DK's m..a..d.. d..o..-i..n..g..s........ - Page 2
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > Specific Aspects of a Planted Tank > Shrimp & Other Invertebrates


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-27-2011, 06:15 AM   #16
HypnoticAquatic
Wannabe Guru
 
HypnoticAquatic's Avatar
 
PTrader: (18/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: arvada, co
Posts: 1,289
Default

diggin on the blues for sure, thx for the updates
HypnoticAquatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-27-2011, 06:19 AM   #17
problemman
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (43/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: ravenna ohio
Posts: 3,411
Default

where did you acquire the orange sakura shrimp from? was this a cross between a yellow and red sakura?
__________________
"Twisted Wood" 75 gallon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardinal Tetra View Post
I sell plants but not green thumbs, sorry.
problemman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 12:12 PM   #18
aman74
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 331
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenisgood View Post
(BTW - These are projects under development and none are for sale at this time.)

I've had a slew of requests to post updates on my projects lately, so here goes. I'll have to do it in several posts.

First off, the big kahuna. Took me a year to engineer, and the past year has been in beta testing. I run my tanks off our well water, which happens to emerge from the ground like CO2 infused RO water with 10 ppm nitrates (farm fertilizer runoff). So all the water to feed my tanks has to be "made" to specs.

I designed this, what I call DK's water factory, to make me some water. It creates three streams of water which I can blend to make most any water for a given tank. So every tank gets custom water, twice daily, automated from this beast.

It wasn't without moaning and gnashing of the teeth, and I've had to learn incrementally what works and what doesn't and work laboriously slowly and methodically to formulate the global conditions, and then tweak each tank for optimization to their specie.

Each global test can only change parameters about 5% and takes a few weeks to take effect to observe the specie, so it's a long process. This is due to the fact that too drastic a change could crash one or more tanks.

On top of working out the global parameters for the Water Factory, I also fired up more tanks last year to accomodate more breeding projects. So it's been a busy year, just trying to get it all together and keep from accidentally killing stuff, which, alas, I didn't altogether avoid. I had some pretty good setbacks that tested my skills and nerve.
Awesome work on the setup side and your working with the animals.

I have a few questions if you don't mind.

That first rack on the right, is that 24" deep and about 72" or so long? I've seen a similar rack at Costco. Are those 15's set end to end? I was going to go with 10's as they are cheaper and I have limited space. However they are over 20" long and the next size down in racks is 18" unless I special order. So I thought I may go with 15's for the stability and because I'd have to go the next size up in racks anyhow.

About the wire mesh on those racks. If I recall correctly, some of the wires are up higher than others right? That's no issue if they are very close, but I think the ones I saw only had a few that were higher and I was worried about a way to even this out. It looks like you used foam? However, with rimmed tanks the foam pushes up on the bottom plane. They are meant to rest on the rim or something hard that doesn't form to the bottom. I was thinking they may even be safe right on top of the wires as long as the distance between wires is close. Not positive on that, but if it's only a 2" spread there should be any pressure points of consequence as the load is spreak by the trim.

If you did use foam, how do you find it holds up to getting water and other dirt on it? That was one of my concerns is how it will look after awhile.

I'm looking to do similar quality work as yourself with the shrimp, just on a much smaller scale. I could use some assistance, if you have the time or inclination, you can pm me. It's rare to find people trying to do every aspect to the highest standard. I'm the very same way, I just don't have all the knowledge yet.

Thanks,

Anthony
aman74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 01:37 PM   #19
DKShrimporium
Shrimp Listener
 
DKShrimporium's Avatar
 
PTrader: (197/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: PA/MD/DE tristate area
Posts: 1,289
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EKLiu View Post
That first picture makes my head hurt.
If you think of it as tinker toys, legos, and mud pies for adults, then it's not so intimidating. It was a WHOLE lotta fun to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by justin182 View Post
Are those just regular substrate, or are they some special ones that buffer the water? Beside leaf litter, what leaves are those in the last pic?
I believe in ecosystems - as my background is as a biologist. I do not believe in proprietary, artificial, designer, or chemically-induced and try to avoid them whenever possible. Regular cheap substrate. Backyard leaves - oak, maple, poplar, elm, beech

Quote:
Originally Posted by problemman View Post
where did you acquire the orange sakura shrimp from? was this a cross between a yellow and red sakura?
A shrimpy friend, and I was lucky to get a few. They are a color gene mutation of reds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aman74 View Post
I have a few questions if you don't mind.

