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Old 04-23-2012, 07:52 AM   #16
leemonk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
You don't really need to feed shrimp if there are only a couple.
The plecos don't require a ton of food either.
In my opinion livestock aren't really the solution to algae issues.
Some liquid ferts may help, especially if your anubias are forming holes (nutrient relocation)
I may have missed it above, but what sort of algae do you have? Green, brown, stringy, slimy?
At the risk of sounding like the 'hard done by bloke', I have/had them all.

I recently carried out a massive clean out due to what appeared to be very solid green slime that was sticking everything together.... it stuck grass's to the wall of the tank, it stuck my moss together for form shelves which gathered the waste in the tank.

I also have white cotton wool looking stuff that seemed to grow from the driftwood, though that certainly seems to have eased off now.

Brown was very prevalent on the mosses. They moss would start out nice and green on the new growth and within days it would be all brown, this also happened to the stem plants.

I have some pics from another forum that I will try and post.... though the recent green slime is not in there.

Lee
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Old 04-23-2012, 07:53 AM   #17
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There... they came out better than I thought they would.

I'll try and get a picture of the recent green slime. It was mostly on the plants, but where i have cleaned it out there are random small spots on the substrate now.

*EDIT*

The substrate can be seen below too!
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Old 04-23-2012, 04:25 PM   #18
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With the amount of light you have you absolutely have to use CO2 if you don't want a BBA garden, which you now have. That tank and light fixture were designed for a reef tank, which takes a lot more light than a planted tank. Along with the CO2 you absolutely have to dose the water - nitrogen (nitrates), potassium, and phosporous (phosphates), plus trace elements, including iron, and a little magnesium unless your water naturally contains adequate magnesium.

"Green slime" algae is blue green "algae", actually a bacteria. It usually shows up when you have too much light and when you are short of nitrogen (nitrates).

One thing you can try is putting a layer of fiberglass window screen, sold as insect screen over the lights to reduce the intensity. Each layer will drop the intensity by about 40%. One or two layers will do it.

As bad as your BBA is now I think you should replace all of the plants, clean everything else in the tank very well to eliminate all of the living BBA, and start over with lower light and good fertilizing.
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Old 04-23-2012, 09:27 PM   #19
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I don't see anywhere if the T5s are HO or NO, which makes a pretty big difference. I'd guess HO by the BBA, but no guarantee. If that is the case I agree with Hoppy that CO2 or less light is in order.
Continuing to be in agreement (he does know his stuff), the slime is BGA and tends to go away on its own once you have some nitrates in the water (always does for me). It also looks like you have some GSA on your anubias (low CO2 or low phosphates) as well as plants that are starved of something, and trying to move nutrients from their old leaves.
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Old 04-23-2012, 10:37 PM   #20
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Is the 'screening the light' a better soloution than just reducing the time the lights are on?

The tank sits in a relatively shaded room and is also in the darkest corner, so it only really gets light from the tank and nothing else.

I really do not want to be dosing or CO2'ing my tank.

Was my original idea a poor one? Plants in baskets with tabs? Or, given I dont want to dose or CO2, should I just restart and stick with anubias and mosses?

If I do that, I assume a non-descript (sand etc) would be sufficient for substrate?

Regards
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Old 04-23-2012, 10:52 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leemonk View Post
Is the 'screening the light' a better soloution than just reducing the time the lights are on?

The tank sits in a relatively shaded room and is also in the darkest corner, so it only really gets light from the tank and nothing else.

I really do not want to be dosing or CO2'ing my tank.

Was my original idea a poor one? Plants in baskets with tabs? Or, given I dont want to dose or CO2, should I just restart and stick with anubias and mosses?

If I do that, I assume a non-descript (sand etc) would be sufficient for substrate?

Regards
No, less hours of light isn't the same as less intensity of light. Too much of either and you have a problem, but you can't just trade one for the other.
Light drives the need for nutrients, less light = less need for nutrients. Get the light low enough and the fish excrement may be sufficient. Root tabs would be sufficient with a low lights setup, and would only need replacing every 6-12 months.
We do need to know if your T5 is a high output T5 or a normal output T5, this is really important.
I've had great luck for years with crypts, easy stems (rotundifolia, l. repens) in low light tanks with no ferts and few fish. The plants looked a lot nicer once I started adding root tabs once/year, but they weren't required.
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Old 04-23-2012, 11:01 PM   #22
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We do need to know if your T5 is a high output T5 or a normal output T5, this is really important.
Hi,

How can i find this out?


ps... thank you all for your support and patience
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Old 04-23-2012, 11:06 PM   #23
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The bulbs are probably marked with a wattage on the bulb somewhere, or a model number. Tell us what's written on it and we'll tell you what you have. Also, I find T5 NO bulbs to be somewhat dim, whereas T5 HO bulbs are rather blinding.
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Old 04-24-2012, 02:39 AM   #24
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Can we get a full pic of the tank, to see how densely planted it is?

From my experience of dealing with algae naturally... more plants = less algae, then add nerites, amano shrimp, otocinclus to balance out the remaining growth, there will always be some, key is finding balance. A little Flourish Excel will also help with control every now and then.

Less light = less algae growth but also less plant growth. I would really just plant more heavily and add some floaters to suck up excess nutrients.

3 years is a little long for the bulb, I'd find some new ones, I recently replaced my Aerogarden (little hydroponic system) bulbs that were about 2 years old, and plant growth really took off.
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Old 04-24-2012, 03:43 AM   #25
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Since you almost certainly have far too much light, using old bulbs is an advantage because they can deteriorate enough to drop the intensity by as much as 50%. I'm almost certain that the standard light for that tank is T5HO.
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Old 04-24-2012, 08:19 AM   #26
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I'll get some up to date pictures shortly..... battery is now charging.

I've managed to remove one of the lights (first time) and there is no writing on it anywhere.

If it helps, the two pins at either end are only 2 or 3mm apart. I'll keep the bulb out for now incase there is something I am missing.

Regards
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Old 04-24-2012, 02:24 PM   #27
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:34 AM   #28
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Yikes! If that was my tank I would do what Hoppy suggested, redo it with a better planted tank substrate and lots of fast growing plants and floating plants. Please don't give up hope we are here to help you.
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Old 04-25-2012, 04:05 AM   #29
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You have gotten alot of good advice from these members. Im sure you can go low tech if you wish, or with the set up you have you just need co2 and a good substrate for the high tech. I run High tech set ups because I like to see my efforts grow quickly. Being indecisive about your setup will cost you like it has in the past.

I like to surf around this forum seeing what others are doing differently from me, which helps me alot. Learning from what others have learned WILL save you hundreds of dollars in trail and error plus substrate costs and what ever you decide to buy and doesn't work out.

Marine saying:
One shot one kill
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Old 04-25-2012, 05:08 AM   #30
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Are you interested in getting guppies? I'm asking because that's how one of my tanks looked like before I put in a few guppies. Once I put them in they went to town on the algae. I have to admit I don't exactly know what type of algae I had but some of them looked like diatom and some are fuzzy/hairy looking and the guppies cleaned them up really good. Still some spots left but a lot cleaner looking than before. If you are interested in guppies it's worth a try. Just get a couple and see how it goes.
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