Rimless tank with overflow water level height?
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Old 01-20-2014, 08:55 PM   #1
pianofish
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Rimless tank with overflow water level height?


Hey everyone,

I'm in the works of setting up a 60 gallon "rimless" tank with front and back euro bracing. Its a custom built tank I recently bought, however after seeing the mitered trim, I derimmed and will be adding 2" eurobracing on front and back. Left trim on the bottom.
Tank dimensions are (36" L X 19" W X 20" H) I know they are oddball dimensions, but they are the correct ones, I've measured.

So this will be an internal external overflow setup similar to crazy mittens system.

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...395426&page=13

Normally on a drilled tank, most reefers keep their water level about 1-2" inches below the top of the tank glass. Meaning they position their overflow that far down which keeps the water level at that point constantly. (evaporation happens in the sump, so you never see it.) Usually this is done with tanks that have trim on them, so you never actually see the water line, but also done on rimless too.

My concern is that, if I'm going to all this trouble on the tank, I want it to look its best and don't want a 2" gap between the top of the water and lip of the glass, its just not appealing to me.

So how far up can I safely have the water level? And what are the pros/cons of having the water too high/ or too low?

This will be a bean animal overflow setup, so risks of flooding tankside are mitigated. More concerned with overall aesthetics and trimming maintenance.

Right now I'm considering putting the internal box .5" -.75" below the tank lip. What do you think?

Thanks,
Joshua
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Old 01-20-2014, 11:40 PM   #2
boxboy
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tanks water level being .5" -.75" from the rim is risky!
Sump are not perfect, the main reason people leave a 2" space from the rim is so that in the event of something going wrong, we see the problem and correct before it floods.
Besides, water level will change slightly day to day with a sump. Lastly, how would you get your hands in the tank without flooding if its thats full anyways? I have ran a few sumps for reefs before and some DIY bucket sumps. Keep in mind, flooding likely wont happen, but the risk is still there. I would suggest 1" at most below the rim.
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Old 01-21-2014, 03:20 AM   #3
datsunissan28
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Take a look at my 60 gallon rimless cube in the tank journals. I used a closed system with my overflow and keep the water level within a half inch of the top or less.
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Old 01-21-2014, 06:02 AM   #4
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Yeah, I guess I'll have to just do a hand test and put both arms completely submerged into the tank, and see how far the water level rises. Then I'll leave another 1/4"-3/8" more than that. My major concern is not slopping the water around during maintenance, but I can always drain a little water before doing a big trim anyway.
I feel like 1" wouldn't be too bad if I absolutely had to, this is a 20" tall tank, so 1" wouldn't be that big of a deal. So we will see.

Thanks boxboy and datsun for your experiences.

Keep the experiences coming,
Joshua
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Old 01-21-2014, 02:32 PM   #5
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here's a trick i learned within the last few years of owning tanks.

don't put your arms in the tank when it is full
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Old 01-22-2014, 01:33 AM   #6
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So I think, just to be safe, I'm gonna go with 1" below the lip of the tank. I feel like that would be a safe distance for splashing purposes, and I've looked at a few more rimless tanks of this size, and it looks like the norm.

And yeah scapegoat, definitely not haha! I've done that before, and its much harder when you have to wipe spillage from all 4 sides lol

Thanks again guys,
Joshua
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Old 03-19-2014, 02:17 PM   #7
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Don't forget that when you turn the return pump off some of the tank water will flow back into the sump. This will give you a little more wiggle room.
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Old 03-19-2014, 02:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pianofish View Post
And yeah scapegoat, definitely not haha! I've done that before, and its much harder when you have to wipe spillage from all 4 sides lol

Thanks again guys,
Joshua
haha yup... that "oh crap... where was my brain on that one" moment
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Old 03-22-2014, 07:42 AM   #9
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Just realized something. I can have the water level right around .75"-.5" because I will be using an overflow. So the excess water will just go down to the sump. Not spillover. Doh!!! Am I thinking correctly? So as long as I make a enough room in te sump for the water flow from the tank being off drain back and a little extra wiggle room for the runoff from sticking in my hands. I should be good I think?
Joshua
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Old 03-22-2014, 08:25 AM   #10
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Yes that is correct. Spillover is only a concern on HOB overflow setups. Just make sure your sump can handle the water that will drain until it's below the overflow.
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Old 03-23-2014, 08:42 PM   #11
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Put your hand and arm(s) in the tank slowly, and watch to make sure the overflow is going into the sump, and that the flood is not carrying leaves or anything that could block the system. At worst I would think the Bean Animal system would simply run the emergency overflow for a few seconds, and it should work just fine. However, suddenly adding that much volume (hands and arms) might overwhelm the system, and the water could still go over the sides before the emergency overflow can catch up.

It makes a big difference that you are working with a larger tank.
If it was just a little tank, then the volume of just one hand might over do it. I have overestimated the safe amount of hand and arm to put into a 10 gallon tank several times. But larger tanks have a larger safety volume before they overflow.
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Old 03-24-2014, 08:54 PM   #12
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I don't know a lot about sumps but one thing has not been addressed which is fish jumping. The lower the water level, the less of the risk. Some claim certain fish don't jump but I have had every type of fish jump when the water level is too high. I would think 1 inch would be the absolute minimum you would want from water line to top of tank.
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