How Can I Dump CO2 Before Mixing with Water at Night?
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Old 10-26-2014, 09:11 PM   #1
Bruce6000
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How Can I Dump CO2 Before Mixing with Water at Night?


Any creative ways of turning off CO2 at night without pulling the airstone and maintaining pressure in the line?

I've got a DIY CO2 gallon/reactor sitting under my cabinet. No way of measuring CO2 in the water column. I think there's too much in there. When I do a fresh batch I get consistent bubbles like you see in the video for about 4-5 days before they begin to taper off.

There's a bit of an algae outbreak which I'm told will go away when I have consistent CO2, but for now, any ideas would help. I know I can dump the CO2 by cutting the line using a valve, but I'll lose the pressure.

Thanks!

http://youtu.be/QEsL9Xh11_A
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:36 AM   #2
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Is there any livestock in the tank? If not, then there's no worries about having too much. The only concern for having too much is killing or stressing livestock. Otherwise there's no such thing as too much.

The airstone is the diffuser, right? I doubt you have as much co2 actually dissolved in the water as you might think. Those big bubbles that go straight to the surface and pop are basically wasted.

As for consistency, you might try using a bit less yeast in your recipe. Less yeast usually equals less co2 production, but it will remain steady for a longer period of time.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:56 AM   #3
themountain
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Easy to fix...get a Co2 topper
http://dennerle.com/en/products/aqua...ors/co2-topper
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Old 10-27-2014, 01:28 AM   #4
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I agree with burr740, your probably not getting anywhere near the CO2 you want. There are a few ways to measure CO2 in the water column, 1. is a drop checker, 2. is checking the PH/KH and doing some math or using this website http://fishfriend.com/aquarium_co2_calculator.html neither will give you 100% accuracy but it will give you an idea of the CO2 in the water column. If it were me, I'd be looking for ways to diffuse more CO2 in the water as opposed to less, its most likely the source of your algae.
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Old 10-27-2014, 03:27 AM   #5
Bruce6000
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burr740- Just got a couple of shrimp in there. Want to get everything dialed in before I begin adding more livestock. But yea, the airstone is the diffuser. Thanks for the yeast tip, I'll try out half a teaspoon see how that goes.

greaser84, I'm working on it. Eventually I'll get a pressurized CO2 system, for now I'm just trying to make my DIY as efficient as possible. Thanks for sharing the info, great stuff!

BTW- never heard of a CO2 topper. Looks interesting but couldn't find that much info on them with my first search. I'll have to reasearch that one further.

Thanks guys!
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Old 10-27-2014, 07:12 AM   #6
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I would recommend this :http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paffrathsche_Rinne
The Paffrathsche channel(also: Paffrathsche shell , Paffrathschale )
is a simple device to dissolve (CO2) carbon dioxide in water. Its origin and it most common use is in the aquarium, where it is used for supplying biologically produced ( by yeast fermentation ) CO2. It was named after its developer Kurt Paffrath , an aquarium author. CO2 acts as an important plant nutrient and also affects the pH of the aquarium water .
Principle of operation
An inverted cup , which is mounted, for example by means of suction cups below the water level in the aquarium. In the upwardly facing bottom are often one or two passages assembled , one of the CO2 supply is used and the possible second , provided with a short hose and a shut-off valve is used as a so-called waste gas vent to present in the shell of air , which is lighter than CO2, to let escape upwards .
Operation
The supply of CO2 from a fermentation vessel accumulates beneath the inverted bowl . At the contact surface of the resulting CO2 bubble to the aquarium water, the gas diffuses into the liquid. Due to different sizes selected shells there will be differently sized contact or diffusion areas . In this way you can adjust the amount of CO2 to be dissolved on the aquarium size.

