210 gallon 7x2x2 low light w/ CO2
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Old 09-08-2012, 02:58 PM   #1
canlax
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210 gallon 7x2x2 low light w/ CO2


Hi All,

I have been keeping rift lake cichlids for a while and my fiance and I have decided to add a centrepiece tank in our living room. Right now we are thinking of going with a planted tank with discus (going to give it a shot anyways!). If discus doesn't work out we will go with something more hardy and better adapted to our well water.

We purchased a 84"x24"x24" Oceanic 210 gallon used with Oceanic 250 Trickle Filter sump. We are not in a rush just want to document how we are making out with the tank and hopefully get some good insight/suggestions from the community.

This tank was originally designed to be a room divider as it has the overflow at one end with 2 drains and 2 returns. It would be nice to have overflows on both ends but I don't want to drill more holes so will have to make this work.

Question 1: What system is best for keeping a quiet overflow with 2 drains and 2 returns as shown below?

Question 2: The black stick on coating that is on the end with the overflow seems to be removable but I don't want to take it off and have it looking worse - anyone see any issues taking this off? Also is there any suggestions to adjust the overflow to push it further back so give more room at the side of the tank for viewing. I was thinking of going with a coast to coast overflow along the top and have exposed piping to the drilled holes which would eventually be hidden by plants. This way I could remove the current overflow - thoughts?

The stand is in decent shape but needs a little work to clean it up and keep it organized. The canopy however is not what I want. Does anyone see a way to salvage the canopy in the picture below or do you think I would better off just building a new one? I would like one that is hinged for easy access and also to house the lighting without having light escaping out the top of the canopy on the wall.










Last edited by canlax; 10-10-2013 at 02:03 AM.. Reason: title change
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Old 09-19-2012, 12:08 AM   #2
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OK so over the past 2 weeks we have refinished the stand with black stain. We added some door hardware and refinished the bottom for a cleaner look as the previous owner had allowed water to damage the wood. We also have painted the back of the tank with a semi-gloss black. I had some friends over for the weekend so put the boys to work to help me bring this monster inside (it ain't light!).

Now that it is inside I am inspecting the tank a little more and am concerned with the silicone seams. They have a black/green mold/algae/fungus? that is below the silicone yet the seam seems to be tight to the glass. I am considering redoing the inner seams even thought I hate the idea of doing it. Other than being a little unsightly - should I be concerned with how long this seam may last? Overall the structural seams *appear* to be defect free.



Here is the tank set up in the living room. We still have some wall repainting to do before filling the tank.





Next 2 projects will be modifying the canopy to house lighting and refinished for a new, clean look and modifying the Oceanic trickle filter 250 to better perform as a sump with CO2 use. Wish me luck!

Any input or positive encouragement is appreciated!
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Old 09-19-2012, 01:14 AM   #3
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Looks great. I like the dark tank and stand against the rich colored wall.

My 8' foot tank is a bit too large for my 10' wall and the 5' tank was a bit too small. I think a 7' tank would be just right! Not an easy size to find though. Your future discus will love the room and you have room for a couple of other big schools of fish too.

I wouldn't mess with a coast to coast as you can do a herbie with two returns for a quiet overflow with the overflow as is. Put a ball or gate valve on one drain and have the other taller. Run the working drain full by adjusting the valve and there won't be ANY water noise at all.

Too bad about the canopy. The stand looks really nice though.

You might consider centering the tank on the wall or at least leaving some room on either side. It is going to be the centerpiece of the room and the room might look off with such a large item pushed into the corner.
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Old 09-19-2012, 04:31 AM   #4
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Floor reinforcement? Thats around 1 ton of weight on a raised foundation. I had to add another 4x6 and I posts under my 210 since my floor was like a trampoline without it. 1 ton and 210+ gallons of water with a sump is not something to skimp on floor stability with

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Old 09-19-2012, 05:06 AM   #5
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I'm considering bean animals stand pipes: http://reefcentral.com/forums/showth...5&pagenumber=1

This requires 3 drain holes and one return. Quite and redundant.
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Old 09-19-2012, 06:25 AM   #6
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First off WELCOME to our OBSESSION!!!!

What a FIND!!!

AWESOME TANK AND STAND!!!!

I have been dealing with aquariums for 25+ years both as a hobbies and working in a friends Fish Shop, and I learned A LOT form him ( shop owner)!!! SO I would 4 SURE tell you NOT TO MESS WITH THE SEAMS or SILICONE!!!

