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Old 08-17-2015, 07:09 AM   #1
WaterLife
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High Demanding Plants in their NATURAL Environment/Habitat


So we all know about the plants that demand high lighting, plenty of ferts in water column and/or substrate and maybe with the addition of CO2, and they do look really great in the high-tech aquariums, but can anyone show pictures or link a video showing what they look like/how well they grow in their natural habitats.

I haven't really seen any pics of plants in the wild that look as lush and vibrant green as in aquarium pics. I would think they wouldn't have conditions as well and so would be less vibrant (although obviously immersed growth is very colorful and healthy looking) and maybe even have more tattered looking leaves. But then again I probably am wrong, which is why I am just curious to see pictures and learn more of how they environment provides all the high demands for the plants.
I assume minerals in rocks, dirted (at least under the rocks and all), sunlight is obviously great, and not too sure how sufficient CO2 is provided, maybe all the decomposing leaves from trees and other organic compounds?

So really, looking for any youtube vids or pics of plants (specifically higher demanding plants) someone took on trips and also interested in learning how the environment provides the demands.
Anything the environment provides for the plants that can't or is very difficult to replicate in the average aquarium?
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Old 08-18-2015, 12:38 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterLife View Post
So we all know about the plants that demand high lighting, plenty of ferts in water column and/or substrate and maybe with the addition of CO2, and they do look really great in the high-tech aquariums, but can anyone show pictures or link a video showing what they look like/how well they grow in their natural habitats.

I haven't really seen any pics of plants in the wild that look as lush and vibrant green as in aquarium pics. I would think they wouldn't have conditions as well and so would be less vibrant (although obviously immersed growth is very colorful and healthy looking) and maybe even have more tattered looking leaves. But then again I probably am wrong, which is why I am just curious to see pictures and learn more of how they environment provides all the high demands for the plants.
I assume minerals in rocks, dirted (at least under the rocks and all), sunlight is obviously great, and not too sure how sufficient CO2 is provided, maybe all the decomposing leaves from trees and other organic compounds?

So really, looking for any youtube vids or pics of plants (specifically higher demanding plants) someone took on trips and also interested in learning how the environment provides the demands.
Anything the environment provides for the plants that can't or is very difficult to replicate in the average aquarium?
See this thread. http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...906&highlight=

CO2 often comes from the break down of certain rocks and upwells from springs continuously.
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Old 08-18-2015, 01:28 PM   #3
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Try some of these
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDI...T25jwzucibiGUw
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:12 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Steve001 View Post
See this thread. http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...906&highlight=

CO2 often comes from the break down of certain rocks and upwells from springs continuously.
Thank you both very much, exactly what I was looking for!
And what do you know, it's by Ivan Mikolji. I've come across his stuff several times while researching and he always has great stuff.

Took a brief skim through the video, and already got a bunch of good info on how the whole ecosystem works.

And just when I am in the process of downsizing on the amount of tanks I have and just putting together a main display, fancy aquascape tank, now after seeing the video I want to do a natural style tank, most likely a region-specific species tank (of plants, livestock and all). Ahh, now I will have to get one in the works. Haha

Thanks again.

Steve, any idea if those rocks that end up creating co2 can be used practically in aquariums (for a natural tank)? Happen to know the types of rocks? I assume it would take a ton of rock to get a good amount of naturally produce co2, so I don't expect to have high co2 levels, just maybe enough to get some decent brighter colors and possibly more reds in the plants without the need to dose any outside sources for co2.


Oh and by the way, I've been seeing BBA (black beard/brush algae), being asked about a lot lately. Since you guys seem to know more about the more natural side to fish things, do you happen to know what/if anything eats BBA in the wild/nature? Or whether it's some kind of chemical from rock minerals or a type of fungus that consumes or what, there must be something that takes out BBA, just no one seems to have THEE answer haha. Just thought I'd ask.
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:40 PM   #5
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Another answer is... they don't, really. Most of the plants we use are found in the marginal region of wetlands/rivers, meaning on the streambed or growing partially out of the water. And algae is always present in the natural environment, there aren't really any places where you won't find it. Look up Pantanal, it's one of the regions where aquatic plants flourish.
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:43 PM   #6
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I see tonina!
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Old 08-18-2015, 03:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterLife View Post
Thank you both very much, exactly what I was looking for!
And what do you know, it's by Ivan Mikolji. I've come across his stuff several times while researching and he always has great stuff.

Took a brief skim through the video, and already got a bunch of good info on how the whole ecosystem works.

And just when I am in the process of downsizing on the amount of tanks I have and just putting together a main display, fancy aquascape tank, now after seeing the video I want to do a natural style tank, most likely a region-specific species tank (of plants, livestock and all). Ahh, now I will have to get one in the works. Haha

Thanks again.

Steve, any idea if those rocks that end up creating co2 can be used practically in aquariums (for a natural tank)? Happen to know the types of rocks? I assume it would take a ton of rock to get a good amount of naturally produce co2, so I don't expect to have high co2 levels, just maybe enough to get some decent brighter colors and possibly more reds in the plants without the need to dose any outside sources for co2.


Oh and by the way, I've been seeing BBA (black beard/brush algae), being asked about a lot lately. Since you guys seem to know more about the more natural side to fish things, do you happen to know what/if anything eats BBA in the wild/nature? Or whether it's some kind of chemical from rock minerals or a type of fungus that consumes or what, there must be something that takes out BBA, just no one seems to have THEE answer haha. Just thought I'd ask.
I don't think it practical to do it the same way nature does. It is practical to create co2 using limestone and vinegar or citric acid.
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:05 AM   #8
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this is very nice

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBtyTkdqfGc#t=358
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