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Old 06-18-2010, 09:13 AM   #16
accordztech
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circulation also plays a big role in algae. Good circulation is a must. Usually if i have spots of algae I look at the circulation, I play with the flow and spot treat with h202 depending on the algae and then go from there.

I had true SAE and never got aggressive. They do their part controlling algae, and usually stay around my ottos.

i mainly use h202 for bba. Thats the main algae i get once every few months when I get lazy haha
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Old 06-18-2010, 01:34 PM   #17
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Have to say well done!

Never had Amanos, are they OK in soft(low PH water) that is what we have in NYC.
Are they OK to keep with large Angels?

Well, the rule for shrimp and fish is, if it can fit in their mouth, they'll eat it. That being said, in a heavily planted tank with plenty of deep foliage and hiding spots, if you put the Amanos in first, they might be ok. But truthfully, I would expect their number to dwindle over time.

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What about using antibiotics? I've heard this mentioned before but I'm not aware of the specifics.
Erythromycin is the antibiotic of which you speak. It's used to combact "Blue Green Algae" which isn't an algae at all, but a cyanobacteria. It's typically caused a combination of factors including low nitrate and low water circulation.
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Old 06-18-2010, 02:23 PM   #18
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Can you have success doing the Glut application (I use Excel) totally submerged? Like squirt on bad spots? Or do you really need to spray on open-air leaves?

Great thread, thanks, kudos!
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Old 06-18-2010, 02:30 PM   #19
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Can you have success doing the Glut application (I use Excel) totally submerged? Like squirt on bad spots? Or do you really need to spray on open-air leaves?

Great thread, thanks, kudos!
I know people that do it that way. I never have. I always squirt directly on it.
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Old 06-18-2010, 04:33 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by jmhart View Post
Finally, If you have any questions or comments regarding the above, feel free to let me know.
You missed a method. An Algae Refugium. I have a 10G tank under my 75G tank full of algae, and the light is on 24/7 to maximize algae growth. Why? Because if the algae grows well in my refugium it eats all the nutrients before algae can grow in your display tank where conditions are not as good (not as much light).

Stick a couple snails in the refugium to eat the algae and continue the cycle and it REALLY keeps your display tank from being overgrown. It does not stop the algae from growing but it stunts its growth by consuming the nutrients first.
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Old 06-18-2010, 04:58 PM   #21
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You missed a method. An Algae Refugium. I have a 10G tank under my 75G tank full of algae, and the light is on 24/7 to maximize algae growth. Why? Because if the algae grows well in my refugium it eats all the nutrients before algae can grow in your display tank where conditions are not as good (not as much light).

Stick a couple snails in the refugium to eat the algae and continue the cycle and it REALLY keeps your display tank from being overgrown. It does not stop the algae from growing but it stunts its growth by consuming the nutrients first.

I know this is a very popular method among reefers, but it doesn't directly apply to FW planted setups. Sure, there are the occasional ammonia spikes that need to be sucked up, but for the most part, algae in FW planted tanks is not caused by excess nutrients.


I put emphasis on that last bit, not just for you, but for everyone. I think that's the hardest concept for people to accept.
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Old 06-18-2010, 05:31 PM   #22
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Jmhart, I think you've done a fantastic job at creating this guide. There are always things that could be added, but conciseness is a virtue. I didn't see any critical flaws.
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Old 06-18-2010, 05:48 PM   #23
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Quote:
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I know this is a very popular method among reefers, but it doesn't directly apply to FW planted setups.
I have played with growing algae in a freshwater sump to control it in my tank, and was unsuccessful at it. But still am intrigued by the idea. After reading the thread "healthy plants = no algae WHY??", it seems more is known about what does not cause algae (ie. high N03), but ultimately not what causes it.
The fact that excess nutrients do not cause algae, does not disprove that growing algae to control it would work. Nor does it prove it.
Great Thread! Thanks for the info.
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Old 06-18-2010, 09:28 PM   #24
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If you use a scrubber aeration box, or a vertical substrate sheet, algae scrubbers work well, but it's much more efficient to use plants in the fuges than micro algae.

Plants like emergent water sprite, peace lilies, moss, etc work great

But it's not about export of nutrients for most planted tanks with CO2, it's much more about plant dominance and stability. We add nutrients, not really want to export, so the goals are very different for the diaplay and the fuge, this is also true for marine systems.

You can have a planted marine tank where you have to dose and add ferts.

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Old 06-18-2010, 09:35 PM   #25
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After reading the thread "healthy plants = no algae WHY??", it seems more is known about what does not cause algae (ie. high N03), but ultimately not what causes it.
It's funny that you should mention that, because we as a hobby focus so much on how NOT to grow algae, than when somebody needs to, often they can't figure out how.
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Old 06-18-2010, 09:37 PM   #26
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Jmhart, I think you've done a fantastic job at creating this guide. There are always things that could be added, but conciseness is a virtue. I didn't see any critical flaws.
Thanks for the compliment! I was inspired after reading someone's thread about an SAE wreaking havoc in their tank.
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Old 06-18-2010, 09:37 PM   #27
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This link to the article is one of the best in dealing with the over balance with light and CO2.

http://www.tropica.com/advising/tech...and-light.aspx

95% of algae control is growing plants and good management for your goal.
The big players there are mostly light and CO2.


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Old 06-26-2010, 04:32 AM   #28
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SAE: The true Siamese Algae Eater, C. Siamensis. When SAEs are young (6 months or less) they eat the hard stuff and work their way down, which is cool. They start out with string algae, BBA, and clado, and then start working on GSA and GDA once the other stuff disappears. SAEs are social fish and should be in groups no less than 3, but 5 is really a much better number. SAEs have SEVERAL large downsides. First off, they get big, really big, like 6+ inches...digest the last two sentences: they should be in groups of 5+ and grow to 6+ inches. In case you can't put it together, these fish need AT LEAST a 55g tank but really belong in a 75g+. On top of all that, after about 6 months, they stop eating algae, and instead turn to anything and everything else: shrimp, small fish, hairgrass, moss....anything and everything but algae. So now you've got a bunch of huge fish that don't eat algae, great. But wait, there's more! SAEs also become more and more territorial as they get older and they'll quickly turn on your other fish. In short, these are not the miracle fish you've been led to believe.

I think you have the SAE mistaken for the Flying Fox? I've kept a group of 5 true SAE's in my 75g for over two years now. I think they are maxed in size at about 4 1/2 - 5 inches. They do not eat my small fish or mosses. I can't comment on shrimp since i have never had any in my tank. They are only semi aggressive with each other and my Red Tail Shark bullies them all.

You did a great job with this article but in my personal experience i have never had a problem with the SAE's.
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Old 06-26-2010, 04:58 AM   #29
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Nice article and well written. Hopefully a few that are getting ready to kick the hobby over algae will find some relief here.
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Old 06-27-2010, 01:52 AM   #30
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Very nice write-up Jm. My tank was recently overrun by algae. I had the BBA all over my lace java fern, peacock moss, and glass. I tried the Excel overdose method I had read about and it did nothing. Finally I had to remove my plants and hit them with 3% H2O2 which seemed to work very well. Afterwards I dumped about 20oz of H2O2 into the tank and let it circulate for about 30 mins. Did a 60% water change and cranked the CO2 up till the drop checker was in the yellow (no fish in there at the moment).

Keeping my fingers crossed, but after two days, the algae seems to be dying off of the plants and the glass and substrate look clean. Going to invest in some Amano shrimp once I get ready to re-stock this tank.
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