Are the rules really different for planted tanks?
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > General Planted Tank Forums > Low Tech Forum


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-13-2014, 09:05 PM   #1
Moni
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 9
Default

Are the rules really different for planted tanks?


It's occurring to me that the rules are different for planted tanks. I've been keeping Red Cherry Shrimp and Endlers for over 10 years and have discovered recently that they can be kept in a much smaller tank if is cycled, heavily planted, and not overcrowded with inhabitants. In the past I found that I needed at least a 10 gallon to keep the shrimp happy and healthy and at least a 5 gallon for guppies or endlers. Now after experimenting with planted bowls holding only 1-2 gallons of water I'm finding that they do quite well. This is great news for people who only have room for a fish bowl and still want to enjoy keeping fish and/or shrimp. No pumps and filters needed either. Have any of you also found this to be the case? Can you keep fish in a well planted tank or bowl that you would not be able to if it was not planted? I myself have fish aquariums all over my house and a small "fish room" to boot. Still it's fun to create planted bowls and share some with friends.
Moni is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-13-2014, 09:21 PM   #2
jennesque
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (9/100%)
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 86
Default

I wouldn't do a bowl for something that needs a heated tank /stable temperatures. I don't know if shrimp are ok with potential temp swings but I know most fish are, and something that is only a few gallons is hard to keep stable as far as the temperature.

However, I would agree that a heavily planted tank will greatly help with the bioload. I wouldn't personally suggest overstocking a tank because it's heavily planted, but I think you can get away with less filtration and slightly less PWC with all the plants.
Heavily planted tanks are a wonderful idea if you want to keep a large community of fish that like dense vegitation, access to dim lighting, and calm waters.
jennesque is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-14-2014, 12:44 AM   #3
THE V
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
THE V's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: California
Posts: 413
Default

How about these rules:

Rule 1: Plants are living organisms and have needs.
Rule 2: There is no "one size fits all" for planted tanks. Lots of variables.
Rule 3: You will get Algae
Rule 4: You will get Snails
Rule 5: You will screw up repeatedly
Rule 6: NO WHINING ALLOWED!! (This is always a rule in every situation).

I've got a healthy breeding cherry shrimp tank with around 100 individuals in a 2.5 gallon hex. It's got a cute little heater, nternal filter, cypts & a ton of hair algae. I feed them when I'm home but then I'll travel for a couple of weeks and they still do just fine.
THE V is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2014, 01:30 PM   #4
Moni
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 9
Default

I don't usually use heaters because my house stays at a comfortable temperature. The lowest room with my 55 gal. tank can gets down to the lower 60s at night so I have a heater in there. I mostly raise wild guppies, endlers, cherry shrimp and am trying with opae ulas. None of those are very picky with temperature, although the cherrys stop breeding at lower temps. No opae babies yet, but they are doing well. Our unheated 45 gal. Upstairs recently produced a brood of baby cory cats...so adorable.
Those rules The V listed are true. Yup.
Moni is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2014, 03:44 PM   #5
ufimych
Planted Member
 
ufimych's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Buchanan, Virginia, USA
Posts: 222
Default

I used to keep even tetras and barbs this way, the lowest tech, no filters or pumps, just a water heater for winter months. If the tank is not overcrowded, with guppies and shrimp you do not need a big one. However, even in a small tank, water stratification will take place, being too cold near the bottom and much warmer right under your light bulbs. It would be still helpful to make water moving by some convection at least periodically. Under natural outdoors conditions water is moving by wind or by big fish and even terrestrial animals, entering water. Some circulation, at least periodically, is beneficial for plants and your critters.
ufimych is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2014, 04:09 PM   #6
twentypoundtabby
Planted Member
 
twentypoundtabby's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Arvada, Co
Posts: 246
Default

I currently have two 2.5 gallon aquariums, both with heaters, both with sponge filters and both choking with plants. They aren't pretty, but they aren't meant to be pretty. One has cherry shrimp that are constantly breeding - worse than the endlers. And the other one has endlers constantly breeding so that I'm constantly moving them out to larger aquariums. The endler tank will be torn down soon since they seem to breed just fine in a 20 gallon with cardinal tetras.

I wouldn't put cardinals in such a small tank.

I actually didn't have snails for years until I did a plant trade with somebody else and now I have the dreaded bladder snails.
__________________
2 2.5s, 3 10s, 2 20s, 1 29. Low light, low tech. Ponds
twentypoundtabby is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2014, 07:33 PM   #7
Diana
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Contra Costa CA
Posts: 8,351
Default

The tanks with no heater, filter, light or whatever may be OK, as long as the livestock are OK with the room conditions. If the power goes out can you maintain the room as warm as they need?

A small tank, with filter etc. and overstocked would be in trouble if the power went out.
A large % of the filtration is the plants, and they only do their thing when the light is on.
Filter (any water movement- power head, filter, air bubbler) is required to keep the O2 level high for the fish and bacteria. Again, plants won't do this when the light is off.

