Differences In Cory species
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Old 12-24-2012, 06:50 PM   #1
Stinkmonky
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Differences In Cory species


Hey everyone. I'm considering cory cats for an algae crew in the future. What species is most commonly used for algae cleaning. Also id like to know how sensitive they are to water chemistry.
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Old 12-24-2012, 06:58 PM   #2
CytoEric
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In my experience corys are pretty hardy. However you do need to keep an eye on your water quality because poor conditions will cause their barbels to fall off. They seem to prefer fine sand, but many people keep them on smooth gravel with no issues. I don't think they eat algae, they are bottom feeding omnivores. In the wild they're mostly meat eaters, but do eat some veggies. Mine seem to enjoy algae tabs as much as shrimp pellets.

Also I don't think there is much of a difference between the various species beyond cosmetics. They're fun and cute, but if you want algae eaters I think I'd look to another fish.
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Old 12-24-2012, 07:06 PM   #3
Diana
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Cories are not algae eaters.
They search through the substrate for higher protein items like worms.

Several Loricariads are good algae eaters. What size is the tank? What other fish do you have?
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Old 12-24-2012, 07:12 PM   #4
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I just realized I said cory and I meant otos >.<
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Old 12-24-2012, 07:18 PM   #5
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Oh.
The difference is often price.

The most commonly available Oto is cheapest. They are very good algae eaters.
More expensive ones like Zebras are good algae eaters, too, but not better, unless you are looking for the unusual coloring.

Similar in size to Otos are Paraotocinclus and Pitbull Plecos. Any of these can work in tanks as small as 10 gallons.

Larger fish that are 'best' for algae are Rubber lips (20 gallon minimum), and larger than them are Bristlenose Plecos (40 gallon minimum). There are several species of BN, and some variations like albino and long fin. These variations are all good for algae. If you have access to some of the more unusual Ancistrus (Bristlenose) I am not sure how each one ranks for algae, but they sure are interesting!

Look at Planet Catfish for more info.
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Old 12-24-2012, 10:11 PM   #6
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Default Algae Controlling Crew

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinkmonky View Post
Hey everyone. I'm considering cory cats for an algae crew in the future. What species is most commonly used for algae cleaning. Also id like to know how sensitive they are to water chemistry.
Hello S...

I keep a lot of Corys and mine aren't much for eating algae. They prefer sinking food like frozen brine and mysis shrimp, bloodworms, plankton and krill. They'll eat vegetable matter on the bottom if that's all that's available. I've seen them in a group consume a fish that recently died, but they're particular about their meat.

If you want a good algae eating crew, I'd suggest a few "Ramshorn" snails. They're the real tank cleaners. They'll clean up all decayed plant and fish material. I keep them in all my planted tanks.

A word of caution, if you overfeed your fish, like the majority of fishkeepers do, you'll have the snails piled up in the corners of your tank. Feed sparingly, and your snail population will be manageable and help keep your tank clean.

Just a couple of thoughts.

B
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