Getting pretty close to giving up and going salt water..
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Old 09-27-2013, 04:32 AM   #1
Markahsf
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Getting pretty close to giving up and going salt water..


I don't get it. I don't even want to look at my tank anymore and to be honest, I feel like throwing a baseball at it. I probably would if I wasn't on the second floor of my house.

I'm blasting co2 and in one day, I get an algae outbreak. Everything was fine yesterday and since the tank is only a month old, I check up on it everyday. I don't know what I did wrong and like I said, I'm about to just give up with the whole planted tank thing and go salt water again.

29 Gallon tank, 8 hour photoperiod, pressurized co2, EI Ferts every other day, weekly 50% water change, dual T5HO mounted on the rim of the tank, lots of plants. I use a Rex Griggs reactor but in the picture below, there's bubbles because I'm blasting the co2 at around 10 bubbles per second.

How am I still getting algae? This is effing retarded. Diatoms? Hair algae? Yeah, I think I'm done with this tank. BS.

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Old 09-27-2013, 04:52 AM   #2
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Don't give up on it, it takes time to zero in on everything. Are you using a drop checker?

If so what is the color on it, and if you're not using a drop checker I'd say to pick one up.

Drop checkers are the easiest way to zero in on your co2, I primarily use a up-aqua drop checker, but for my 45 gallon long tank I have the up-aqua drop checker in one front corner and a bubble drop checker in the other front corner. This way I can see if my co2 is circulating throughout the tank.

Another thing I would recommend is a True Siamese Algae Eater, they love all kinds of algae especially hair algae. Unlike some pleco's which tend to grow out of eating algae as they mature, or chinese algae eaters which can be aggressive to other fish, a True Siamese Algae Eater is very effective at devouring algae, and even as they mature will still eat algae. Plus they're more laid back and tend not to pester other fish, or plants. Not to mention True Siamese Algae Eaters will eat flake food also when there's no algae present in the tank.

Diatoms are known for popping up in newly set up tanks, and go away after a while.
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Old 09-27-2013, 04:59 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxUnRaTeDxxRkOxx View Post
Don't give up on it, it takes time to zero in on everything. Are you using a drop checker?

If so what is the color on it, and if you're not using a drop checker I'd say to pick one up.

Drop checkers are the easiest way to zero in on your co2, I primarily use a up-aqua drop checker, but for my 45 gallon long tank I have the up-aqua drop checker in one front corner and a bubble drop checker in the other front corner. This way I can see if my co2 is circulating throughout the tank.

Another thing I would recommend is a True Siamese Algae Eater, they love all kinds of algae especially hair algae. Unlike some pleco's which tend to grow out of eating algae as they mature, or chinese algae eaters which can be aggressive to other fish, a True Siamese Algae Eater is very effective at devouring algae, and even as they mature will still eat algae. Plus they're more laid back and tend not to pester other fish, or plants. Not to mention True Siamese Algae Eaters will eat flake food also when there's no algae present in the tank.

Diatoms are known newly set up tanks, and go away after a while.
I have a drop checker and it's lime green but I'm about to blast even more co2. I have some amanos and ottos but tomorrow. I'm going to say eff the timer and I'm going to blast co2 for the next 24 hours with no lights. Pretty sure that'll help a bit, even if some fish are lost along the way.


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Old 09-27-2013, 05:08 AM   #4
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Finding a balance is not easy. If your dosing EI, doing your WC's, have pressurized C02 at stable levels and a good substrate. What's left is your lighting. Too much light seems to have always been my enemy. Raise it off the lid, have it shut off mid photo period for an hour and clean as much algae out of your tank as possible.

All dead or decaying leaves must go. Pull your driftwood out and clean it well. If your ready to give up you should try the "one two punch" method that is posted on this forum. It's a treatment with peroxide that will slow/kill the algae growth and let you get a grip on the tank.

How old is this tank?
What are your water params.
Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, KH, GH, PH, Temp??
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:09 AM   #5
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Overloading c02 does not fix the root of your problem. And killing your inhabitants in the process because of frustration is cruel.
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:18 AM   #6
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I would suggest reading through this, it'll explain how to deal with different kinds of algae.

http://www.guitarfish.org/algae
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:29 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiftymeatballs View Post
Finding a balance is not easy. If your dosing EI, doing your WC's, have pressurized C02 at stable levels and a good substrate. What's left is your lighting. Too much light seems to have always been my enemy. Raise it off the lid, have it shut off mid photo period for an hour and clean as much algae out of your tank as possible.

