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Old 08-20-2013, 09:33 PM   #31
wastewater
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Tillarium blooms


Wanted to add a brief update. My switch over to LED lighting seems to have been very beneficial for my Tillandsia. Growth, flowering, and reproduction is favorable. Started testing/using LEDs as a supplemental light source for my plants a couple years ago. Was skeptical at first, and knew it would take both 'hands-on-experience', along with time and patience to find out what LEDs could do. Previously, I was using PCs, T5HOs, metal halides, and spiral CFLs as an artificial light source. All have proven to perform well for my plants. But, after some tweaking & trial error with the LEDs, I've been very pleased with their performance. I have no scientific data, just what I have experienced/seen in regards to plant performance.

Ionanthas seem to have stronger blushes and flowers under the LEDs




Started testing by using small prototype fixtures and experimenting with color spectrum. Used small 8"L x 4"W x 3"H fixtures to observe Tilly performance on a few small set-ups, before committing to switch overs with larger fixtures on my larger set-ups

Small testing fixtures (different spectrums, diodes & wattages)

Neutral white

Cool white

White and 660nm red



Light over plants

Cool white

Neutral white

Mixture of whites & 660nm red



Simple, inexpensive, 8 x 3w small fixture build (driving @700ma)

Wooden enclosure box w/vent holes & alum. framework for heat sinks

Heat sinks & LED stars

Fan added (not really needed, but keeps fixture extremely cool)

Completed fixture

Last edited by wastewater; 09-11-2013 at 02:39 PM.. Reason: 8 x 3w fixture build
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Old 08-20-2013, 10:39 PM   #32
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Very cool! Really like the setup you've got
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Old 08-20-2013, 11:42 PM   #33
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Stunning man. Absolutely beautiful
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Old 09-05-2013, 10:06 AM   #34
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Just picked up 1/2 a dozen of these - would throwing them in a fish tank for a while work as a soak? does hardness /ph matter?
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Old 09-05-2013, 03:36 PM   #35
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Thanks jpappy789 & tattooedfool83... your comments are much appreciated!


Morrie: were you able to obtain them in your area? You should be okay with a soak in the tank. You could also use a separate container (this would keep anything on the plants, such as any fertilizers if any, from entering into your aquarium if you want to be extra cautious).

Regarding ph and hardness; personally I don't think your plants will care either way as long as your water is not on the "very" extreme end of acid/alkaline. I believe using really hard water would eventually start leaving chalky/white deposits behind on the plants over the course of time. There are many varying opinions pertaining to the subject of water and Tillandsia (using only rainwater, R/O water, minerals & lack of minerals, only using acidic water, etc.). Is one opinion better than the other, and is there a correct way to water Tillandsia? I don't think so. What ever works best for you and your plants is "the best way".

My indoor Tillies are soaked in de-chlorinated tap water once a week for 3-4 hours. Outdoor Tillies are sprayed with the hose (chlorinated water straight from the tap) when needed - usually because of the lack of rain. Both indoor and outdoor plants thrive using plain 'ole' tap water. Good luck with your new additions (very easy plants to work with) and keep us posted.
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:41 PM   #36
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Absolutely incredible - thank you so much for sharing.
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Old 09-16-2013, 02:44 PM   #37
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Very nice setup! I keep killing mine. From reading your thread, it seems like I never have enough air movement to dry them back out after their soaking. How do you 'soak' all your plants? Do you actually take all of them out of your display, soak, and replace them? Sounds very dedicating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wastewater View Post
All my indoor Tillies get a 4-hour soak once a week, never bother with misting. The exception to this: some very small seedlings that were recently germinated ~ they get an additional 1-hour soak twice a week, along with the weekly soak (will discontinue the extra soaks once the seedlings gain some size). I also add a diy fertilizer to my soak water. Macros are heavier on the potassium side.
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Old 09-16-2013, 05:46 PM   #38
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Thanks, Wy Renegade!


