Anyone with biology knowledge: boiling or baking to kill Mycobacteria/Fish TB? - Page 2
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Old 02-14-2012, 03:24 PM   #16
TexasCichlid
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Obviously you are pretty worried about it. Fish TB is not a joke. Why not have some peace of mind and just get a new setup? Bleach the tank, and start completely over. Your biggest culprits will be the filter materials, hardscape and substrate. With the amount of work and worry you have put into this, your opportunity costs have probably already exceeded actual costs of purchasing the replacement bits you need.
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Old 02-14-2012, 03:51 PM   #17
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I just know that I work with bacteria daily and the only sure-fire way we destroy it is in an autoclave.
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Old 02-14-2012, 08:26 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by DogFish View Post
This seems to contradict that http://textbookofbacteriology.net/control_3.html

I can understand the consistency & effectiveness of the autoclave. I don't understand without documented study of how to destroy Mycobacterium marinum, how can we say that Boiling at 220 or heat in a oven at 200 is absolutely not going to work?
Although an autoclave would seem to be the best method, I'm afraid I don't have access to one.

Take a look at the "Dry Heat" section of this article:
Wikipedia - Sterilization (microbiology)

Yes, I know it's Wikipedia, but after doing a LOT of other searching online, the other sources I could find seemed to be consistent with what it said: A "standard" dry heat application is 160C/320F for 2 hours (starting after the item is thoroughly heated), with some sources recommending closer to 6 hours. It also seems that increasing the temp by 10C roughly halves the required time.

To be safe, I'm thinking of more like 400-450 F for a couple hours. For the substrate, I'd only do 25% at a time to make sure it's thoroughly heated in a reasonable amount of time.

I've also seen references to an "intermittent boiling" process that's designed to kill spores by boiling for 30 minute increments spaced 24 hours apart for several days. The idea is that the end of each heat cycle encourages the bacteria to come out of their spore-stage, so the next heat cycle kills them. I'm thinking of using this method for a couple of irreplaceable decorations that I'm not sure would be safe at the temperatures used in the dry heat method above.
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Old 02-14-2012, 08:27 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Chlorophile View Post
And let me tell you those training videos are awful.
I had to get my pesticide handler/worker training a few weeks ago and then I decided never to handle pesticides because they made it clear that you're going to get sick and get cancer and get nerve damage =[
I've seen enough training videos to know how painful they are, and these sound much worse than the ones I've been subjected to!
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Old 02-14-2012, 08:39 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by TexasCichlid View Post
Obviously you are pretty worried about it. Fish TB is not a joke. Why not have some peace of mind and just get a new setup? Bleach the tank, and start completely over. Your biggest culprits will be the filter materials, hardscape and substrate. With the amount of work and worry you have put into this, your opportunity costs have probably already exceeded actual costs of purchasing the replacement bits you need.
Unfortunately, a completely new setup isn't an option due to cost reasons.

By the time you factor in the time/labor to do a full tear-down of the system and purchasing/preparing new components (ex: rinsing Flourite), the actual time difference between a "cleaned" setup and a "new" setup isn't that substantial. The only real way it'd make a difference was to replace the tank itself (rather than the components), but since it's a 52gal flat-back hex and not a standard 55gal, even that doesn't make sense economically.

Even then, I don't make enough for my "lost time" opportunity cost to make the difference (contrary to what most believe, flying isn't very lucrative: airline pilots start out around 20k and it doesn't go up quickly from there)
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Old 02-14-2012, 08:43 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by mallorieGgator View Post
I just know that I work with bacteria daily and the only sure-fire way we destroy it is in an autoclave.
I understand that's what you use and it's probably the "best" method, but do you have any reason to believe that a "dry heat" process liked the one I linked to above wouldn't also be effective? Yes, it'd require more heat and take significantly longer (which is why an autoclave is the preferred method), but I couldn't find anything that would imply that it wouldn't work altogether.
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