All dead or decaying leaves must go. Pull your driftwood out and clean it well. If your ready to give up you should try the "one two punch" method that is posted on this forum. It's a treatment with peroxide that will slow/kill the algae growth and let you get a grip on the tank.

How old is this tank?
What are your water params.
Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, KH, GH, PH, Temp??
Month old, no ammonia, no nitrites, 30ppm nitrates, KH at 5, GH at 8, ph is around 7.8 out of the tap but 6.4-6.6 when I'm running co2. I had no algae issues until today. The algae literally appeared overnight. I throughly check my tank for algae everyday.

The only difference with today was that there was a lot of decaying leaves floating. I just put a ton of new stem plants in and a lot of them are melting leaves while they acclimate.

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Old 09-27-2013, 06:03 AM   #8
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Have you considered a low-tech approach? I like you, had a lot of hardware and did lots of stuff and still the algae was destroying my love of the hobby. I keep increasing the CO2 and the fertilizers and things just kept getting worse. I was about to give up when I decided to try something radically different (Really what did I have to lose?). I turned off the CO2, I stopped the fertilizers and cut the hours on my lights. After a couple weeks and a couple 50% water changes later, things started turning around. The BBA and staghorn algae began to die away.

I upgraded my filter from a HOB (AC50), to canister filter (Fluval 206). I keep seeing improvements, but I still had some green algae on the tops of the plants.

I got a spray bar for the filter (more water circulation), and added seachem Purigen and PhosGuard. Also Try some cory cats, to



My tanks is pretty clear of algae, the water is magically clear (Purigen) and I've got a happy school of Glass Bloodfin Tetras (see above) going on. I never add fertilizer and have long since pulled the CO2 out of the tank.

Side note: Avoid Siamese and Chinese Algae eaters (they grow up to be world class jerks), go with a small school of Otto's. Ottos are great algae eaters and are charming little additions to any tank. Also try a small school or cory cats to help keep the bottom of your tank free of uneaten food.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:11 AM   #9
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If you are in the right spot on your CO2 then it's either your lights or the amount of ferts you are running. What are the lights on your tank? Also, how are your phosphate levels looking?
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:50 AM   #10
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I have similiar problem everytime I restart or start a new tank. My advice... keep your C02 at a reasonable level. Cut the ferts to once a week. Add to your plant mass if it fits your scape plans. Lastly I would do 5ml daily of Metricide. After that leave it be and let it grow in. I recently had to do the same with my 75 and my 46g after doing a total top to bottom rescape including new substrate. It's VERY frustrating to have nasty hair algae completely covering $200 of Tahitian Moon Sand. Just let it stabilize and you'll be happy with it. For now stick to the plan
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:01 AM   #11
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Thanks for the advice. Does the tank being only a month old have anything to do with it? I can't say this happened with my smaller high tech set ups but I guess I never payed this much attention to them. I'm going to cut the photo period by an hour and try to raise the lights a couple inches. They're dual T5HOs.

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Old 09-27-2013, 07:35 AM   #12
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What ferts are you using along with how much? Are they self mixed or is it a store bought mix?
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Old 09-27-2013, 08:18 AM   #13
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Diatoms are common in new tanks and they can last a few weeks to a few months. You have to find a right balance with lights, ferts and co2. Seeing that your hair algae is on the branches close to the surface which is only a few inches from the light if it's placed on the rim, I would say that's the problem.

The pictures you showed barely shows much alage. Consider yourself lucky because that is a very minor algae outbreak.
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Old 09-27-2013, 08:34 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aznartist34 View Post
Diatoms are common in new tanks and they can last a few weeks to a few months. You have to find a right balance with lights, ferts and co2. Seeing that your hair algae is on the branches close to the surface which is only a few inches from the light if it's placed on the rim, I would say that's the problem.

The pictures you showed barely shows much alage. Consider yourself lucky because that is a very minor algae outbreak.
That is a good point. Also, one big thing to keep in mind that algae is an issue for every type of tank. However, salt water algae is generally much more difficult to control compared to fresh water.
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Old 09-27-2013, 09:01 AM   #15
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Haha @OP
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