So, I can say, yes, the guidelines for stocking levels and equipment can be different, but the most basic rule of all still needs to be:
Set up the tank and be prepared for the 'worst case' scenario.
Diana is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2014, 11:50 PM   #8
1987
Planted Member
 
1987's Avatar
 
PTrader: (10/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Green Bay WI
Posts: 232
Default

I have three planted tanks.

One of them has been up and running for almost three years and probably would be overstocked if it was a normal tank. I only run a large sponge filter driven by an air pump, and it's my most stable tank.

One no matter what I put into it for some reason fish die. Everything is perfect, I think the fish just get beat up on the 2 hour ride home from the LFS I like to go to. Plants just zoom in this tank. It reminds me of when I used to run EI and C02 tanks.

My newest one cycled itself in less than a week and has been running super smooth. Fish are happy, but the plants just sit there like they are stunted. No new growth on anything, even the duck weed grows slowly.


The point of this post is that in the same house with the same dirt and same gravel same water I have three different situations. Just like regular tanks every planted tank is different and it will take some amount of trial and error to find a happy medium.
__________________
Making videos about fish stuff, and fixing things: http://www.youtube.com/user/Ifixstuf
1987 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-19-2014, 02:51 PM   #9
Moni
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 9
Default

All my tanks have mechanical filters. I've only recently started experimenting with bowls that are completely natural. Plants are natural filters and purifiers. The shrimp seem to really enjoy the bowls. They swim laps around in them which is something they don't do in the larger tanks. I think they like the round shape. I will try to post a video soon.
Moni is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-19-2014, 05:54 PM   #10
THE V
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
THE V's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: California
Posts: 413
Default

In mid-next month I'll be moving into a new office building. I've been thinking about doing a little 2 gallon bowl with cherry shrimp in it. I'll be topping it off with DI water cause I can't do a water change more than probably once per year.

I'm thinking some dwarf sag's and some smaller crypts might work out well in potting soil capped tank.

Perhaps I need to find some Alternanthera reineckii or another red plant that can take low tech conditions.
THE V is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-19-2014, 10:37 PM   #11
Moni
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 9
Default

I think it would probably work on an office desk if the temps don't get too low. I've read that RCS can tolerate down to 55-57 degrees. Here is a video I took of my 1.75 gallon planted shrimp bowl on my dining room table. There are 6 young RCS shrimp in here. The adult females I have are much more red than these. I do use a desk lamp occasionally on this one for better viewing. The shrimp don't always swim as much as they do in this video. A lot of the time they are cleaning and exploring the plants in the bowl. They are so much fun to watch. Shrimp are good cleaners too. They eat all kind of algae.
Moni is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-19-2014, 11:32 PM   #12
1987
Planted Member
 
1987's Avatar
 
PTrader: (10/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Green Bay WI
Posts: 232
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moni View Post
I think it would probably work on an office desk if the temps don't get too low. I've read that RCS can tolerate down to 55-57 degrees. Here is a video I took of my 1.75 gallon planted shrimp bowl on my dining room table. There are 6 young RCS shrimp in here. The adult females I have are much more red than these. I do use a desk lamp occasionally on this one for better viewing. The shrimp don't always swim as much as they do in this video. A lot of the time they are cleaning and exploring the plants in the bowl. They are so much fun to watch. Shrimp are good cleaners too. They eat all kind of algae. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YzWunOHiE8
Really wish I had the patience to do something like that. Looks greats
__________________
Making videos about fish stuff, and fixing things: http://www.youtube.com/user/Ifixstuf
1987 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-20-2014, 04:38 AM   #13
THE V
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
THE V's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: California
Posts: 413
Default

I was thinking about getting a desk lamp on a timer. I'll be honest I find every excuse possible to avoid sitting at my desk in the office.

I'm thinking that 2 days a month is more than sufficient.

My wife has asked me what fish I had in the little 2 gallon hex in the garage when the cherries swim like that. Nice little bowl.
THE V is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-20-2014, 05:42 AM   #14
AGUILAR3
Wannabe Guru
 
AGUILAR3's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Los Angeles 626
Posts: 1,016
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by THE V View Post
I can't do a water change more than probably once per year.
Why is that? It takes me no more than 30 seconds to scoop out and replace 2 cups of water on my 2g. If you aren't going to be in the office that much, why bother?
AGUILAR3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-20-2014, 08:45 PM   #15
Moni
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1987 View Post
Really wish I had the patience to do something like that. Looks greats
Thanks. It wasn't that much work to put together. I have an overgrowth of plants in my tanks, so getting those was not a problem. Everything I chose is low light and easy. When I have more time I'll list the plants and maybe a tutorial on exactly what I did if anyone is interested. I also use super glue gel to attach some of the plants where I want them. It's safe. I've been using it for years with no problems. I do water changes about once a month. Recently I found a little nano magnet on Amazon for cleaning round bowls. It works perfect.
Moni is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012