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Old 12-13-2013, 04:50 AM   #46
wastewater
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Thanks hedge_fund! Sorry about the late reply.

And thanks, bandersnatch! Welcome to TPT, a great (and diversified) site with a vast array of knowledgeable members. I use 18 gauge green enamel annealed floral wire (pack of 70 pcs. 18" long for about $3). Easy for me to bend and shape, along with handling the weight of my plants. Good choice for my applications because the plants are always dry when they are in their wire mounts.

If the tillies were to be misted or wet, I would use aluminum wire with a heavier gauge (easy to bend and shape with good support). The ultimate wire material would be stainless steel, but wow, ss is really a "bear" to work with. The moss/lichen I'm using is Cladonia rangiferina, aka: reindeer moss or reindeer lichen... used completely for cosmetic purposes... pleasing to 'my' eye. Not alive because there is no water introduced into the enclosures (my plants are watered outside of the enclosures).
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Old 12-13-2013, 04:56 AM   #47
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T. paleacea apurimacensis coming into bloom & throwing a spike






T. ionantha (Guatemala) in bloom

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Old 12-14-2013, 07:15 PM   #48
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Hey, thanks for your quick answer! I ended up getting some heavier aluminium wire, so hopefully that goes well.

Your paleacea looks amazing! I haven't gotten mine to bloom yet, but of course it could just be too young.
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Old 12-25-2013, 01:53 AM   #49
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Wow! This is an awesome thread. I had been doing a lot of reading on keeping bromeliads before I found this... Now I know for sure I will be adding a set up similar to this sometime soon!
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Old 12-25-2013, 05:18 PM   #50
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Thanks for the kind words, bandersnatch. I'm sure that (with some time) your "paleacea" will reward you. Many species take a long time to mature and bloom. Although there are ways to induce faster blooming, I always prefer mother nature taking its course. T. xerographica is one species in my collection that has taken years to mature, and still has not bloomed to date. The leafs are finally starting to develop some rosy pink/red coloration which is a nice contrast to the silver/white color.

Appreciate the compliment, johnson18! Tillandsia really are enjoyable plants, and a lot of fun to work with. So many species to choose from... and so many different shapes with varying colors of green, silver and white. Their blooms are very pleasing to the eye (some are short lived, others last a long time, and some have very strong fragrances). Another plus is the ease of reproduction via offsets (pups, clones). Raising from seed can be quite the challenge - requiring a lot of patience - a slow process but very rewarding in the end.

Another T. ixiodies x aeranthos in full flower mode

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Old 02-20-2014, 05:37 PM   #51
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A few more recent blooms

T. tenuifolia 'emerald forest'


T. ionantha 'rosita' in blush

Flowering


T. crocata v. tristis


Added some 9w cob's to the existing light arrays, and have been pleased with the additional intensity.
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Old 02-21-2014, 10:36 PM   #52
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Those are some great looking plants! I've had a few different blooms recently as well. I will try to get some pictures up. A few species have not done so well though.

How much light are you using over these systems? I am ready to upgrade my lights now and haven't decided what to go with. I may move one of my t5ho fixtures over or might get an led fixture specifically for my Tillandsia.
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Old 02-22-2014, 03:21 AM   #53
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Johnson18, thanks! Decided to take a bit of a break (filling out taxes, not one of my favorite tasks by any means... it's going to be a long weekend), so I thought this would be a good opportunity to respond back while I have the time.

What species are not doing so well for you? Any ideas as to the culprit?

I really can't give you a definite answer about how much light I'm using, other than it appears to be bright. I borrowed a LightScout (Spectrum Technologies) quantum meter to measure par levels about a year ago. Although I cannot remember the exact numbers, par was fairly high all the way down to the substrate levels ~ down to about 26". I can easily position my plants at different heights beneath/under the lights. This works out well for my white, grey, & silver Tillies (eg., albida, paleacea, tectorum). They really enjoy bright light, along with plenty of air circulation.

Most of my set-ups have been converted to LED (except for one that still uses t5ho). I've been dilly-dallying around with the LED build for that one, but hopefully it will all come together in the coming weeks. Have found that a mixture of 6500k & 660nm red (with a mix of 4:1 ~ white:red) has proven to be very favorable.

