DIY 10 Gallon Stand $18.46 (With Pictures) - Page 2
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:47 AM   #16
xmas_one
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Jesus Christ, this is a cool stand, I really wish the armchair engineers would shut up about the design.
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Old 07-09-2013, 09:59 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xmas_one View Post
Jesus Christ, this is a cool stand, I really wish the armchair engineers would shut up about the design.
But...I'm an actual engineer

I don't think anyone has a problem with the design. Clearly it works, but I think pointing out that it may be more top heavy than the traditional 10g wood stand is important in case someone tries to replicate this and ends up putting it on carpet or something.
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:02 AM   #18
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looks great. Just what you need. I'd like to build one. I have a 10 gallon tank just sitting here and i don't have a stand. Light, filter, substrate, pump everything but no stand. I would build one but they threw me out of shop class in HS.
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:10 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronados View Post
But...I'm an actual engineer

I don't think anyone has a problem with the design. Clearly it works, but I think pointing out that it may be more top heavy than the traditional 10g wood stand is important in case someone tries to replicate this and ends up putting it on carpet or something.
Yeah, everyone's an engineer here... LOL.
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Old 07-09-2013, 01:39 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
Yes, I knew it was for a 10 gallon tank, and I agree that it will work fine for that. But, I thought I read that someone wanted to use the design for a 40 gallon tank, which was what my comment was aimed at. Re-reading it, I see that I was wrong - he wanted a 40 inch high stand, not one for a 40 gallon tank. My mistake!
That's okay we all make mistaks !


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Originally Posted by thelub View Post
Your bottom circumference is the same as your top. Add the extra weight of the tank on the top, it will have a high center of gravity making it more susceptible to tipping.
Ohh okay now that makes sense. Mmm I wonder if adding additional weight to the bottom of the stand would help? Like mentioned earlier, evenually i'll add some siding and backing which will hopfully help re-inforce everything.


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I'd say he's probably fine with tipping as long as the stand is on a hard surface like the tiles he has there. It looks taller than a standard 10g wooden stand. I wouldn't trust it on carpet.
Oh okay thanks, And yes it is taller then a standard 10 gallon stand. I'm a bit taller then you're average Canadian male so I made the stand tall on purpose.


Quote:
Originally Posted by xmas_one View Post
Jesus Christ, this is a cool stand, I really wish the armchair engineers would shut up about the design.
lmao, finally someone with something nice to say. Thank you my friend, not all of us are "armchair engineers" haha!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronados View Post
But...I'm an actual engineer

I don't think anyone has a problem with the design. Clearly it works, but I think pointing out that it may be more top heavy than the traditional 10g wood stand is important in case someone tries to replicate this and ends up putting it on carpet or something.
So in the future if I were to build a new stand for another tank like a 20 gallon or something, How would you have built it?


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Originally Posted by morelight View Post
looks great. Just what you need. I'd like to build one. I have a 10 gallon tank just sitting here and i don't have a stand. Light, filter, substrate, pump everything but no stand. I would build one but they threw me out of shop class in HS.
Thanks man, It wasn't too hard to build but have power tools is a definite asset. You should set up your 10 gallon and make a sweet stand for it. There's nothing like building something on you own.
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Old 07-09-2013, 08:27 PM   #21
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Adding some weight to the bottom would definitely balance things out, but in all reality its probably good as is.
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:48 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TorontoPlantMan View Post
So in the future if I were to build a new stand for another tank like a 20 gallon or something, How would you have built it?
If you were to build it taller than the standard 20g stand like with this 10g, I would make the base slightly deeper in proportion. If you were to increase the height by 20%, increasing the base depth by 20% too would be the safe approach. Again, this really only applies if you're going to be putting it on some kind of soft surface.. Adding weight to the bottom works too, but isn't nearly as effective since any force applied at the top of the stand (weight of tank/tipping forces, etc) is leveraged by the height divided by the depth to where the weight is placed at the bottom. You would need a lot of counterweight to achieve the same effect as an inch or two more base depth.
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Old 07-10-2013, 02:09 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronados View Post
Adding weight to the bottom works too, but isn't nearly as effective since any force applied at the top of the stand (weight of tank/tipping forces, etc) is leveraged by the height divided by the depth to where the weight is placed at the bottom. You would need a lot of counterweight to achieve the same effect as an inch or two more base depth.
Can you explain this further? I'm prepping to build a stand for a 40 breeder and want to know as much as possible.

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Old 07-10-2013, 04:42 AM   #24
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Just go a few inches bigger on the circumference on the bottom.

Or add an earthquake strap to the wall and you'll be good too.
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Old 07-10-2013, 05:08 AM   #25
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Building a top and bottom frame and using wood lengths between the two frames is stronger. RC has a very long thread about this type of frame - designed by an engineer yet. http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1169964

OTOH I built a stand just like this 10 gallon one for a 150 gallon tank and cut it down for the 100 gallon tank but using lag bolts and for the 12 years it was in use it never budged. I sure was concerned after learning that that wasn't a good design.

What about tying the stand to the wall? Have to agree, a 100 pound tank could easily be moved accidently.
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:04 AM   #26
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Sorry I offended you, that's why I hate saying anything even remotely negative on a forum. If I see something that looks potentially unsafe I do think I should point it out though. If I'm wrong, great, at least no one gets hurt.
Maybe I like to overbuild things too much, but better safe than sorry.
Racking loads would be the forces the stand is subjected to if you push on the stand or tank only at the top and not the bottom. Your stand isn't going anywhere front to back, and being smaller may even be just fine for many years side to side but other than the screws you used to put it together your stand design doesn't resist side to side loading.
If it works for you then that's all you need. I just don't want anyone getting hurt by having a tank come down on them.

