Another form of Plasma Lighting Home Induction Light Bulbs....
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Old 05-05-2011, 01:07 AM   #1
Steve001
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Another form of Plasma Lighting Home Induction Light Bulbs....


... an interesting option over T5HO and other types of lighting.


A little while ago today I posted this http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/li...g-options.html evilc66 replied,
Quote:
If you want the closest thing to sunlight, then prepare to reach deep in your pockets for plasma
I had no doubt they were right when I looked at the pricing https://inda-gro.com/store. But upon further search I found out there are induction light bulbs that can be used in place of incandescent or cfl's in the home and are not pricey at all; for instance * http://stores.bestingreensolutions.c...fBallasted.pdf.
They seem to be a very good option because of their rated life time of 50,000-100,000[?] hours. Their very compact size. Very low heat output [ a 400 watt induction lamp only has a surface temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit ]. They fit standard light bulb sockets. Are self ballasted and they come in a variety of color temps the one of interest to us is 6500K.


Photo of a planted tank https://inda-gro.com/gallery/album/10

Interesting vid demo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTcdJ6tNXrQ

*this site seems to have the best price so far

Last edited by Steve001; 05-05-2011 at 02:25 PM..
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Old 05-05-2011, 01:12 AM   #2
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I would need to see PAR figures and I would think that the curious shape of the lamp itself in your photo might not lend itself well to even the most efficient reflector. It's real hard to say.
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:15 PM   #3
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Those are induction fluorescents, not plasma. Plasma is a whole different ball game. It's more similar to metal halide, but with the efficiency and lifetime of LED. It's also about double the cost of induction fluorescents.

The only reason that any of these lamps is getting the lifetime stated is because the electrodes are gone from the lamp package. They are the part of the lamp that is sacrificial, and limits the life of the lamp (other than phosphor degradation, at least in fluorescents).

80F bulb surface temperatures is a load of crap BTW. It's a lot lower than your typical fluorescent at the same wattage, but it isn't that cool. I got a chance to play with a 70W Fulham induction lamp a few months ago. After a few hours of running, it was very uncomfortable to put your hand on for more than a second or two. Wouldn't burn you, but certainly isn't fun to hold. They hold some promise if the costs can come down some, but you never have to worry about bulb replacement.
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Old 05-05-2011, 08:15 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilc66 View Post
Those are induction fluorescents, not plasma. Plasma is a whole different ball game. It's more similar to metal halide, but with the efficiency and lifetime of LED. It's also about double the cost of induction fluorescents.
But it is a plasma. Since the process to make light is from free electrons rejoining mercury ions [liberating UV light] it is considered a plasma. Common fluorescent tubes are plasmas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by evilc66 View Post
The only reason that any of these lamps is getting the lifetime stated is because the electrodes are gone from the lamp package. They are the part of the lamp that is sacrificial, and limits the life of the lamp (other than phosphor degradation, at least in fluorescents).
Does that matter. Rated life is what's important as it keeps cost of bulb replacement way down compared to other more conventional bulbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilc66 View Post
80F bulb surface temperatures is a load of crap BTW. It's a lot lower than your typical fluorescent at the same wattage, but it isn't that cool. I got a chance to play with a 70W Fulham induction lamp a few months ago. After a few hours of running, it was very uncomfortable to put your hand on for more than a second or two. Wouldn't burn you, but certainly isn't fun to hold. They hold some promise if the costs can come down some, but you never have to worry about bulb replacement.
That stated working bulb temp was from another site. The article was merely discussing this lighting technology, not promoting it as a sales pitch. Perhaps the article did overstate. I've not been able to find out yet how hot they actually get in lower wattage range. But since induction light bulbs are available for in home use to replace existing fluorescent and incandescent bulbs they can't operate with very high bulb temps.

Costs, it seems to me that *initial costs are on equal footing with the types of light sources being used to light planted tanks. An argument could even be made that these bulbs could be even more cost effective than LED's.

On the Inda-Gro.com site there are pics in the Gallery of this type of light being used on a planted tank along with horticulture pics. Although purely qualitative the color quality looks very good.
if you know where to find a spectrum of this light in the 5500-6500K range and PAR values would you let us know. I've found nothing yet.

*Price list
http://stores.bestingreensolutions.c...Categories.bok
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Old 05-05-2011, 09:02 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve001 View Post
But it is a plasma. Since the process to make light is from free electrons rejoining mercury ions [liberating UV light] it is considered a plasma. Common fluorescent tubes are plasmas.

Ok, I'll agree with you there. For the most part, when talking about accepted types of lighting in the general and aquarium lighting worlds, this is a fluorescent lamp. Light emitting plasma lamps are a different breed by accepted standards, not the physics.

Quote:
Does that matter. Rated life is what's important as it keeps cost of bulb replacement way down compared to other more conventional bulbs

I was pointing it out to show why these lamps have such an increase in life over standard fluorescent lamps.
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Old 05-05-2011, 10:16 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilc66 View Post
Ok, I'll agree with you there. For the most part, when talking about accepted types of lighting in the general and aquarium lighting worlds, this is a fluorescent lamp. Light emitting plasma lamps are a different breed by accepted standards, not the physics.


I was pointing it out to show why these lamps have such an increase in life over standard fluorescent lamps.
Ok......
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Old 05-06-2011, 04:49 AM   #7
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Any reason to suspect these are much more efficient than CFL bulbs of similar K value?
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Old 05-06-2011, 04:51 AM   #8
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$53 for a bulb that should last for many years is honestly not a bad deal as long as the light quality doesn't degrade/shift enough matter.

http://stores.bestingreensolutions.c...elf/Detail.bok
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Old 05-06-2011, 02:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redfishsc View Post
$53 for a bulb that should last for many years is honestly not a bad deal as long as the light quality doesn't degrade/shift enough matter.

http://stores.bestingreensolutions.c...elf/Detail.bok
Take a look at the Inda-Gro.com link above. Watch the vid and look at the Gallery. I think I read on some site this is a dimmable technology, but don't hold me to that.
From what I can see people are using this type of light to grow pot and for general horticulture. YouTube has vids.
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Old 05-06-2011, 03:23 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redfishsc View Post
Any reason to suspect these are much more efficient than CFL bulbs of similar K value?
Any efficiency gain made by the new bulb setup is negated by the high frequency power supplies. I'm sure the drivers will improve, but as it stands right now, they aren't any more efficient. What is advantageous is that you can pack more watts in a smaller area. The shape of the bulb is still a killer of efficiency though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve001 View Post
Take a look at the Inda-Gro.com link above. Watch the vid and look at the Gallery. I think I read on some site this is a dimmable technology, but don't hold me to that.
From what I can see people are using this type of light to grow pot and for general horticulture. YouTube has vids.
Yes, these can be dimmed, if equiped to do so. Fulham has 0-10v dimming as an option for most of their setups.
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