That first rack on the right, is that 24" deep and about 72" or so long? I've seen a similar rack at Costco. Are those 15's set end to end? I was going to go with 10's as they are cheaper and I have limited space. However they are over 20" long and the next size down in racks is 18" unless I special order. So I thought I may go with 15's for the stability and because I'd have to go the next size up in racks anyhow.

About the wire mesh on those racks. If I recall correctly, some of the wires are up higher than others right? That's no issue if they are very close, but I think the ones I saw only had a few that were higher and I was worried about a way to even this out. It looks like you used foam? However, with rimmed tanks the foam pushes up on the bottom plane. They are meant to rest on the rim or something hard that doesn't form to the bottom. I was thinking they may even be safe right on top of the wires as long as the distance between wires is close. Not positive on that, but if it's only a 2" spread there should be any pressure points of consequence as the load is spreak by the trim.

If you did use foam, how do you find it holds up to getting water and other dirt on it? That was one of my concerns is how it will look after awhile.

I'm looking to do similar quality work as yourself with the shrimp, just on a much smaller scale. I could use some assistance, if you have the time or inclination, you can pm me. It's rare to find people trying to do every aspect to the highest standard. I'm the very same way, I just don't have all the knowledge yet.

Thanks,

Anthony
The FIRST place, and really only place (aside from breeding livestock) I spend top bucks is on my shelving infrastructure. The most expensive thing I have is my shelving. If your shelving units fail, you lose EVERYTHING. You are mixing heavy weight, water, electricity, and lots of other pricey stuff, and if the shelves fail, you lose it all, and in a dangerous and damaging way. All the rest of my stuff is BORG off the shelf parts, modest tanks, heaters, and filters - nothing high end. To me, the real beauty lies in a gorgeous, healthy animal and perfect ecosystem, not the gizmos surrounding them - that is just noise to me, and fashion. My first generation of tanks were plastic drawers from the dollar store. I still have one in use, as a matter of fact, because it is producing so well still I hate to disrupt the population in it. It is currently cantilevered off the end of one of my shelving units because I don't have anywhere else to put it right now!

I use industrial, double-rivet boltless shelving with a steel beam center support, welded 1/4 inch epoxy coated grids, all rated at 1500 lbs per shelf. I put closed-cell foam board on top of the grids to distribute the weight. It's precisely BECAUSE the tank rims will sink into the foam a tiny bit that makes this so safe - all the weight load is then evenly distributed with no pressure points. I would never put tanks on a rigid wire grid with extreme pressure points resulting. Closed cell foam (BORG) is waterproof but will dent, tear, etc. if abused. It lasts just fine if you are reasonably careful.

Since I like non-proprietary, I use 24x48 units, then I can use 48 inch shop lights overhead. They have the most widely available and cheapest T8 bulbs, and easiest to buy. I use 15 gallon tanks because they use the same glass thickness as 20s. The 10s are way too weak and flimsy in the glass for my liking.

I do use a couple of custom products: $8 mirrorized aluminum reflectors for the shop lights, and $10 custom twinwall polycarbonate greenhouse panels for lids that insulate but allow 90% light transmission through and are heat and impact resistant. Both contribute to energy efficiency, so pay for themselves.

-DK

Last edited by DKShrimporium; 10-27-2012 at 01:51 PM..
DKShrimporium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 01:56 PM   #20
aman74
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 331
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenisgood View Post



I use industrial, double-rivet boltless shelving with a steel beam center support, welded 1/4 inch epoxy coated grids, all rated at 1500 lbs per shelf. I put closed-cell foam board on top of the grids to distribute the weight. It's precisely BECAUSE the tank rims will sink into the foam a tiny bit that makes this so safe - all the weight load is then evenly distributed with no pressure points. I would never put tanks on a rigid wire grid with extreme pressure points resulting. Closed cell foam (BORG) is waterproof but will dent, tear, etc. if abused. It lasts just fine if you are reasonably careful.

Since I like non-proprietary, I use 24x48 units, then I can use 48 inch shop lights overhead. They have the most widely available and cheapest T8 bulbs, and easiest to buy. I use 15 gallon tanks because they use the same glass thickness as 20s. The 10s are way too weak and flimsy in the glass for my liking.

I do use a couple of custom products: $8 mirrorized aluminum reflectors for the shop lights, and $10 custom twinwall polycarbonate greenhouse panels for lids that insulate but allow 90% light transmission through and are heat and impact resistant. Both contribute to energy efficiency, so pay for themselves.

