Asking for Substrate choices for a 8 foot by 2 foot tank
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > Specific Aspects of a Planted Tank > Substrate


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-10-2012, 09:53 AM   #1
Aswain
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 8
Default

Asking for Substrate choices for a 8 foot by 2 foot tank


I have a 8' by 2' tank looking for substrate. I have 2 four foot, 3 bulb t-5 lights. I am looking for substrate choices for growing plants. I have discus so I want something that will not alter ph too much. I am using flourish black in my 46 gallon tank and like it.
Aswain is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-10-2012, 12:26 PM   #2
ChadRamsey
Wannabe Guru
 
ChadRamsey's Avatar
 
PTrader: (56/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Canton, Ga
Posts: 1,392
Default

i would go with MTS and cap it with either PFS or flourite.
ChadRamsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2012, 06:06 PM   #3
phantom85
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: australia
Posts: 77
Default

i used 2 bags of richgro aquatic potting mix in my 46g 4 foot tank. you get it from bunnings or maybe homemart, it cost me $6 a 20lbs bag and works great, capped it with black quartz sand. just rince it heaps. it will spike the ammonia when its first in the tank but that settles about 2 weeks after. aoll my plants love it. i put a few root tabs under it to get it started and within 3 weeks of starting the new tank my swords were throwing up new plantlets for me
phantom85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2012, 07:18 PM   #4
DogFish
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (33/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Gone
Posts: 5,988
Default

How heavy do you want to plat the tank?

Some plants & lots of swimming room or Wall to Wall plants?

You can plant in clay pots. If you have a bit of aquascape skill you can hide the pots in rock work or with drift wood. oh at orchid pots they are wide and not as tall, look at window box clay pots low rectangle pots. Place taller in the back, smaller mid ground an the leaves from the mid ground pots will help hid the pots in the back.

Last edited by DogFish; 01-10-2012 at 11:38 PM..
DogFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2012, 07:43 PM   #5
Hilde
Planted Tank Guru
 
Hilde's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mableton, GA
Posts: 4,472
Default

I have found that reptile coconut bark on the bottom prevents soil from getting compacted.

Depending on the plants organic top soil topped with river sand would work. I get a big bag of river sand at a landscapers for $3. Crypts need rich sand. For them can use root tabs.
Hilde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2012, 11:28 PM   #6
Aswain
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 8
Default

I am gonna look into mts and how easy it is to setup.
What's the difference between the richgrow and mts?
What about using just sachem flourish or onyx sand?
If I use these do I still have to add fertilizer?
Aswain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2012, 11:37 PM   #7
Aswain
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 8
Default

I think I would like to have it medium planted. Enough so fish can hide, yet open enough I can see them swim.
Aswain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2012, 11:44 PM   #8
DogFish
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (33/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Gone
Posts: 5,988
Default

The benefit of planting in pots is only having to worry about the roots - in the pot. They can be move at will and even remove fort serious cleaning or rescaping.

A full dirted floor is easier to aquascape (no pots to hide).

if you go full tank plantable substrate unless you make your own this can get expensive fast in a tank that large.

I'd advise you read the threads about MTS with a sand cap and the variations on it.
DogFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2012, 12:03 AM   #9
Aswain
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 8
Default

I have Read about mts and it seems like some work. Is the Richgrow is same as mts or better? Is using fluorite the same as mts? Cause I like t flourite since all I have to do is pour bag straight into aquarium. Don't mind the price of seachem flourite if it dose the same as mts.

Sorry for so many question. Just with a tank this size I wanna buy substrate once. The cost is the main factor. No need to pay twice with a tank this size.
Aswain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2012, 12:09 AM   #10
DogFish
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (33/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Gone
Posts: 5,988
Default

"Just with a tank this size I wanna buy substrate once." a very wise thought.

There nothing wrong with pour & plant substrates but eventually you'll need to do some sort of root feeding.

Keep a planted tank is work no matter how you go about it. With MTS the work is more up front, with Pour & Plant like fluorite the substrate work is on going. Both will grow plants.
DogFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2012, 01:36 AM   #11
Aswain
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 8
Default

Thanks for the info. I am gonna have to think about this now. I couldn't wait and put fish in befor substrate. Now I am regreting this.
Aswain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 07:45 AM   #12
Robert H
Planted Tank Guru
 
Robert H's Avatar
 
PTrader: (31/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Salem Oregon
Posts: 2,328
Default

If you are keeping Discus, one of the most sensitive fish on the planet to nitrate and ammonia, and water quality as a whole, I don't think you want to mess around with any kind of soil for the first time. You want things to be as stable as possible.

Any type of clay gravel would be inert. Flourite and Eco complete do not alter the pH. Turface is a little alkaline. If price doesn't matter, I prefer Eco complete to Flourite for several reasons
__________________
Robert Paul Hudson
RAOK Club #1
Kindness like love is unconditional
Robert H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 09:43 AM   #13
phantom85
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: australia
Posts: 77
Default

rickgro is very coarse and looks like white clay broken up. i call the company and it is actually fossilized sea sponges to it has a huge cfc rating, there is no heavy metals or other contaminates in it. its just really REALLY dusty
phantom85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2012, 01:57 PM   #14
Kathyy
Planted Tank Guru
 
Kathyy's Avatar
 
PTrader: (33/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Newbury Park, CA
Posts: 3,096
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert H View Post
If you are keeping Discus, one of the most sensitive fish on the planet to nitrate and ammonia, and water quality as a whole, I don't think you want to mess around with any kind of soil for the first time. You want things to be as stable as possible.

Any type of clay gravel would be inert. Flourite and Eco complete do not alter the pH. Turface is a little alkaline. If price doesn't matter, I prefer Eco complete to Flourite for several reasons
+1
Go with one of these. I just pulled everything out of my 8' tank and while it was a very long day the fish were back in the tank by the end of it. Just have the substrate washed out the day before and after placing it and doing the hard scape and possibly some of the planting fill the tank part way, dump that water and do your final fill with the hose over bubblewrap or plastic or newspaper to diffuse the flow.

My substrate started out Schultz's Aquatic Soil and has been mixed with regular aquarium gravel since. The SAS is 11 years old now with no breaking down I can see. SAS is one of the Turface type products, mine came from Walmart. OilDri is another you might look into. These products are light weight and can be difficult to plant in but one big advantage is you need fewer pounds of the stuff. Been too long but I do remember I had equal weights of gravel and SAS going into the 150 gallon tank and SAS was 3" thick and gravel was 1/2" thick!

If you have gravel and it isn't pea sized then you are fine. Just get some plant tabs and stick under the rosette type plants and it is fine. If you do have pea sized gravel then mixing that with substrate in the same color family looks great and more natural than uniform sized substrate. In my opinion of course!

A really great look could be to use white sand in a shallow layer and have Anubias, Java fern, Bolbitis and mosses growing on branchy wood. All only need low to moderate light and don't need a rich substrate!
__________________
Kathyy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2012, 09:26 AM   #15
Aswain
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 8
Default

With discus is fluorite onyx sand ok for discus? Package say will not alter water, but I have read it dose. Any thoughs of using this with discus?
Aswain is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012