Inert Nutrient Rich Substrate
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:10 AM   #1
Smitty06
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Inert Nutrient Rich Substrate


I am looking for a substrate that is inert, or mostly inert, soft, and nutrient rich. This will be for a dp tank with mm, java fern, moss of some sort, and some fast growing stems. Also if you have any recommendations for a faster growing stem in low to moderste light please leave your suggestion. ( other than rotala rotundifolia )

Sorry title should say Soft Nutrient Rich Substrate and then have the next sentence say and will not alter ph.

Last edited by Smitty06; 07-31-2012 at 06:37 AM.. Reason: Cheese tastes GOOD
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:34 AM   #2
Aquinoobie16
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pretty sure inert means no nutritional quality (could be wrong dont quote me) I have actually had pretty good success with plain old petco sand and some root tabs with java fern and moss... a few good stems could be anacharis or some hygro ive also seen cabomba grow pretty quick along with some Ludwigia... it all depends on what look your going for in your tank... Good Luck
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:43 AM   #3
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Yeah the title is an oxymoron lol. I am half asleep writing this as well as the original post. My Bad
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:54 AM   #4
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i feel ya on that one xD but just get some root tabs in some regular petco sand and you could do good just remember to dose something like flourish or some other fert so your plants have something to nom on and you should be good
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:29 AM   #5
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Get aqua soil and be done with it. Or akadama or stratum. Also for the stem try hygro polysperma sunset
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Old 08-01-2012, 12:42 AM   #6
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"Does not alter the pH" suggests a sand, not one of the ADA products.
Nutrient rich can mean a sand with fertilizer tablets, but I would really prefer a high CEC substrate. When you add fertilizer to a high CEC substrate it holds the fertilizers in a way that make them available to the plants over time. I am not sure there is a high CEC substrate that does not also sequester the carbonates, though. Of course, lock up the carbonates and that allows the pH to drop.

I have mixed Turface with Coral Sand and been able to keep Rift Lake Cichlids without a problem. The Turface is high CEC, and removes KH. But the coral sand adds the KH right back, so this blend would not really be inert, but at equilibrium.
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Old 08-01-2012, 04:22 AM   #7
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I think I will just get Aquasoil to make it easy. It is cheap at my lfs ( $38.99 compared to $59.99+ shipping ) for the powder type 9L. Also not to clutter up the forums, how much aquasoil to make a nice depth in an ADA 60P?
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Old 08-01-2012, 02:57 PM   #8
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Measure the bottom of the tank (length x width)
Assume 2" minimum depth, though you might slope it. More if you want big mountains.

Most substrates are packaged in liters or quarts.
ADA products are in liters, so do your measurements in cm (2" deep = 5 cm) and divide by 1000 to get liters.
For quarts, there are 231 cubic inches in a gallon, so just under 60 cubic inches in a quart.
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:37 PM   #9
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+1 this. This should be in a sticky somewhere, for sure, if it's not already.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
ADA products are in liters, so do your measurements in cm (2" deep = 5 cm) and divide by 1000 to get liters.
For quarts, there are 231 cubic inches in a gallon, so just under 60 cubic inches in a quart.
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