Here's one of the four heat sinks I'll be using for the DIY arrays. Made with aluminum flat bar, aluminum 'L' trim, and aluminum channel. Outside is painted. Had to use a hack saw for the cuts, so it's not perfect - but hey, it works (and works very well: passively manages thermal heat).


T. paleacea (lg. form) coming into bloom, this one is positioned closer to the light.



T. paleacea apurimacensis also positioned closer to the light. Cut the flower stalk off a couple weeks ago. Three pups are growing near the base of the cut stalk.
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Old 03-17-2014, 06:11 PM   #54
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Couple of updates:

T. ionantha rubra in bloom


30" x 20" x 30" display


T. ionantha 'tall velvet' in bloom


Recent LED builds (rectangular)





Bar


LED bar (between t5ho GE starcoat daylights & D-D Giesemann aquaflora)

Last edited by wastewater; 03-23-2014 at 04:00 PM.. Reason: x
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Old 03-18-2014, 06:50 AM   #55
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Hey that's looking great! Nice job with the DIY and the plants.

I've been working on the idea on a growout for potted plants that is more like a display with neat and tidy with plants arranged in a pleasing way. I have this 37G fish tank that I set up for bonsai bamboos, ferns, mosses and a few other things. I repotted most of the plants in terra cottas or small bonsai pots. I like it. We have it in our study. I am trying to figure out a tile bottom or something else more attractive than that white eggcrate.

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Old 03-18-2014, 04:28 PM   #56
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Wow. Wastewater never realized Tillies could be so beautiful both in and out of flowers. I may need to add some as companions to my orchids. Do they attract mealy bugs? It looks like they would have many hiding places and be well camouflaged. Also the lower humidity 20%+/- is ideal for them.
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Old 03-18-2014, 05:02 PM   #57
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Hydrophyte ~ your grow-out display is a very nice idea, with an interesting assortment of plants! I like the terra cotta pots along with the ease (and option) of being able to easily move and reposition your plants around. The eggcrate doesn't seem to distract from your display of plants (to 'my eye' anyway) and appears to function as a level support. Maybe you could paint the eggcrate a different color to get away from the white. A unique tile bottom may just be the ticket, though!

The LEDs have really allowed me to easily tweak spectrum and intensity, especially for my vertical set-ups that start getting more than 22" high. Part of the beauty in regards to DIY Leds, is having the ability to customize the lighting for your applications. You don't really have to 'break the bank' in the process if you are are creative and do your homework. Is your 37G about 24" high? What are you lighting up your display with?

Thanks KenP, appreciate the comments. Tillies are great orchid companions. Unfortunately, (yes) they are prone to mealy bugs. I've been lucky, I guess, and never had to deal with the dreaded mealys'. What type of orchids do you have in your collection, and what species do you enjoy working with most?
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:11 PM   #58
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WW, i have been collecting/growing orchids for about two years so my collection is not that large. In general I have species, minitures and mounted plants. Leptotes, Aerangis, Angraecum, Dendrobiums, Bulbophyllum... Favorite? Terete leaved species. I am a cacti and succulent fan. So if the orchid looks succulent i am a fan.
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Old 03-19-2014, 03:47 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenP View Post
WW, i have been collecting/growing orchids for about two years so my collection is not that large. In general I have species, minitures and mounted plants. Leptotes, Aerangis, Angraecum, Dendrobiums, Bulbophyllum... Favorite? Terete leaved species. I am a cacti and succulent fan. So if the orchid looks succulent i am a fan.

Sounds like a very nice & diverse collection! I don't dabble much with orchids now-a-days, but have done very well in the past with some Cattelyas, Encyclias, Epipendrums, Laelias, and an Austrailian Dendrobium (D. kingianum) in low humidity conditions. Papilionanthe teres has been one of those orchids that has always 'flipped my switch', along with Brassavola nodosa, and Docknillia wassellii.
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Old 03-19-2014, 10:35 PM   #60
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Papilionanthe teres is just too large. I have the Brasso and the Dockrilla is on my to buy list. I also have several ant plants as companion plants.
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