Quote:
Originally Posted by ipkiss View Post
Very nice setup! I keep killing mine. From reading your thread, it seems like I never have enough air movement to dry them back out after their soaking. How do you 'soak' all your plants? Do you actually take all of them out of your display, soak, and replace them? Sounds very dedicating.
Thank-you, ipkiss! Tillandsia do take some dedication. If you give them what they need, they will definitely reward you (i.e., flowering and reproduction). Sorry to hear about your Tillies. As to your questions, this is what works/and is easiest for me. For my indoor Tillandsia (especially because of the quantity of plants I work with) I remove the plants & soak them in buckets of dechlorinated tap water (diluted diy ferts are also added to the soak water). After soaking, the plants are spread out (usually on newspaper) to dry off for an hour or so. They are then repositioned in the set-ups. I usually dedicate about 4 hours a week with soaks and maintenance (maintenance usually involves cleaning glass, cutting off an occasional dead leaf, removing 'spent' flowers, dividing pups when needed, and cleaning off dust build-ups on the circulation fans). My Tillies are not mounted permanently. Removal and repositioning is quite simple.

That 'ole' saying, "a picture is worth a thousand words", rings true. So on that note...

Plants soaking in buckets



Some set-ups with the plants removed




Set-ups with plants repositioned





Average relative humidity within the set-ups with lights on (photo-periods are 10 to 11 hours during spring and summer, 9 hours in fall & winter)

Last edited by wastewater; 09-17-2013 at 09:17 PM.. Reason: photos
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Old 09-18-2013, 07:01 PM   #39
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Wow! Your dedication is definitely worthy of your tillies reward of resplendent beauty!

Thanks for showing me pictures of what you do. From this, I'm pretty sure mine didn't make it due to stagnant air and/or too much moisture. The first one I had, I bought at an orchid show so I simply kept with my orchids and they got sprayed when the orchids got sprayed and dried when the orchids dry. Except, sometimes the orchids don't dry out if its a rainy week. (Heh, heh, the orchids love that!) This one lasted a while actually but I don't think it ever reproduced and died off.

The second one I had came in a little glass bell from lowe's during Christmas. The instructions said to soak it once or twice a week and empty out. The problem was there was probably too much "moss" glued around the tilly and this undoubtedly kept the moisture in and rotted it out as well.
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Old 10-20-2013, 05:38 AM   #40
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Tillandsia ionantha (Mexican form) in flower





Seedlings from a T. ionantha x T. stricta cross



Pollinated from the flowers of this T.ionantha 'tall velvet' and a soft grey form of T. stricta


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Old 11-16-2013, 08:13 PM   #41
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can you recommend any good texts on keeping Tillandsia
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Old 11-17-2013, 04:00 AM   #42
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You know Morrie, I really don't know. Most of the Tillandsia books I've read are more like photo alblums. They seem to be fairly comprehensive about the subject: describing each plant's growth habits, their habitat, distribution, inflorescence, and some comments about their culture. Some of the more recent books --- Paul Isley (with Rainforest Flora out of California); Tillandsia: The Worlds Most Unusual Airplants {1997, 256 pg} & Tillandsia ll: The Worlds Most Unusual Airplants {2010, 287 pg} - Jan Maruska (Czech Republic); The World of Tillandsias {2011, 96 pg} - H. Shimizu & H. Takizawa (Japan); Tillandsia Handbook {1st edition 1992, 36 pg ~ 2nd edition 1998, 134 pgs} - and Derek Butcher (Derek & Margaret have one of the largest Tillandsia collections in Australia); An Amateur's Guide to the Greyish Leaved Tillandsioideae {1st edition 1992, 80 pg ~ 2nd edition 1992, 88 pg ~ 3rd edition 1994, 70pg}.

As to the subject of "keeping" Tillandsia... there is always the web... if you have the time/patience to sift through and carefully weigh out the information. Don't always believe everything you read on the web, and take it with a grain of salt. There is a lot of untrue/conflicting information on the subject floating around in cyber space - along with the "it can only be done this way", "that's impossible", or "it's too difficult" scenarios.
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Old 11-17-2013, 04:12 AM   #43
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Coming into bloom

T. ixioides x aeranthos (throwing a spike)



T. araujei 'open form' (throwing a spike)


Starting to flower

Last edited by wastewater; 11-22-2013 at 09:49 PM.. Reason: picture added
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Old 11-17-2013, 02:34 PM   #44
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very cool
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Old 12-13-2013, 12:25 AM   #45
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These are absolutely beautiful; I joined this site right after seeing them, so thank you for sharing.

Do you mind if I ask what kind of wire that is? I need something similar--something that holds its shape with a bit of weight, and I guess I'm not sure what I'm looking for. Also, what sort of moss/lichens are you using? Are they alive?
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