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Old 07-29-2009, 06:14 PM   #46
hydrophyte
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nice. it looks like your plants perked up again--shipping and change of environment is always rough on them. you'll really like that sword if it grows for you.

i have often wondered about cleaning scratches and etching from glass(?). i have run into more than a few used glass tanks that were too badly scratched up to be of much use. people are clueless about cleaning their glass and so often scrape it up with sand.

i ought to send some more of that Bacopa. that Oplismenus basket grass is a really neat-looking plant, but rather difficult to manage. on the other hand Bacopa covers those Trellis Rafts fast and makes a nice floating carpet.
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Old 07-30-2009, 02:04 AM   #47
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I did a long google search a few days ago and found:
http://www.thewatergardenshop.com/marginal.html
http://www.watergarden.org/Pond-Supp...and-Bog-Plants
http://www.watergarden.org/Pond-Supp...w-Water-Plants
http://www.liveaquaria.com/product/a...t=1&page_num=1
https://www.pondmegastore.com/shop/home.php?cat=281
I was amazed about how many plant stores were out there, selling plants suitable for a riparium. Once I realized that the magic words were "water garden" it was easy.

Yesterday I visited a local "water garden" store, expecting to be thrilled. Nope, thrilled wasn't the word. This is a very large nursery, with lots of fountain sculptures for sale, and a small selection of what might be suitable plants, but they were almost totally uncared for, full of algae, and vastly overgrown.

I can remember many years ago the Woolworth store used to sell llittle 2" pots of various houseplants, many of which might have been suitable, but I haven't seen anything like that around here now.

Ripariums look to me like a good way to re-invigorate ones enthusiasm for versions of this hobby, with the added attraction of being a "house plant" hobby as well. Now, I'm just about at the point of buying a 56 column tank at Petsmart, and getting more serious about this. Oh, who wants to tell my wife?
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Old 07-30-2009, 05:09 AM   #48
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here's another one with a wild selection:

http://waterscapesnursery.com/WaterGardenPlants.htm

WaterScapes has a lot of stuff that nobody else seems to offer. however, they are wholesale-only.

Plant Delights Nursery in North Carolina has a wide selection of interesting plants and just about the nicest online catalog i have seen:

http://www.plantdelights.com/

they don't offer stock specifically for water gardening, but with research one can find a number of things in their list suitable for ponds and ripariums. i have acquired a number of nice plants from Plant Delights.

i think that a 56 column would be a great shape for this and i also have my eyes on one. this model has enough vertical space to accommodate several really cool plants that are squeezed in smaller tanks, and it also has good depth front-to-back (18").

if you start looking around for new stock it is important to be mindful of pest prevention and control (another article i need to write!). riparium displays might be somewhat lower maintenance than most traditional planted tank setups, but what you gain in relatively fewer algae problems is made up for with the extra diligence required to keep out and control insect pests. the ones that i have run into include the following: aphids, spider mites, mealy-bugs.

the most important measure to take in keeping these out is proper treatment of new plants to avoid new pest introductions into your riparium display. here are the steps that i take with all new marginal/emergent plants that i acquire:
  1. pull plant from pot and shake potting media away from roots. trim long roots and rinse off remaining potting media.
  2. dunk plants in water in a container such as an unoccupied aquarium or 5-gallon pail. sink plants all the way to bottom and keep down with small terra cotta pot or similar weight.
  3. be mindful of bugs that might float to top alive. remove any floating leaves or other bits of debris. rinse or wipe down rim of container in order to wash away and squash bugs.
  4. keep plants underwater for ~12 hours.
  5. certain kinds of plants will soften underwater and become susceptible to drying with re-exposure to non-humid air. keep treated plants in covered, high-humidity enclosure for a few days, gradually expose to increased air circulation.
  6. some plants might also sustain some leaf damage while underwater. trim away any dead or badly damaged leaves.
this treatment has always worked for me.

