Building a 10g paludarium, need plant help - Page 2
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > General Planted Tank Forums > General Planted Tank Discussion > Riparium/Terrarium/Vivarium


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-05-2013, 12:49 AM   #16
Open_Cages
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: CA
Posts: 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishies_in_Philly View Post
i would LOVE to know the source of this info (dendroboard i presume?) in fact, before i built my first paludarium for frogs many years ago, i could not find 1 case of a dart drowning. to this day, i still have yet to read one FACTUAL account of a frog drowning. oh, everyone has "heard" of it happening, but there's no proof. i have actually seen, with my own two eyes, Tincs not only jump in the water, but swim under water the length of their tank. i have seen my Mantellas do this as well. in my opinion, it's statements and thought processes like this that actually hold the dart hobby back, not allow it to progress.

my apologies if i offended anyone, i will climb down from my soap box now.
While I agree that darts rarely do drown, I stick with the old opinion: that darts do not like water (which they don't, imo).
Most people say that they are poor swimmers, which is not especially true, unless you are dealing with froglets. I have seen with my own eyes a dart (a vent) that was perfectly healthy, but crashed into the newly cleaned glass by the water until he no longer could keep himself above the water's surface. Attempts to save him were vain, as about 15 minutes in, he died (probably from head trama more so then drowning). And though these types of things can work well, the space can be used so much more practically! Hell, when does a dart ever get a meal from a water feature?

Also, about very few drowned fruit flies, what is your setup? When I was working with geckos a few years back close to 60% of the ff drowned. IS there a way to avoid this?
Open_Cages is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-05-2013, 02:13 PM   #17
Wy Renegade
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Wy Renegade's Avatar
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 369
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Open_Cages View Post
While I agree that darts rarely do drown, I stick with the old opinion: that darts do not like water (which they don't, imo).
Most people say that they are poor swimmers, which is not especially true, unless you are dealing with froglets. I have seen with my own eyes a dart (a vent) that was perfectly healthy, but crashed into the newly cleaned glass by the water until he no longer could keep himself above the water's surface. Attempts to save him were vain, as about 15 minutes in, he died (probably from head trama more so then drowning). And though these types of things can work well, the space can be used so much more practically! Hell, when does a dart ever get a meal from a water feature?

Also, about very few drowned fruit flies, what is your setup? When I was working with geckos a few years back close to 60% of the ff drowned. IS there a way to avoid this?
So maybe this is a stupid question, and to be honest I have never had darts, but why in the world would someone let a dart (which I understand are a pretty expensive frogs) crash into a newly cleaned glass over and and over until it couldn't keep itself above the water's surface AND then worry about trying to save it? Seems kind of silly to me, I would think that the logical thing to do would be to move it, so it quite crashing into the glass in the first place. Also, if they don't like water, why was the dart swimming in the water in the first place?

Not trying to offend, just don't see a whole lot of logic being applied in that story, so I'm curious.
Wy Renegade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:25 PM   #18
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default

So this is still a thing.



sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2013, 04:57 AM   #19
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default




With ~5.5 gal water
sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2013, 12:16 PM   #20
Fishies_in_Philly
Planted Tank Guru
 
Fishies_in_Philly's Avatar
 
PTrader: (9/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: phila., PA
Posts: 2,264
Default

looks very cool so what animal did you decide to keep in there?
Fishies_in_Philly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2013, 04:33 AM   #21
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default

Most likely, 1 frog and a trio of sparkling gouramis.
sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2013, 10:40 PM   #22
JeremyM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: California
Posts: 59
Default

