Livebearers flashing no ich
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Old 01-08-2014, 01:54 AM   #1
amcoffeegirl
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Livebearers flashing no ich


It seems like every time a start a tank of guppies they start flashing. Of course the tank is always fully cycled. They have come from local pet stores. I watch the tanks closely before selection. No sign of outward parasites. I treated with metro and they are eating well. They had been spitting kens flakes. The tank has been running for a year or more. Fish still flashing. Water changes on livebearer tanks about every 4-6 days. Parameters are good. I have not treated for gill flukes. Or ich because no sign of ich. I have 9 tanks so I'm not a newbie. My goldfish live long and healthy lives. My bettas are all 1-2 years now, 4 of those. I can't keep livebearers and I have hard water. It's frustrating trying to cure every batch of fish. Something is going on in my livebearer tanks and I can't figure it out.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:39 AM   #2
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I feel for you, amcoffeegirl.
I almost threw in the towel the first year into guppies because of everything you described.
In my case, the culprit was callamanus worms. They don't always show and can remain hidden. When you see them rearing their nasty heads (do they have heads?) from the mulm hole, it's pretty bad by then.

My females would be huge with pregnancy, take forever to drop, drop a few, then promptly die. The males and other females, juvies, etc. ate well, but just looked unthrifty, like something was off. Not always clampy, just a bit peeked.

It was a pain in the butt, but did the whole levamisole treatment with follow-up, and haven't had a problem since.

Now, I am a BIG believer in QT, for at least a month, and any new gup I get-no matter from who or where-will get the treatment before being introduced to the residents. I don't care if it seems like I am medicating unnecessarily. I will not go through it again. To this day, I haven't lost a gup to anything other than mishaps, culling, and old age.

I feel like such a weirdo at the pet stores. The first thing I inspect is the poop-chutes, and what kind of poo is lying around. Not 100%, but it can be a good indicator of a fish's health.
Other fish carry this as well, but it seemed like it affected and hit the livebearers' the worst.

It was the most frustrating thing I encountered with tropical fish, and almost turned me off them. I was ready to settle for a planted tank with snails as my livestock.
I'm glad I didn't. Because the enjoyment I get from them now is great.

Also, the more you have, the more likely something is to get sick. Just the law of averages. (I don't think pond snails know this law, and bettas are usually separately housed, so odds are in their favor)

I wish you much luck and success in finding out what the culprit is with yours.
Diagnosis can be the hardest part.

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Old 01-08-2014, 02:18 PM   #3
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Tried salt in the tank? It could be as simple as that.

Flashing can be anything from some protozoan or irritation.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:09 PM   #4
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I have a theory with regard's to guppies nowday's.
I believe that those that farm raise these fishes for sale in large number's discovered long ago, that they do seem to do better with a bit of salt so they keep the fishes with salt added to their tank's from babies to adult's as well.
These fishes being born and raised in water with perhap's a bit of salt added,,do poorly when plopped into freshwater with no salt.
They much more easily adapt to slightly brackish water like that they may have been raised in , than they do to straight freshwater.
Is but a theory,,but maybe something to ponder??
Have also seen in my tank's that IF you can get to second generation,,that the fish seem to be a bit more tolerant of wider GH.KH.level's.
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadmaster View Post
I have a theory with regard's to guppies nowday's.
I believe that those that farm raise these fishes for sale in large number's discovered long ago, that they do seem to do better with a bit of salt so they keep the fishes with salt added to their tank's from babies to adult's as well.
These fishes being born and raised in water with perhap's a bit of salt added,,do poorly when plopped into freshwater with no salt.
They much more easily adapt to slightly brackish water like that they may have been raised in , than they do to straight freshwater.
Is but a theory,,but maybe something to ponder??
Have also seen in my tank's that IF you can get to second generation,,that the fish seem to be a bit more tolerant of wider GH.KH.level's.
You know, that's an interesting theory and I would say it's worth more than a ponder. Guppies and Mollies are found in numerous streams and ponds here on my island, virtually in all flowing or year round bodies of water but most interestingly they seem to flourish in our one protected Brackish water mangrove.

I have actually seen guppies in the ocean where small tributary streams meet the ocean during very heavy periods of rain. The problem for guppies in the ocean besides obvious predators would be the temperature. However at a popular local beach next to a local rum distillery which uses sea water to cool its equipment and therefore its run off (pure sea water) is warmed. Locals call it "The Hot Pot". I have seen guppies in there looking quite happy.

Sorry for the rant guys.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:00 PM   #6
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+1 to the salt suggestion.
I've also noticed that new-to-my-water guppies tend to get constipated easily and flash from discomfort. A frozen pea softened in an aquarium saltwater solution helps both issues.

That's assuming they're healthy. I'm with Stef on quarantining new fish no matter where they come from. Internal parasites from a pet-store guppy claimed too many fish for me to ever take a chance again.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:30 PM   #7
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I use no salt, although during the horrible "Worm Days" (as it is now known), it was the first thing we tried.
Knock on wood, my guppies have been thriving for 3-4 years now with no issue.
Everyone does get shelled microwaved frozen peas twice a month. It's a pain shelling, quartering them, and distributing them in all the tanks, and not everyone likes them, but Momma says you got to eat your veggies occasionally.

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Old 01-08-2014, 09:44 PM   #8
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I forgot to add, I do believe different strains of guppies prefer different conditions, usually what they were born it.
They are found all over the world, and not called "The Million Fish" for nothing.

It's like the crayfish in the North look similar to the crawfish down here in the South,
different variety of the same species. Northern ones like cooler, rock bed streams, and Southern ones can be found building chimneys in brackish puddles. They adapted to what they have to work with and what they were born in.
(For the record: they do not taste alike and they do not taste like little lobsters at all)

Once again, personal experience and opinion, and I hope OP problems can be simply solved with salt. I wouldn't wish "The Worm Days" on anyone, not even a dog.

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Old 01-08-2014, 10:36 PM   #9
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I have used salt in my beginner days of fish keeping. I don't add it too much these days. I will try the peas and try some salt. Thanks guys. I really hope that works. I really love guppies and have a growing interest in platies. I forgot to mention my tanks are heated approx 78 ish.
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:44 PM   #10
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I fed some peas and added salt. I also had previously treated with metro. I did one treatment of prazi. And added frozen bloodworms to encourage eating. No more flashing right now. And they are getting fatter. Thanks guys.
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