i also have recommendations for controlling pests for cases where they might find their way into a display. in general, bad infestations can be wiped out with thorough dunking of all plants and cleaning of the tank glass panels, while minor outbreaks can often be eradicated with careful and repeated spot-treating. i should start a thread and also a more formal article about this.
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Old 07-30-2009, 05:25 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
Ripariums look to me like a good way to re-invigorate ones enthusiasm for versions of this hobby, with the added attraction of being a "house plant" hobby as well. Now, I'm just about at the point of buying a 56 column tank at Petsmart, and getting more serious about this. Oh, who wants to tell my wife?
it seems as though tending a nice riparium display might be for some an engaging intersection of several different areas of hobby gardening, including pond-keeping, houseplants, bonsai, tropical/greenhouse specimens and planted aquaria.

there really are a lot of different plants that might be suitable for this.
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Old 08-02-2009, 02:44 PM   #50
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All of the crypts I moved from my 45 gallon, with CO2 tank, to the riparium underwater portion have now melted away all of their leaves. I expected this, but it is always a bit disappointing when it happens. So, now to wait to see if they all send out new leaves.

Yesterday I ordered a couple of plants, http://www.thewatergardenshop.com/ogonsweetflag.html and http://www.thewatergardenshop.com/302.html which is a sign I am deeply infected with the riparium bug! I'm very curious to see how big the plants they sell are, since this is a pond plant supply place, normally dealing with much, much larger "water gardens" than my 15 gallon one. If the quantity is anything like as big as I expect, I will have a lot to share, and will want to share them quickly. Does anyone want the "left-overs"?
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Old 08-03-2009, 12:37 AM   #51
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you'll really like that A. gramineus 'Ogon'. do make sure to de-bug anything new that you might add to your tank. Acorus does best if you plant it such that the rhizome sits on top of the substrate and with the roots down in the substrate.

i had a some of that Bacopa caroliniana a while back, but it wouldn't grow for me. it is a handsome carpeting plant so it will be of interest to see what it does for you.
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Old 08-05-2009, 09:37 PM   #52
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My plants arrived from Hughes Water Gardens today. Wow! Pond plants come in giant size compared to aquarium plants. Here is what I got:

The plants are soaking in a 5 gallon bucket now, but late tonight I plan to put small portions of each in planters and into the riparium. That means I will have a lot of good plants left - Acorus gramineus "Ogon" and Bacopa caroliniana. Who wants them, for the price of priority mail only. Otherwise I have no place to keep them alive. I won't put this on swap n shop for awhile.
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Old 08-06-2009, 06:54 AM   #53
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Nice first riparium hoppy!
I enjoyed your story -ah- stories on the glass cleaning
Not to change the subject or hijack the thread
But Wow! Question for Hydro

Aphids can be a plant pest in a riparium?

Didnt think those little bugs would like that environment at all.
Was thinking I need to read up on this because I treat my rose garden for aphids, and the only thing that works is ground treatments that kill the ants that farm the aphids. Or thats the way I understand it anyway.
MD
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Old 08-06-2009, 07:00 AM   #54
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Not just aphids but knats. What to do?
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Old 08-06-2009, 07:20 AM   #55
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Yes you certainly can get insect pests in these riparium setups. The worst ones are spider mites (actually arachnids, not insects) because they can badly disfigure the plant leaves. The other ones that I have observed--aphids, scale and mealy bugs--only start to cause plant damage when they become very numerous.

The best measure to take to prevent pest infestations is proper treatment of all new material that goes into display, as described above. Obviously, you can't use any kind of chemical bug killer on plants that are going to go with fish. But every time that I have done it the overnight dunk in water has apparently done away with hitchhiking bugs. Drowning can also be used to treat individual plants or the whole display in cases where insects do get in.

I have seen small numbers of black fungus gnats a few times in my ripariums and terrarium setups too, but they don't seem to hurt anything and have always died off and disappeared after a time. In cases of bad infestations of gnats one could use yellow sticky traps to suppress the adult gnats:

http://www.biconet.com/traps/bugstix.html
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Old 08-06-2009, 02:53 PM   #56
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What about using natural means, like lady bugs or mantids? Not sure how feasible that would be in a riparium, but the thought came to mind. We used to keep both an Anole lizard in the kitchen and a praying mantis in the living room on hanging plants, in FL there is a lot that gets into the house and even proliferates in it, and both of these critters stayed around for a long time. Of course, this wouldn't work in my riparium plan, where the Blue Gularis would quickly jump up and devour anything moving overhead.