Just my 2 for this project, I'd say that this is definitely not suitable for dart frogs. While they can certainly be kept in a 10 gallon with plenty of space (variables depending) and should have no trouble in a paludarium-style setup, I feel that your individual tank layout could not support any dart frog healthily. it looks like 1/2 of the volume is taken up by water, so that leaves you with a five gallon tank, and of that five gallons (species depending) less than half would be usable by terrestrial frogs. Darts need large amounts of leaf litter to keep them happy, and I can't see that working in this setup, as most of the leaves would probably just fall in the water and there's hardly a space wider than an inch or two's width (I'm not sure what's going on in the back corner). I can't be sure, but it appears that your soil is sodden with water, and therefore would not be able to support the necessary microfauna (springtails, dwarf isopods, nematodes etc) that are needed to stabilize the ecosystem and provide additional foraging items for the frogs. There's simply not enough solid land here to be able to support them. Any of the arboreal species would not work in the setup either; assuming you filled up the entire empty space with broad-leaved plants and such to provide the maximum amount of living space, they would still have about six inches of height at most to move around in; in a 10 gallon, what I consider the smallest acceptable tank for any dart frog, arboreals need a vertically oriented tank so they get the most out of the 18 inches height possible for climbing. most darts also do better in groups, which you would not be able to provide here.

as for alternate stocking ideas, this setup looks perfect for a fire-bellied toad. You can still plant it up as you had planned and it will love you for that, but it will actually utilize the water section as much as the land section. No fruit fly culturing to worry about here; they eat the standard crickets, mealworms, anythingthatmoves etc. that's the best species I can suggest that will go on land and use the water as it is; if that's not an issue, you could go for spotted floating frogs, which will stay almost exclusively floating on the top of the water (I have a couple of these guys just in my tank- they're awesome! or some smaller species of newt, say paddle-tailed, fire-bellied etc, though for those you'll want to watch the water temperature and at least place a layer of sand over your substrate to avoid impaction of the gravel.

Aside from that, this looks like a promising start. As for plants, many of the aquatic plants we know and love grow quite well emersed; ludwigia, hygrophila, bacopa, anubias, etc and won't have a problem with wet soil. The vast majority of stem plants take to emersed setup quite well, as long as they are transitioned properly and kept humid. You should really consider Microsorum species (java fern)- they take a bit longer to acclimate and need higher humidity to do so, but they work quite magnificently once they've been transitioned. HC makes a great carpeting plant and takes low light well enough emersed; riccia is also another good option, as well as most aquarium mosses (all but java and willow moss aren't fully aquatic). you should definitely get some Selaginella and creeping fig for the background (variety 'fig leaf' looks better imo); good sources for vivarium plants can be found here http://www.blackjungleterrariumsuppl...lants_c_1.html and here http://www.joshsfrogs.com/live-terrarium-plants-1.html, although many of these plants will have issues growing in your setup if the soil stays as wet as it appears to be.
good luck, hope this helps.
JeremyM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 12:12 AM   #23
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default

The corner is a 'bowl' with a net bottom touching the water. It is right now filled with orchid bark covered in coco fiber. I'm going to be adding another layer of substrate and dried leaves after my plants come in the mail.

Ruler and bottle cap for scale.







sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 01:40 AM   #24
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default

I've heard fire bellied toads and newts are destructive, and either will almost certainly kill any fish I put in either by eating them or secreting poison. My house gets far too hot for newts anyway. The floating frogs are very cute, I'll look into those more.
sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2013, 10:52 PM   #25
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default

And now we wait!


I'm not thrilled with my aquascaping but I should probably stop uprooting and moving things. It'll look better when it grows in. Right?





The moneywort is really taking off already.



I ordered a sinningia as well but it broke in half in the mail. I put the root in here and the leaves in the millipede tank, I hope at least one of them grows.





The water wisteria is still adjusting to being submerged I think.



In a couple weeks I'll start seeding the tank with springtails etc. There's already a fair amount of animal life in the water. I had fun with my microscope. Besides the humongous pond snail pictured, I found round worms, flat worms, segmented worms, copepods, and chironomid larvae.

Thank you very much, everyone who was helpful.
sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2013, 09:22 PM   #26
sheepsour
Algae Grower
 
sheepsour's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Kansas
Posts: 17
Default

Springtails and dwarf white isopods are in the top and RCS in the bottom. The begonia died but I knew it was a gamble when I put it in. Still not sure what to replace it with. The soil in that corner is wet but not soggy and the humidity is around 80%. Rhaphidophora is doing well. Bacopa is doing so well I'm afraid it might grow up out of the tank and strangle me as I sleep. The water portion had to be used as a temporary home for a very lively burrowing fish so the wisteria is gone, but the myrio and rotala are still growing.
sheepsour is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012