One of the reasons I think bracing is so important is because of the Nisqually earthquake in 2001. I was living in Puyallup, WA about 30 miles north of the epicenter that day and had a 100G reef setup at the time with no earthquake straps. I was working in Centralia, WA where I now live about 30 miles south of the epicenter. The parking lot of the apt complex I was working at actually had a wave travel thru it. I got to spend the rest of my day wondering if I was going to find 100g of saltwater mixed with dead fish and coral on my floor when I got home. I was lucky and the tank didn't fall over but there was plenty of water that splashed out of it.
If you live anywhere earthquake prone, or just have your tank in a high traffic area, earthquake straps are cheap peace of mind.
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:26 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amberoze View Post
Can you explain this further? I'm prepping to build a stand for a 40 breeder and want to know as much as possible.

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You don't really need to worry about tipping on a 40g breeder. The tipping point of any tank/stand setup will be when the center of gravity (effectively the center of the tank) passes over the front or rear of the stand bottom lip. Now, this tip angle changes with respect to tank size, because while stand height stays relatively constant for most tank sizes (say, 24-30"), the tank depth changes quite a bit percentage-wise (from 10" - 18"). On a 10g, because the stand height is large relative to 1/2 the tank depth (~6:1), the tip angle is much smaller than say, a stand for a 40g breeder (where the ratio is ~3:1).

A 100lb 10g tank on a 30" tall stand with a footprint identical to the stand will need about a 16.7lb horizontal force applied at the top of the stand to start to tip it forwards or backwards on a hard surface. If you were to make the footprint 2" deeper in front and back (14" depth total), it would take 23.3lb horizontal force. To achieve this same effect, you would need to add a 40lb counterweight at the center of the base of the stand. In both cases, the tip angle is around 11 degrees. These results are more dramatic with larger tank sizes as the counterweight needs to scale up with tank weight.

Edit: Oops, 10g height is 13 inches. The figures are approximated anyways, as I assumed the water isn't shifting as the stand tilts, when in reality the stand will tip over before 11 degrees due to the CG shifting with the water.

Last edited by Chronados; 10-10-2013 at 04:23 PM..
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Old 07-10-2013, 06:46 PM   #28
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Don't forget the momentum of the water, as when its CG shifts, it's also going to be in motion.

My main concern with a stand of this type is the racking, as Hoppy mentioned. I don't know how seismically active the Toronto region is, but it wouldn't take much to topple if it got a little wavy.

This might be sacrilege, but would it be possible to take another short piece of 2x4 from the back of each leg to the wall and screw it into a wall stud? That would stop racking completely. The dimensions of your tank are probably pretty close to standard stud spacing, and it wouldn't harm the drywall in a way that isn't easily fixable when moving out.

Regardless, your design definitely scores points for speed and ease of construction.
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Old 07-10-2013, 11:34 PM   #29
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As most people have said already, you can get away with a lot of stuff with a 10gallon that won't work with a larger aquarium.

Interesting and simple design, and it wouldn't take more then a couple minor modifications to make it suitable for larger aquaria, mostly just insuring that the weight is directly supported by wood, and not screws/nails (lag bolts may be fine up to a certain size, just because of the larger surface area/stronger bolt)

And if you put some sort of backing/sheathing on it, that will likely address any issues with racking.

Even if you don't live in a quake prone area, I'd consider connecting both the top of the stand and the tank to the wall, just to prevent it getting knocked over or anything.

Also glad that someone else is giving DIY a try, I've talked to to many people who are afraid to try chopping up and screwing some bits of wood together without professional training.
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:02 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thelub View Post
Adding some weight to the bottom would definitely balance things out, but in all reality its probably good as is.
Okay thanks, I'll see if i can somehow do that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronados View Post
If you were to build it taller than the standard 20g stand like with this 10g, I would make the base slightly deeper in proportion. If you were to increase the height by 20%, increasing the base depth by 20% too would be the safe approach. Again, this really only applies if you're going to be putting it on some kind of soft surface.. Adding weight to the bottom works too, but isn't nearly as effective since any force applied at the top of the stand (weight of tank/tipping forces, etc) is leveraged by the height divided by the depth to where the weight is placed at the bottom. You would need a lot of counterweight to achieve the same effect as an inch or two more base depth.
Thanks Chronados, I'll keep this in mind for when I build a stand for a 40 breeder I would like to eventually purchase. This was my first project, and I didn't do too much research into it which I probably should have. I was just in a serious rush for a stand and money is a serious issue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lochaber View Post
As most people have said already, you can get away with a lot of stuff with a 10gallon that won't work with a larger aquarium.

Interesting and simple design, and it wouldn't take more then a couple minor modifications to make it suitable for larger aquaria, mostly just insuring that the weight is directly supported by wood, and not screws/nails (lag bolts may be fine up to a certain size, just because of the larger surface area/stronger bolt)

And if you put some sort of backing/sheathing on it, that will likely address any issues with racking.

Even if you don't live in a quake prone area, I'd consider connecting both the top of the stand and the tank to the wall, just to prevent it getting knocked over or anything.

Also glad that someone else is giving DIY a try, I've talked to to many people who are afraid to try chopping up and screwing some bits of wood together without professional training.
Unfortunately attaching it to the wall is not an option as the wall it's behind has no studs. I live in an older style apartment and the wall it is against is solid concrete and drywall or something. I'll be moving in less than 4 months so it serves no point. Thank you for your input though I appreciate it. Also this was my first DIY building project, The project wouldn't have been possible to pull off in 2 hours without the help of my dad. I'll have to put some more research into "Racking" and such for when I build a larger stand.
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