I've even introduced jumping spiders to the house, you don't know how many times I've seen these guys in action. They act like they're doing piece work.
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Old 08-06-2009, 03:26 PM   #57
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Quote:
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Thanks, I will try to get some today and try it. A 10% sulphuric acid, made to adjust pH down in spas didn't touch it. Maybe if I could keep the surface wet with it for 4 hours, but I can't figure out a good way to do that. I just laid the tank on the front glass, propped the front up slightly, and poured the acid on the glass, and left it for about 15 minutes. Then I stood it back up and used a folded paper towel to scrub for another 15 minutes. Little, if any effect.
Need some washed mineralized delta clay for the sediment?

Regards,
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Old 08-06-2009, 05:31 PM   #58
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What about using natural means, like lady bugs or mantids? Not sure how feasible that would be in a riparium, but the thought came to mind. We used to keep both an Anole lizard in the kitchen and a praying mantis in the living room on hanging plants, in FL there is a lot that gets into the house and even proliferates in it, and both of these critters stayed around for a long time. Of course, this wouldn't work in my riparium plan, where the Blue Gularis would quickly jump up and devour anything moving overhead.

I've even introduced jumping spiders to the house, you don't know how many times I've seen these guys in action. They act like they're doing piece work.
Well the dunk treatment really works very well for disinfecting new nursery stock and knocking down any pest that might get into the display. The worst pest, spider mites, are I believe too small for ladybugs to use as food, but easy to kill off with dunking. Spider mites can even be stopped by spraying with water or otherwise raising humidity, becasue they can only reproduce in warm, dry conditions. I did get mealybugs into my 65 once, and it was a pain to take everything out and dunk it, because there are a lot of plants in there, but I'm sure ladybugs would have just crawled right out the top.

However, I have tried to think of display animals that one could keep in the emersed area and I recently ran across some descriptions of keeping mantids as vivarium subjects. The right kind of mantid might do alright in a riparium because many are strictly arboreal so they wouldn't really need a land area and could just crawl around on the foliage. One would have to select smaller species so that they wouldn't knock the foliage down. There are apparently quite a few tropical species in circulation among hobbyists. Here is one vendor site:

http://mantiskingdom.com/index.php?m...6b0d8fd800cead

Of course, mantids wouldn't solve any of those plant pest problems. In fact, one would have to add bugs to the riparium display--it looks as though most will eat either crickets or fruit flies--in order to maintain them.
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Old 08-06-2009, 05:47 PM   #59
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Well the dunk treatment really works very well for disinfecting new nursery stock and knocking down any pest that might get into the display. The worst pest, spider mites, are I believe too small for ladybugs to use as food, but easy to knock down with dunking. Spider mites can even be stopped by spraying with water or otherwise raising humidity, becasue they can only reproduce in warm, dry conditions. I did get mealybugs into my 65 once, and it was kind of a pain to take everything out and dunk it, because there are a lot of plants in there, but I'm sure ladybugs would have just crawled right out the top.

However, I have tried to think of animals that one could keep in the emersed area and I recently ran across some descriptions of keeping mantids as vivarium subjects. The right kind of mantid might do alright in a riparium because many are strictly arboreal so they wouldn't really need a land area and could just crawl around on the foliage. One would have to select smaller species so that they wouldn't knock the foliage down. There are apparently quite a few tropical species in circulation among hobbyists. Here is one vendor site:

http://mantiskingdom.com/index.php?m...6b0d8fd800cead

Of course, mantids wouldn't solve any of those plant pest problems. In fact, one would have to add bugs to the riparium display--it looks as though most will eat either crickets or fruit flies--in order to maintain them.
Wow Yeah, mantids eat crickets, small grasshoppers and moths, the smaller ones may eat fruit flies. I used to love to catch them and keep them for a week or two, feeding them was always fun.
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Old 08-06-2009, 07:37 PM   #60
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Need some washed mineralized delta clay for the sediment?

Regards,
Tom Barr
Too late! I already collected more river silt and used that. I'm almost sure I will be replacing my 45 gallon aquarium with a 56column riparium in the next month or so, and will be looking for something then, if you still have it.
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