Once silicone is cured new silicone WILL NOT ADHERE to it!!! So IF you have a leaky seam you will have to reseal the entire tank! Meaning you have to remove ALL the silicone from the tank even what is between the panes of glass, and redo all of the seams at the same time so it will be leak free!!! Also this info comes from the owner of All Glass Aquariums, the main holding strength of the seams is what is between the panes of glass, and the silicone that is pressed into the corner is to reinforce the silicone between the panes! It took me seeing him redo a tank to understand it but it is TRUE!!! That tiny amount in the seam does the majority of the sealing! He said when they first started making tanks they used smaller amounts of silicone so it would "look" better, or so he thought! They got many complaints about the small amount of silicone on their seams and people didn't think they would last, so they did what the consumer wanted and used more silicone!

ON a tank the size of the one you have I wouldn't even attempt to reseal the tank myself, and I have ( for fun) resealed a few small tanks I bought from a LFS because they were leaking. They would replace them rather than take the time to reseal because their time was money! the first few I did was a big learning curve, because you have to get all of the seams done before the silicone sets up! So IF you do have a leak I would check with your LFS to see if they know anyone who reseals tanks!

Secondly, I also learned , the hard way, that the overflow boxes built into the aquarium serves a few purposes. First it removes the upper layer of water where most of the proteins and other waste tends to build up. Second, and this is one some people don't think of, it protects the piping and bulkheads from being hit by rocks, big fish, or whatever, and causing the bottom pane of the aquarium to crack and break!!! One of the LFS will often drill the bottom of a aquarium and just use bulkheads and PVC for the drains and returns with NO "Overflow" installed around the pipes, and I know of a few people who have had rock work knocked over into the pipes, either by fish or when they were stacking the rocks, and the tank bottom broke out of the aquarium!!! Lastly it does hide the bright white pipes most use for drain and returns! Alot of people have used Krylon Fusion paint to coat pvc, and it does work, but it will usually chip or flake off when cleaning it. At least that is what I have read hear and other forums. I am still going to try it for myself to try to hide my spray bar in the 40B I am working on!

Oceanic tanks are some of the best aquariums out there, at least for lasting what seams to be forever, so I would just try to clean the seams as good as I can without scraping into the silicone! Once the tank fills and Ya get plants and livestock in it the small bit of algae won't be very noticeable anyway!

The "hood" is pretty short for hiding lights and stuff, but that is the way Oceanic built them for some time. I think they are building taller hoods now that flip up from the front so it is easier to feed and work on the tank. Since you are painting the stand I would just build a hood that you like and paint, or finish, it like you did the stand! If it was going to be stained it would be hard to match the base without striping the stand and finishing it and the hood at one time! I bought a 110g X-tall Oceanic tank about 10 years ago and tried to finish the hood like the stand, and I would up striping the stand and hood and refinishing them both to get a good match! It was 48"lx18"wx30"t, and while it was a AWESOME TANK, I couldn't reach the bottom to plant plants without getting most of my upper body wet! And just having my 3rd back surgery, I figured I better sell it before I fell off the tank when trying to plant and having a 4th surgery!!!

I would do a search of the journals for wet/dry filters or sumps to read up on how everyone has used their sumps for planted tanks to keep from off gassing the Co2 out of the water too! There are a few detailed threads here about sumps that will tell you exactly what ya need to know. I too would reinforce the floor if you are on a pier and beam foundation!!! Our house is a pier and beam, and my 55g is pushing its limits, and it is on a outer wall too! If Ya walk close to the tank you can see the surface start waving!!! So I am going to send my 18yo Son under the house to block it up, so with the 210g I would for sure check on it!

Other than that HAVE FUN WITH IT!!!! Also READ, READ, READ, all you can here, and you should do just fine! And feel free to holler at us if ya got questions, as that is how I learned and started out with the planted tank obsession I have developed!!! So get Your wallet out, and have a blast!!!

Sorry for the long post too!
Drew
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Old 09-20-2012, 01:41 AM   #7
canlax
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Thanks everyone, some good suggestions. I have been reading the forum like mad - I think I hit every tank journal that is 180g or larger. I really like Tankzen's tank for inspiration.

Here is what I have for under floor support from the basement. Do you see any reason for me to do any remedial work for extra support?

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Old 09-20-2012, 02:45 AM   #8
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A fellow 210g! I actually moved mine into our moving truck today. Wasn't easy, had to carry it about 100ft and then lift it into the truck. This would have been fine with four people, but it was just me and my dad. Hauling around 200lb each is no small task. I bought it in California, where I am now, but now our family is moving to Ohio, so we get to carry it across the US.

