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Old 10-21-2012, 10:37 PM   #1
hotrodprincess
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drift wood?


Where does everyone get drift wood? the pet store near us does not carry it. We want a piece that we could use to make a tree out of for our 3 gallon tank. We are new to planted tanks and aquariums (we have a betta in our tank) I have no idea where to look for a piece and I don't want to spend a lot on it.
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:41 PM   #2
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i picked mine up at a local lake
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:41 PM   #3
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The swap n shop
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:45 PM   #4
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If I did happen to find a piece at a local river what do I have to do to it to be able to use it in my tank. What about a tree root from a fallen tree that's dryed out sunned and weathered for a while. Is there any certain type that should be avoided?
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:48 PM   #5
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Avoid woods that are for reptiles as some are not for aquarium use.
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Old 10-21-2012, 10:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotrodprincess View Post
If I did happen to find a piece at a local river what do I have to do to it to be able to use it in my tank. What about a tree root from a fallen tree that's dryed out sunned and weathered for a while. Is there any certain type that should be avoided?


Boil it for an hour or so, that'll kill any yucky stuff you wouldn't want in your tank. After I boiled mine the water looked like tea, I'm glad all that didn't seep into my tank.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:04 PM   #7
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The darkness in the water comes from the tannins in the driftwood. These are actually healthy for fish; many people clear them out because they don't like the look of the tea-colored water, but they are not actually harmful.

Boiling the driftwood to remove pests isn't a bad idea, though. Just be careful to monitor your water after you put it in to make sure nothing is changing drastically.
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"Aquariums are like science, art, and hypno-therapy, all rolled into one," I insisted.
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My aquascape style tends towards 'tall in the back, short in the front, lots and lots of green and stuff. And maybe a rock somewhere...'
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:13 PM   #8
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The darkness in the water comes from the tannins in the driftwood. These are actually healthy for fish; many people clear them out because they don't like the look of the tea-colored water, but they are not actually harmful.

Boiling the driftwood to remove pests isn't a bad idea, though. Just be careful to monitor your water after you put it in to make sure nothing is changing drastically.
thanks for the information I dont think I would care for the tea colored water so I will probably boil it to clean it and get rid of some of the tannins.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:15 PM   #9
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It's entirely a personal choice Do a forum search for 'driftwood' and you'll find all kinds of information about finding, buying, or otherwise sourcing driftwood.
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My aquascape style tends towards 'tall in the back, short in the front, lots and lots of green and stuff. And maybe a rock somewhere...'
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:35 AM   #10
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The only sure way I know to avoid the problems of tannins is to get truly dry wood. This is harder to do than many think. Dry does not mean simply dry to the touch or dead for a couple years. Much depends on what form of wood you want. If you want thin, they dry faster. Heavy thicker pieces take many years to dry naturally. Use a small saw to cut the end off a piece you might like. It should have a pretty uniform color all the way through. Around knots and limbs may have some difference but this is okay in many cases.


I like to look around the shore of lakes as this is where wood goes on the ground to dry and then may go back in the water. After repeating this cycle for many years the wood is then truly dry but still solid without rot.
I have never found wood with bark still on that was truly dry and free of tannins.

To narrow the search, try using mapping like Google maps. Zero in on the shore of a local lake and search for piles of wood. The North and East shore coves is often a good place due to prevailing winds in the US. If you can see wood in aerial photos, there is a lot there that you can't see!

Then get some hiking boots.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:43 AM   #11
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The only sure way I know to avoid the problems of tannins is to get truly dry wood. This is harder to do than many think. Dry does not mean simply dry to the touch or dead for a couple years. Much depends on what form of wood you want. If you want thin, they dry faster. Heavy thicker pieces take many years to dry naturally. Use a small saw to cut the end off a piece you might like. It should have a pretty uniform color all the way through. Around knots and limbs may have some difference but this is okay in many cases.


I like to look around the shore of lakes as this is where wood goes on the ground to dry and then may go back in the water. After repeating this cycle for many years the wood is then truly dry but still solid without rot.
I have never found wood with bark still on that was truly dry and free of tannins.

To narrow the search, try using mapping like Google maps. Zero in on the shore of a local lake and search for piles of wood. The North and East shore coves is often a good place due to prevailing winds in the US. If you can see wood in aerial photos, there is a lot there that you can't see!

Then get some hiking boots.
Thanks for the information. We have a river near by so we will try there first and see what turns up. May be we will get lucky and find a great piece.
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:32 AM   #12
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A river can be a good place, too. When they rise and fall during heavy rains, dead wood is tossed up in piles. If you can take some wading and have a small saw on hand it will help. don't bother digging too much as the stuff on the bottom will likely stay wet and rot. What you need is the stuff that stays up so it gets air and doesn't get the bugs and fungus that wood on the ground will. If you like the small branch types, try looking around where flooding occurs. There may be some good stuff hanging where the high water left it in trees up off the ground.
Another spot to consider is fields where people may have cut off small sprouts and left the stump to dry and weather. Some of those are neat if you can wrestle them out of the ground.

Fun trip if you are in the right frame of mind and the weather is nice. I'm waiting for the weather to cool and then will be heading out to my favorite spot.
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:46 AM   #13
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There is a guy named PC1 on here that sells awesome pieces of Driftwood, check him out.
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:26 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlantedRich View Post
A river can be a good place, too. When they rise and fall during heavy rains, dead wood is tossed up in piles. If you can take some wading and have a small saw on hand it will help. don't bother digging too much as the stuff on the bottom will likely stay wet and rot. What you need is the stuff that stays up so it gets air and doesn't get the bugs and fungus that wood on the ground will. If you like the small branch types, try looking around where flooding occurs. There may be some good stuff hanging where the high water left it in trees up off the ground.
Another spot to consider is fields where people may have cut off small sprouts and left the stump to dry and weather. Some of those are neat if you can wrestle them out of the ground.

Fun trip if you are in the right frame of mind and the weather is nice. I'm waiting for the weather to cool and then will be heading out to my favorite spot.
We live in the Forest there is usually lots of trees down in the river. We have a lot of down trees on our property too that have been down for about 6 + years now I just did not know I could use something like that. I always assumed it had to come from the water. I think the girls will have a great time hunting for a piece either hear or at the river. I hope we can find something great to make our tree out of. we already found a great place for red granite(its all over where we live and about the only rock I can identify lol) we just have to decided what size will look the best. our moss will be hear this week. So I am hoping to find our drift wood soon.
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Old 10-22-2012, 03:18 PM   #15
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Sounds like you have several good spots. Don't get all hung up on details. What type of tree it was when living has little to do with whether it is usable once dead and totally dry. Try to keep an open mind when looking for wood. It is real easy to look at a great piece and think it is too big or has some defect. If you have a saw, many of those defects can be sawed off or stuck in the substrate. The saw you carry is to get it down to a size to carry but when you get it home, you can reshape a lot of things. Don't worry about color too much either. Dry wood will change color once it soaks in the tank.
I do an overnight bleach soak just to clear any potential pests or pollution. A simple rinse to dilute the bleach and then an air dry will give you good insurance. Boiling a piece that may be three feet long just isn't practical and does nothing for any oil that it might be holding.
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