Fertilizing a small tank and plant illness
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > General Planted Tank Forums > Planted Nano Tanks


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-31-2014, 07:15 AM   #1
static
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 3
Default

Fertilizing a small tank and plant illness


Hello everyone, this is my first post after skulking through threads on here for a few months. I have been getting more heavily invested in this hobby, and have been slowly converting my 5.5 gallon into a nice little planted tank for my betta and assassin snail. I have a few random questions regarding the fertilization process and the condition of one of my plants.

I purchased an anubias plant a couple weeks ago, and since then two of its leaves completely yellowed (which I removed), and another leaf that is doing the same thing. The yellowing starts at the stem and works its way up, and its affecting the leaves on either end of the plant working inwards. I am dosing only with seachem flourish, but what nutrients are considered macro and micro, and the need for co2 is very confusing to me. I understand that the flourish is more for micro elements, so what fertilizers would I need to complete the whole fertilizing spectrum? I have a large chunk of java moss in there, a fast growing java fern and the anubias in there. Is co2 necessary for this set up? And is adding a liquid carbon supplement as beneficial as injection? I would like to add a couple more plant varieties to the tank, and am planning to try a heavily planted one gallon, but I want to understand what nutrients the plants really need before I go any further.
static is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-31-2014, 02:10 PM   #2
domino
Algae Grower
 
domino's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 54
Default

I am not sure what is going on with the plant, but I can say that CO2 is not necessary with those plants. What is the Anubias attached to, and what kind of lighting do you have? I have had new Anubias lose a few leaves before as it adjusts to the water. Maybe that is what is going on here. Maybe someone with more expertise could weigh in.
__________________
domino is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 04:20 PM   #3
Raymond S.
Planted Tank Guru
 
Raymond S.'s Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Hot Springs Ar. 71901
Posts: 2,441
Default

Excel, or as you call it, liquid carbon will keep down on the algae. Doesn't work on all kinds and won't override rediculas amounts of light either. I have heard it said that it is about 60% as good as actual CO2 but I don't necessarilly believe that.
CO2 is found in air. It gets taken into the water much the same as Oxygen does.
You don't need it to be added it's already there. People who want fast growing plants artificially increase it either by a do-it-yourself(DIY) system for cheap or they get
a CO2 tank and valve and the rest of what goes/w it and it's then called "injected".
The plants you have I think would only look healthier, not grow by just a tad faster.
The fish food/waste does provide some nutrients. It can be suplimented in a tank that small by using Flourish Comprehensive and Tetra Pride. Look on e-bay and get some 1 ml Pipettes(real cheap) and start/w 1 ml Flourish and 2 ml Pride once a week.
What are you using for light ? It needs to be fairly low to keep from having algae.
A regular Anubia is going to be too large for that size tank. The Nana would be better.
Or the Nana Pettite. But that's just an opinion.
Search(in here) for Darkblade and he has a couple of threads about nutrients/CO2 and
light in the planted tank. Listed when you bring his name up in members search.
__________________
The shortest distance between any two points is a straight line...in the opposite direction...
Raymond S. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 01:12 AM   #4
Sajeev
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Fairfax, VA
Posts: 45
Default

i have see this with anubias. Cut away the rhizome closest to the next good joint where its yellowing. A picture will help diagnose better.
Sajeev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 10:15 AM   #5
static
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 3
Default

I have 10 watts of lighting for 5.5 gallons, so a little less than 2 watts per gallon, I assumed given that all of my plants have lower light requirements that would have been enough, I could buy a 15 watt, as that's the highest wattage my light will allow for. The light is on 8 hours a day as well. I'm pretty sure the anubias is a nana, i'll double check that though. That's good to know about the co2, but for macro nutrients would the plants I have benefit from the adding of iron and potassium supplements, on top of the flourish? I searched tetra pride, and it says it contains iron and potassium, as does the flourish, but many seem to add the additional iron and potassium. Is this more necessary for a heavily planted, larger aquarium?
static is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 10:23 AM   #6
FatherLandDescendant
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: In the hills of Eastern Kentucky, USA
Posts: 394
Default

The bottles label dosing is often inadequate, was in my case. I finally went to dry ferts, but you can use this nutrient calculator to figure out how much Flourish products to use to get better results.

http://rota.la/

Oh yea the Anubis needs its' tubular rhizome above the substrate or it will die.
FatherLandDescendant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 01:37 PM   #7
Raymond S.
Planted Tank Guru
 
Raymond S.'s Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Hot Springs Ar. 71901
Posts: 2,441
Default

Is that a regular aquarium incandescent bulb ? A CFL bulb?
__________________
The shortest distance between any two points is a straight line...in the opposite direction...
Raymond S. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 03:05 PM   #8
static
Newbie
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 3
Default

the rhizome is above the substrate, its lightly tied to a rock cave, and it's a regular incandescant
static is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 04:50 PM   #9
Raymond S.
Planted Tank Guru
 
Raymond S.'s Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Hot Springs Ar. 71901
Posts: 2,441
Default

Find one of those mini CFL bulbs that is 4000K but not over 7000K. You may have a heat problem with it and need to find a couple of blocks of wood about 1"x1" that are long enough to go across the top from front to back at each end and put the light up on them. I had a 10g tank and I used a 60W incandescent bulb on it. Was a bit much but the plants(and algae) grew fine. So that 10W bulb is not enough. The CFL should be between 10 and 15W. They produce much more light than the incandescent bulbs do at the same Watts.
__________________
The shortest distance between any two points is a straight line...in the opposite direction...
Raymond S. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 09:56 PM   #10
FatherLandDescendant
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: In the hills of Eastern Kentucky, USA
Posts: 394
Default

You can get 10w 6700k CFL (the curly type) bulbs at wallymart in a 3 pack for less than $10. Look on the box of most bulbs will tell you the k rating.
FatherLandDescendant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2014, 12:51 AM   #11
kidgrave
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 272
Default

Static, you remind me of me when I first started in this hobby. I was very confused about co2 and nutrients.

As far as your lights go, what fixture are you using? You can always purchase CFL bulbs from Home Depot. You can guy a 4 pack of 6500k bulbs for $8.

When it comes to nutrients, you need to be concerned about NPK, and trace elements.
When I was new to this hobby, I was confused about dosing nutrients, so I took a shortcut and did things the easy way. I setup my tank using 1 inch of Miracle Gro Organic Choice potting mix, and 1 inch of gravel on top. The soil has all the nutrients necessary for growing plants, and it also leeches the nutrients to the water column. In my opinion, you should consider a soil substrate, specially if you just want to grow low light plants, and don't want to deal with the headache of trying to figure what fertilizers you need to dose.

Once you have your soil substrate, basically, you just need to worry about how much light your plants are getting. The more light your plants get, the more co2 and nutrients they require.
__________________

Last edited by kidgrave; 09-02-2014 at 12:52 AM.. Reason: typo
kidgrave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2014, 01:00 AM   #12
Zapins
Wannabe Guru
 
Zapins's Avatar
 
PTrader: (19/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Harrogate, TN
Posts: 1,626
Default

Please post a close up picture of the damaged anubias part.

Also, is the rhizome on the plant soft or mushy?
Zapins is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012