I am planning on doing a high tech Dutch tank with mine. I hope I can get some inspiration from you! I can find many journals of people with 210g's that are planted. I found a few reefs, but that's it.

Good Luck! These tanks are BEAST.


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Old 09-20-2012, 04:54 AM   #9
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if your able to turn the tank 90* and lay it across multiple joists your better off, What size are the joists? 2X10? 2X8? Being that close to the foundation wall your probably ok. If you have any concerns you can get a structural engineer out to do an inspection for a small consultation fee. Last time I designed a home with a sizable aquarium called out to be installed the engineer went nuts and spec'd out a 3" pipe column under every corner of the tank, and a thickened slab under that. To be honest, the tank was a 500g behemoth and it was int he middle of the structure.
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Old 09-20-2012, 09:54 AM   #10
Bettatail
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is this an good option?
angelfish as centerpiece
Discus tank, the choice of plants is limited due to high temp



Last edited by Bettatail; 09-20-2012 at 10:02 AM.. Reason: add info
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Old 09-20-2012, 02:24 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxxerBoyDrew View Post
First off WELCOME to our OBSESSION!!!!

What a FIND!!!

AWESOME TANK AND STAND!!!!

I have been dealing with aquariums for 25+ years both as a hobbies and working in a friends Fish Shop, and I learned A LOT form him ( shop owner)!!! SO I would 4 SURE tell you NOT TO MESS WITH THE SEAMS or SILICONE!!!
The tank is a beauty but I would disagree entirely about not touching the seams. Redoing silicone on a tank is fairly simple even for a DIY newbie like my younger self. I did a 100 liter tank as my first silicone attempt (inner seams only) and it was still perfect when I upgraded the tank 2 years on. Patch jobs (eg. fixing one leaky seam) are less than ideal as silicone doesn't bond as well to itself as it does to glass but I know people who have patches last a good 10 years so it can be done. As with any bond, be it soldering, gluing or siliconing, the real key is to prep the surfaces really thoroughly before you start. Its not a fast process by any means and its one of those 'more haste = less speed' kind of things. Anyway not saying that you definitely should/shouldn't do it, just that its possible.

PS. Boxxers mate and his boss are looking at it from a shops perspective. Believe me if you repair anything for a customer or stick your neck out for them in any way, you are asking for trouble. I've been blamed for everything from child's teethmarks appearing on an item (eeew and impossible in workshop full of chemicals, fire, heavy machinery and absolutely no small children) to an item coming back years later for a totally different repair. Selling that customer a new item is always infinitely easier, not to mention more profitable. I may be *slightly* jaded.
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Old 09-20-2012, 03:31 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ony View Post
PS. Boxxers mate and his boss are looking at it from a shops perspective. Believe me if you repair anything for a customer or stick your neck out for them in any way, you are asking for trouble.
I thought the customer was always right????

I might give it a shot, deliberating...
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Old 09-20-2012, 03:36 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noahma View Post
if your able to turn the tank 90* and lay it across multiple joists your better off, What size are the joists? 2X10? 2X8? Being that close to the foundation wall your probably ok. If you have any concerns you can get a structural engineer out to do an inspection for a small consultation fee. Last time I designed a home with a sizable aquarium called out to be installed the engineer went nuts and spec'd out a 3" pipe column under every corner of the tank, and a thickened slab under that. To be honest, the tank was a 500g behemoth and it was int he middle of the structure.
Joists are engineered 2x10. I would have been very pleased if the members ran perpendicular to the tank but unfortunately they do not and wall space doesn't allow for the tank to be turned 90 degrees.

I am thinking of either running a girder beneath the joists at the centre of the tank. The other option is to pull the tank out from the wall a little so the weight is distributed across 2 joists.
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Old 09-20-2012, 04:20 PM   #14
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My 75g is on a similar type of joist layout. I ended up putting up some 2x10's flat from the basement wall across 5-6 joists to try to distribute the weight. I found that the back is stable but the front, when walking towards the tank, would lean.
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Old 09-20-2012, 05:28 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canlax View Post
Joists are engineered 2x10. I would have been very pleased if the members ran perpendicular to the tank but unfortunately they do not and wall space doesn't allow for the tank to be turned 90 degrees.

I am thinking of either running a girder beneath the joists at the centre of the tank. The other option is to pull the tank out from the wall a little so the weight is distributed across 2 joists.
You could cat to the other joust by running 2x10 between them like this. Make real tite an nail them even shape 5 of them you should be fine. move it a little and pick up both joust and put in three cat. Do this before you load the joust you'll get a tite stiff floor.
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