-DK
What's BORG?

It's my understanding that with a rimmed tank on a foam board you are creating an upward pressure point on the bottom pain as it's designed to be floating.

I don't think pressure points would be an issue on wire as long as the wire is close the weight is distributed across the rim. I could be wrong on this though and would probably still go with plywood or foam if going rimless.

So 10 gallon tanks glass is too thin for their size? Thickness only needs to go up as the size goes up. Do they fail more frequently?

Any details on the brand and source of the racks, light reflectors, and especially those lids, etc... is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Anthony
aman74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 02:28 PM   #21
DKShrimporium
Shrimp Listener
 
DKShrimporium's Avatar
 
PTrader: (197/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: PA/MD/DE tristate area
Posts: 1,289
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aman74 View Post
What's BORG?

It's my understanding that with a rimmed tank on a foam board you are creating an upward pressure point on the bottom pain as it's designed to be floating.

I don't think pressure points would be an issue on wire as long as the wire is close the weight is distributed across the rim. I could be wrong on this though and would probably still go with plywood or foam if going rimless.

So 10 gallon tanks glass is too thin for their size? Thickness only needs to go up as the size goes up. Do they fail more frequently?

Any details on the brand and source of the racks, light reflectors, and especially those lids, etc... is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Anthony
BORG = Big Orange Retail Giant = Home Depot

This is mis-information. With closed cell foam, the PSI rating is surprisingly high. They use 1/8 inch sheets of this stuff to rest sill plates for entire houses on top, to distribute and "float" a load. A tank, even a large one, will sink maybe 1/32-1/16 inch - the foam never approximates touching the under plate of the tank. Putting a tank directly on a wire grid is not ideal. It may not become a problem with a small tank, but I personally would never do it, especially with a large tank. I work with glass (drill, cut, grind) and respect how it will do sudden things due to pressure points and the resulting fractures that can happen.

The racks are extra heavy duty boltless shelving from globalindustrial. The reflectors are made by a local Amish guy near me dcooperworks dot net - just checked his website and the reflectors are now 10 bucks. The polycarb panels I have custom fabricated by Casey Kilgore at Ridout Plastics - eplastics dot com but I buy a 4x8 sheet of twinwall at a time and have the whole sheet cut down. You can't buy just a few panels cost effectively.

-DK
DKShrimporium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 05:21 PM   #22
snausage
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (29/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Jersey Shore
Posts: 1,167
Default

That DIY plastic drawer tank is so cool!

I totally agree with you that expensive gear isn't essential for breeding shrimp. I've recently switched over to ugfs because I get so annoyed by how the foam covering the intakes of my hobs clogged so quickly. That's why I'm surprised you're such a proponent of hobs considering it's more expensive to run a zillion of them and ugfs seem to prevent any planaria outbreaks and extend the life of the soil.

Do you have lots of plants in your crs tanks? My first tank was originally densely planted, but I wound up ripping almost everything out because it was so hard to keep track of berried females and babies and it also made removing uneaten food a real chore.
snausage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 08:03 PM   #23
justin182
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (56/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 586
Default

Everything about your system and shrimps is
justin182 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 10:05 PM   #24
liz3
Algae Grower
 
liz3's Avatar
 
PTrader: (34/100%)
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Atlanta GA
Posts: 144
Send a message via AIM to liz3
Default

DK, YOU ROCK! It is exciting to see your set up and the 1 order of Hino n-e's says it all when you look at them. Though, i now feel like a complete dunce for ordering an Azoo substrate . Oh well, it works, it is pretty but $$$. At least it is leaf litter in essence. or so i hope and think.
__________________
"Fish recognize a bad leader." - Conan O'Brien
liz3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 10:18 PM   #25
Joe.1
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (8/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Sacramento,CA
Posts: 311
Default

I am so looking forward to getting some of these shrimps. Great setup.
Joe.1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 10:46 PM   #26
aman74
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 331
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenisgood View Post
BORG = Big Orange Retail Giant = Home Depot

This is mis-information. With closed cell foam, the PSI rating is surprisingly high. They use 1/8 inch sheets of this stuff to rest sill plates for entire houses on top, to distribute and "float" a load. A tank, even a large one, will sink maybe 1/32-1/16 inch - the foam never approximates touching the under plate of the tank. Putting a tank directly on a wire grid is not ideal. It may not become a problem with a small tank, but I personally would never do it, especially with a large tank. I work with glass (drill, cut, grind) and respect how it will do sudden things due to pressure points and the resulting fractures that can happen.

