What are the best fertilizers for low light moss' and java ferns?
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:36 PM   #1
jakevwapp84
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What are the best fertilizers for low light moss' and java ferns?


wondering what to get?
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:41 PM   #2
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I dont know if there is a best, cheapest would be dry ferts, depending on the tank size store bought liquid fertilizers might not be a bad option either but still way more expensive in the long run.
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:42 PM   #3
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i have a 10 and a 20 gallon tank
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:45 PM   #4
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fish food.
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:56 PM   #5
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the only thing i have in the tank are juvinile CRS would this still help
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Old 08-02-2012, 11:28 PM   #6
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I'd definitely go with a full set of dry ferts. They last forever. Honestly though, for low tech you may not need them at all. Every couple months in my shrimp tank Ill get pinholes in the leaves and have to dose some potassium, but that's about it. My 29 however has upper low light/medium light and requires all te ferts. Really just depends on the setup and plants, if you watch the plants and learn the deficiency signs it's easy to know what to dose and when. But ya either way, can't beat the price and longevity of dry ferts. Can always make your own liquid mix to dose if you want too. It'll save you a lot over going with pre-bottled liquid ferts like seachem and such that could mold before you even use half of it.
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Old 08-02-2012, 11:30 PM   #7
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Rootmedic OneStep is great for low light tanks.

http://rootmedic.net/store/onestep-f...zer/#cid=13208
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Old 08-03-2012, 12:44 PM   #8
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I have to second the OneStep from Justin. Especially in a low-tech tank like that.

Though, with those plants, you likely won't need much fertilizing at all. And you'll need to keep things really simple with CRS, as you aren't yet experienced with them.
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Old 08-03-2012, 02:32 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jakevwapp84 View Post
wondering what to get?
Hello jake...

I keep Java fern and Singapore moss in my tanks and the best, long term fert for low light plants in general, is a heavily stocked tank. The fish, fed a balanced diet will feed your plants most of the nutrients required. You can dose a little of the "trace elements" weekly when you do your water changes. I like organic, hydroponic liquids, but there are other forms like dry, granules or tablets. The liquids seem to work the best for my plants.

Large, frequent water changes are a good source of nitrates, phosphates and sulfates. All necessary nutrients for healthy plants.

Just an opinion, though. Don't want to say mine is the only way.

Above everything else, have fun with the hobby!

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Old 08-03-2012, 05:12 PM   #10
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Dosing fertilizers like that would potentially be a disaster with sensitive shrimp like CRS. Their requirements aren't standard to livebearers and other basic fish.

Large, frequent water changes are not a good idea with CRS. And it's not a good idea to rely on your water to serve as a good source of nitrates, phosphates and such unless you know exactly what's in your water you're using to do water changes. Using RO water, for instance, means there's nothing in it unless you add it.

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Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post
I keep Java fern and Singapore moss in my tanks and the best, long term fert for low light plants in general, is a heavily stocked tank. The fish, fed a balanced diet will feed your plants most of the nutrients required. You can dose a little of the "trace elements" weekly when you do your water changes. I like organic, hydroponic liquids, but there are other forms like dry, granules or tablets. The liquids seem to work the best for my plants.

Large, frequent water changes are a good source of nitrates, phosphates and sulfates. All necessary nutrients for healthy plants.
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Old 08-03-2012, 06:41 PM   #11
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Default The Best Fertilizers

Hello some...

Thanks for the comment, but was simply answering the original post about the best ferts for Java fern and mosses.

Actually, I'd would disagree with tap water not being a good source of nitrates, phosphates and sulfates, though. Nitrates aren't supposed to exceed 10 ppm in municipal water supplies, so there is a reasonable amount in our water. As for phosphates, our ground water is filtered through numerous rock formations where it dissolves phosphates and sulfate is in our rain water. If we have decent lighting, keep to the less demanding plants and add a little of the micro nutrients, our plants will grow well.

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Old 08-03-2012, 06:50 PM   #12
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Default Not again (living is suppose to be learning)

Here's a perfect example of why changing water like socks and underwear isn't always the answer. (hoping everyone does that at least once a day)
Continues to be the wrong answer posted again and again unless you know the source parameters. geez~!
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=185923
Also if my tap water was great source of nitrates, phosphates and sulfates I'd be buying a filter system asap! If that was out of the tap on a central system I'd be complaining.

some what shocked at those that continue to post without reading threads.
somewhatshocked really liked your post with good advice to the OP.

I lived through water hell after moving (my critters weren't as lucky).
Water isn't the same everywhere and can even be different from wells 100' apart drilled to a different depth.
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Last edited by wkndracer; 08-03-2012 at 07:24 PM.. Reason: started to delete it and changed my little mind
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:32 PM   #13
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Default The Best Ferts

Hello w...

Sounds like a horrible experience! But, experience is always the best teacher. Just gave an opinion, no more, no less. Like I've read numerous times on this forum. "No two tanks are the same". So, absolutely, get more than one opinion. Use your own judgement and proceed.

Thanks for the input.

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Old 08-03-2012, 08:12 PM   #14
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Like I mentioned, "it's not a good idea to rely on your water to serve as a good source of nitrates, phosphates and such unless you know exactly what's in your water you're using to do water changes. Using RO water, for instance, means there's nothing in it unless you add it."

With tap water, it differs from city to city, state to state, region to region. My tap water in Arizona has 80ish TDS and no nitrates. Tap water in Kentucky has 400+ TDS, Nitrates that are out of this world, often has ammonia, et al. Unless one tests their water to know what's present, it's tough to merely rely on water to fertilize any plant.

Fortunately, the OP won't need much in the realm of fertilizer at all.
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