Night-time soil aeration
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:07 AM   #1
CannaBrain
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Night-time soil aeration


Curious if anybody has experimented with this much? Set-up? Results? Maintenance? I will probably eventually give it a go anyways, but any input would be appreciated. I'm considering it for a more paludarium-type set-up to encourage a healthy atmosphere for bene bact, as well as root health.

Current idea involves a simple air pump, 1/8" tubing, and long airstones placed underneath heavy substrate areas. Would run it at lights out only, for a number of hours to be determined. I know most substrate-feeding plants don't appreciate water movement over their roots, but I don't intend on keeping terribly needy plants. Really curious to see the results anyhow.

Cheers for responses!
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:33 AM   #2
dprais1
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I ran across this a week or so ago, similiar concept.
Might help

http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/ug_jets.php
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:37 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dprais1 View Post
I ran across this a week or so ago, similiar concept.
Might help

http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/ug_jets.php

This is fantastic! Thanks for the info.
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:06 PM   #4
mstamper
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I am not sure I am seeing the upside of what you are trying to accomplish with this idea.

Plants of any kind root and those roots were not meant to be "aerated" in nature so why do this in your tank?

If you were running with artificial plants and needed to keep the mulm to a minimum in order to keep A/Nitrates/Nitrites down I can understand. But with live plants the breakdown of fish waste is important to their survival. That is why there is very little if any gravel cleaning in a planted tank. You are removing good plant food from your tanks.
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Old 04-10-2013, 07:34 PM   #5
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@dprais1, thank you for the link, but not quite what I'm going for.

@mstamper, thank you also for your input, though I disagree that gravel cleaning is not necessary. Obviously I don't go thru with a siphon and stir up the gravel, but I certainly remove all visible detritus from the surface. There is certainly enough gunk being broken down that my eyes cant see that keeps my plants happy. mulm traps = algae in experience. Think more hydroponics. In this case, I'm looking to increase the viable amount of bacteria i can get to colonize deep in my substrate to improve the health of the root's that do reach that far down w/ the addition of the proposed aeration. I'm planning on creating a paludarium, with some parts of the tank looking to get probably 8" - 10" of substrate, and that is where I would look to aim le bubbles. These would be mostly boggy plants, not full aquatics and the wands would be buried at the bottom of the land area, only go off at night so as not to further hinder co2 absorption for the aquatics, and would be pretty mild in their output. Again, not looking to keep anything that will be overly co2 needy submerged.

Anyways just an idea I'm thinking about experimenting w/ on a small scale, trying to avoid anaerobic areas in these deep substrate areas.

Again, thank you for you input! Cheers
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Old 04-12-2013, 05:01 PM   #6
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Was /am under the impression that plant's transport oxygen to the root's no matter how deep the substrate.
If they did not,do not do this,,then the plant's would suffer. IMHO
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Old 04-13-2013, 09:39 AM   #7
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I haven'y used a long airstone in a long time but it always seemed to me that with a small air pump only the section of stone right near the hook up ever produced bubbles.

With more pressure from a bigger pump then lots of bubbles all over.

I envision you wanting a gentle, non-disruptive stream of bubbles.

You should place your airstone in a bucket and then fill with gravel to what you imagine depth will be and try it out.
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Old 04-13-2013, 11:24 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CannaBrain View Post
....Think more hydroponics. In this case, I'm looking to increase the viable amount of bacteria i can get to colonize deep in my substrate to improve the health of the root's that do reach that far down w/ the addition of the proposed aeration....
Hydroponics works because the roots are in a heavy nutrient soup. The plants are not dependent on anaerobic bacteria to break down the organic matter in the substrate. Oxygen to the roots in Hydroponics using Ebb/Flow reduces/eliminates unneeded anaerobic bacteria.

You can not increase bacterial colonies as they are limited to food source supply. You can make an unfavorable environment for anaerobic bacteria bt that is counter productive as they are a vital part of the process of the breakdown of organics in a tank.

Pretty much all of our rooted aquatic plants thrive in nature in thick, organic based anaerobic muck.

This is not to say one can not grow aquatic plants Hydroponicaly as they are professional grown that way for the hobby. I'm currently raising Anubias in my Aquaponic Growbed.

I don't see a aerated substrate bed as feasible. I do encourage you to try it and create a journal as I would be interested in your results.
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Old 04-14-2013, 12:39 AM   #9
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I have a long airstoned strip along the backside of tank (submerged into substrate).

Runs 24/7, med valve setting, on hot days I crank it open 100%
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