The racks are extra heavy duty boltless shelving from globalindustrial. The reflectors are made by a local Amish guy near me dcooperworks dot net - just checked his website and the reflectors are now 10 bucks. The polycarb panels I have custom fabricated by Casey Kilgore at Ridout Plastics - eplastics dot com but I buy a 4x8 sheet of twinwall at a time and have the whole sheet cut down. You can't buy just a few panels cost effectively.

-DK
Thanks much for the specifics. Do you have any pics of those lids? I'm wondering how you did them, handles or sliding, etc...

Do you feel you would go RO/DI if it weren't for your water supply? I ask because my water isn't bad, but I'd need fancy substrate to lower Gh/Kh/Ph for some species and if I could save on substrat the RO/DI system would pay for itself.

Also, even though my water is ok in general, I don't trust it fully. A lot of cities with aging systems blast the system to keep things in check at unknown times. I've also, on rare ocassion, had my water come out smelling. Not sure if this is bacterial or what, but it's kinda scary and surprising in a metropolitan area.

As you know, as your investment in stock goes up, so does the concern.

Do you sell mosly on here in the SNS or are you on Aquabid as well? Just wondering where to look for your stock.
aman74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 10:46 PM   #27
Eden Marel
Planted Tank Guru
 
Eden Marel's Avatar
 
PTrader: (38/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Longmont, CO
Posts: 3,379
Default

I'm green with envy.
__________________
Eden Marel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 10:46 PM   #28
Clare12345
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Clare12345's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Montclair, NJ
Posts: 494
Default

More pics!
Clare12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 11:40 PM   #29
speedie408
ShrimpKeeprExtraordinaire
 
speedie408's Avatar
 
PTrader: (389/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Central Cali
Posts: 8,299
Default

Great job DK!! I really like the shrimps and setups.
speedie408 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2011, 11:50 PM   #30
DKShrimporium
Shrimp Listener
 
DKShrimporium's Avatar
 
PTrader: (197/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: PA/MD/DE tristate area
Posts: 1,289
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snausage View Post
Do you have lots of plants in your crs tanks? My first tank was originally densely planted, but I wound up ripping almost everything out because it was so hard to keep track of berried females and babies and it also made removing uneaten food a real chore.
I keep different mosses. I don't really keep track of berried females; it's like trying to watch the pot boil...

Quote:
Originally Posted by aman74 View Post
Thanks much for the specifics. Do you have any pics of those lids? I'm wondering how you did them, handles or sliding, etc...

Do you feel you would go RO/DI if it weren't for your water supply? I ask because my water isn't bad, but I'd need fancy substrate to lower Gh/Kh/Ph for some species and if I could save on substrat the RO/DI system would pay for itself.

Also, even though my water is ok in general, I don't trust it fully. A lot of cities with aging systems blast the system to keep things in check at unknown times. I've also, on rare ocassion, had my water come out smelling. Not sure if this is bacterial or what, but it's kinda scary and surprising in a metropolitan area.

As you know, as your investment in stock goes up, so does the concern.

Do you sell mosly on here in the SNS or are you on Aquabid as well? Just wondering where to look for your stock.
Depends on my water, and its reliability. I would never use designer substrate, though. It fatigues over time and when you finally realize it's fatigued, you are stuck needing to re-do an entire tank at the mercy of its timing. With an RO unit, you change your filters, but you can control that, and it doesn't distrupt your entire tank to do, to make appropriate water. Plus, you don't have to shell over too much money, AGAIN, for designer substrate.

Mostly I hang around TPT, but I do occasionally put stuff on AB (ID = photosyner), to keep my feedback refreshed. The exotic stuff will first go up on AB, to help me recoup some of the horrifying up front expenses I've had to spend to get into some of these new varieties. I do not feel comfortable asking sky high prices for stuff, so when it's new I let the market decide on AB. When I have production up enough, I move over here and try to spread stuff into the hobby affordably.

Pic of a lid, below. I used a hole saw to drill a hole, then ordered buna-n grommets and plugs from Grainger.

Picture of some Black Tigers snackin' down in their "cave," while the boyfriends dance in the foreground... somebody just molted and is gonna be packing eggs, soon... whoo hoo! I just took these pics...

Picture of a coo-el Blue Tiger T-Rex baby.

Last edited by DKShrimporium; 10-05-2012 at 03:26 PM..
DKShrimporium is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012