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Old 05-11-2014, 07:18 AM   #241
redant
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i have a few hygrophila polysperma that didn't anchor well to the substrate and now are floating....will the plants survive like this, or do they need to be anchored to the substrate ??
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Old 05-11-2014, 12:26 PM   #242
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i have a few hygrophila polysperma that didn't anchor well to the substrate and now are floating....will the plants survive like this, or do they need to be anchored to the substrate ??
It will start to grow long roots up the stem i have a few sunset hygros like that now sorry i first gave the wrong info.

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Old 05-11-2014, 01:54 PM   #243
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Some members let stem plants float if they don't have an established root system. Then once the roots start shooting out, they plant it in substrate. So, to answer your question, yes they should survive.
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Old 05-11-2014, 05:08 PM   #244
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Floating plants don't know where "up" is, so they tend to grow in a gnarled form, twisting, looping around, etc. Then when you finally plant them in the substrate it takes quite awhile for them to begin to grow up instead of in random directions.

You normally plant stem plants with no roots on them. They are just cuttings. You should poke them down into the substrate as deep as you can, preferably at an angle, so they can't float back out. This is easy with long tweezers.
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Old 05-30-2014, 01:57 AM   #245
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Hoppy are you saying that if I buy a stem plant that has roots I should cut it to a bare stem and plant it?


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Old 05-30-2014, 03:30 AM   #246
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Hoppy are you saying that if I buy a stem plant that has roots I should cut it to a bare stem and plant it?


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No, I'm not saying that. Most stem plants are cuttings from other plants, so they are rootless when you get them. Most of us tend to prune our stem plants and plant the cut off parts to get a denser growth of that plant, or to get rid of the bad looking base of the plant. There really isn't any reason to plant rooted stem plants, since they quickly send out new roots if there are few or no roots already there. In natural settings many, if not most stem plants reproduce in part by shedding the top part which floats away and eventually roots itself back into shallow water. Just think, the stem plant cutting you get may be a piece of a 100 year old plant!!
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Old 05-30-2014, 05:39 AM   #247
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Hoppy are you saying that if I buy a stem plant that has roots I should cut it to a bare stem and plant it?
Hoppy is right, but I am not sure he answered your question directly.
If I do get stem plants with roots, I do cut most, if not all of the roots, off before planting. The existing roots will most likely rot anyways.

With rozette plants like swords, I trim the roots to about 2", just long enough to keep the plant in the substrate.

The above does not apply to rizhome plants like anubias and ferns and I tend to leave the roots of crypts alone.

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Old 05-30-2014, 05:42 AM   #248
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Hoppy and OVT, thanks for clearing that up. I was worried that I was supposed to cut my stems bare before planting :P
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Old 06-20-2014, 11:45 PM   #249
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Awesome list very helpful! Thanks

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Old 08-08-2014, 12:25 PM   #250
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Very good listing. Was pondering with the idea of setting up a garden for a very long time. These suggestions should help.
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