Size calculation : Base size : 100 liters
Carbonate contact surfacein
KH up to cm
10 ---> 30
11 ---> 50
12 ---> 70
13 ---> 90
14 ---> 110
15 ---> 130
16 ---> 150
Advantages over conventional CO2 supply devices
Known adding devices (or called reactors) , such as pinball, diffusers or external reactors ( the initiation of CO2 in the water of the filter circuit ) continuously solve the supplied gas in the water. This addition is controlled by controlling the CO2 flow rate.This is in the known pressure bottle systems not a problem because the amount of gas can be set constant by means of a valve .
In biologically produced CO2 , however, the gas generation does not proceed uniformly , it is dependent on the temperature and also on the length of the fermentation process , there is also during production of the CO2 flow, the danger of explosion of the fermentation tank , which is normally only a plastic bottle or canister and is not suitable for high pressure. However, since the contact area of the CO2 to the water in the channel is always the same and there is a more or less uniform addition of the gas is ensured to the aquarium water. If more gas is supplied , as the shell can hold , it escapes just as a bubble on the lower edge of the shell .
Disadvantages compared to conventional CO2 supply devices
Due to the required contact area a Paffrathsche channel inside the aquarium is difficult to hide . The attachment can problematic due to the buoyancy of the gas-filled shell .

For me it worked always well

cheers Andy
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Old 10-27-2014, 03:23 PM   #7
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Hey Andy, that sounds really interesting. That page was in german, which is not my native tongue. I'll have google translate if possible. I still don't get how the gas inside the chamber dissolves into the water. Germans always come up with great stuff XD. Thanks!
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Old 10-27-2014, 08:09 PM   #8
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With DIY co2 most people just let it run 24/7.

An airstone makes a lousy diffuser, you might want to look into something more dedicated to co2 so you can get better diffusion (smaller bubbles that dissolve easier). Glass Nano diffusers on eBay can be had for under $10, easily.
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Old 10-27-2014, 09:47 PM   #9
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+1 air stone makes a lousy diffuser. You wouldn't need to dump co2 at night with an air stone as a diffuser.


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Old 10-27-2014, 10:10 PM   #10
Bruce6000
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I was actually in the process of getting a nano diffuser until I heard someone mention that you need a pressurized system to make them work.
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Old 10-27-2014, 10:28 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce6000 View Post
I was actually in the process of getting a nano diffuser until I heard someone mention that you need a pressurized system to make them work.
DIY can generate enough pressure to push through some of them, but a lot of brands wont work. The cheap ones would probably be your best bet to try. Forget about anything that says it requires 30 psi to work.

A 1" piece of chopstick would do a lot better than the airstone. Then position it under the filter output so the current can further distribute the bubbles.
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Old 10-27-2014, 10:29 PM   #12
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I'd give it a try. I'm pretty sure I've read reports of people with DIY co2 using regular nano co2 diffusers. They're not as temperamental about pressure as the inline diffusers are, like the Atomic ones. It just takes some time to build up enough pressure in the system. And of course, not an expensive mistake if it doesn't work out. You could also build or buy a small reactor, if you're using a canister filter that you can run it through.
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Old 10-27-2014, 11:20 PM   #13
Bruce6000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burr740 View Post
A 1" piece of chopstick would do a lot better than the airstone. Then position it under the filter output so the current can further distribute the bubbles.
That's interesting. Love some Chinese food so I got a few of those laying around XD. I think I'll give that a try.

Hey Kman, an inline reactor just mixes CO2 into the outflow of the filter correct? Thought about doing that too. So many options. Honestly I want a pressurized system but I don't want to go cheap on that, so I'm stuck with trying out some different DIYs for now.

I really apprecaite all the advice you guys rock
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Old 10-28-2014, 12:33 AM   #14
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Re reactor: Yes.

As to pressurized co2, it's not as expensive as you might think. $88 for the
Aquatek paintball reg Aquatek paintball reg
, and $20 for a
paintball tank paintball tank
(both on Amazon) and you're in business. (use the hose you already have for now, and buy a proper nano diffuser)
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Old 10-28-2014, 01:15 AM   #15
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I did DIY CO2 on a 10 gallon for a long time, I got a nano diffuser and a small 50 gph powerhead, I set the powerhead above the diffuser, and positioned it to catch the bubbles from the diffuser and chuck them across the tank. I plugged the powerhead into a timer and at night the powerhead would go off, the diffuser kept pumping CO2 but it wasn't enough to cause a problem. You can also do this with your airstone, the goal is to keep those bubbles in the tank as long as possible. You can get a powerhead for about 5 bucks on ebay, I also positioned the diffuser/powerhead close to the substrate so the bubbles would stay in the water longer. I still use this method on my 10 gallons but with a pressurized CO2 system.
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