heck, there are several species that can be grown on a windowsill.
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:10 AM   #6
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Now that my friend is very interesting. Are these plants able to atract flies on there own, or are they mostly dependant on you? Is it true that some of these plants can attract flies by releasing a fragrance equivelent to rotting meat?
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:25 AM   #7
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Now that my friend is very interesting. Are these plants able to atract flies on there own, or are they mostly dependant on you? Is it true that some of these plants can attract flies by releasing a fragrance equivelent to rotting meat?
I think you might be referring to Amorphophallus or one of the "carrion flowers".

Drosera and Pinguicula are more opportunistic and catch whatever gets stuck in their dew, which probably looks pretty attractive to insects itself. Only some like D. capensis can actually curl their leaves to trap prey, or there are some that bend inward on themselves. Sarracenia and Nepenthes produce nectar though around the lips of their pitchers and have hairs inside that prevent insects from getting out, until they fall into the digestive fluids. Fly traps have trigger hairs and sense when to close their traps.

In an indoor environment they usually only get insects when I catch one. Although I did find a midge carcass in some overgrown D. adelae leaves when I was repotting recently. Outdoors and they can be full, you can find pictures of people who have slit open a dead Sarracenia pitcher to find tons of decomposing bodies. Unfortunately I haven't gotten the chance to grow any outside yet.
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:29 AM   #8
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What about overwintering? Do they require a cold dormant period? I've read that some carnivorous plants need this or will die in a year or so
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:57 AM   #9
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What about overwintering? Do they require a cold dormant period? I've read that some carnivorous plants need this or will die in a year or so
Carnivorous plants are found literally all over the world, excluding very arid environments and Antarctica...the seasonality is very different depending on the species.

Sarracenia, Dionaea, and some species of Drosera and Pinguicula are temperate and should get a dormant period from late fall to spring otherwise they don't last very long.

Some others also have similar dormant periods during seasons that are normally drier. My Mexican Pinguicula, for example, will sometimes alternate between carnivorous and succulent phases depending on the cues they get. Technically it should be every year but it doesn't always happen. Pygmy Drosera and tuberous Drosera are others that go dormant during the Australian dry season, which tends to be during our winters but they can be cued to do so during our summers.

Nepenthes and some other genera are completely tropical. They will grow continuously if given the right conditions. Most of my subtropical dews will too to some extent although the same plant may produce offshoots that will then continue growing. I've had my first few dew species (D. adelae, binata, capensis) for the last 3-4 years without not having at least something living to show for them. Some of the more tolerant species can go through periods of die back if stressed and then grow back from the roots. Again, not super hard to keep if given what they need.
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Old 08-30-2013, 02:05 AM   #10
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Awesome info, thanks. I've done a bit of reading into carnivorous plants as I'd like to have a few. But obviously haven't read enough. Any good sites or nooks you would recommend
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Old 08-30-2013, 02:30 AM   #11
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www.terraforums.com

Great forum, where I started out and continue to go back when I have questions. Very knowledgeable people there, although traffic can be a bit slow.

www.carnivorousplants.org

Site for the International Carnivorous Plant Society. They have some pretty good care info as well as a seed bank if you ever want to go that route. I haven't yet, but seems like a pretty neat deal.

www.growsundews.com

A hobbyist run site, I tend to default there if I need care info for specific Drosera species.

http://www.pinguicula.org/

Where I tend to go for specific Ping/butterwort info.

http://www.sarracenia.com/cp.html

Site by Barry Rice, lots of good beginner info there.

I also highly suggest getting the Savage Garden by Peter D'Amato, pretty much the bible for CP owners. Its been recently updated so I'm sure it's even better now.
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Old 08-30-2013, 09:08 AM   #12
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Thanks for all the info.
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Old 08-31-2013, 01:35 AM   #13
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No problem! Always willing to help anyone get into the CP hobby.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:49 PM   #14
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Great to see another CP-er here! I agree; a lot of these plants are rather hardy and easy. For anyone who is thinking about trying them out, go for it!

I love feeding mine flies and mosquitoes (man, that is so satisfying). I also have Sarracenia outside and they catch so many bugs, the pitchers will actually rot!
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:12 AM   #15
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Great, my friend Jason (it is Jason, isn't it ?) - I love it ! Just what I need at my house !
Thanks for posting that info.
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