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Old 05-22-2013, 07:03 PM   #16
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Carbon leaching back toxins it has absorbed isnt a myth, but a lot of sub-par fish forums have created this whole thing that it is, but to be fair, incidents do vary based on the grade of the carbon, and what exactly is being leached back. A carbon cartridge is only good for 6 days max, high grade pellets maybe 2 weeks at best.

Either way carbon is crap, and a waste of money, nor is it needed IMO. If you have some stinky well water fine, but just for general use dont bother :-)
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Old 05-22-2013, 08:36 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrypticLifeStyle View Post
Carbon leaching back toxins it has absorbed isnt a myth, but a lot of sub-par fish forums have created this whole thing that it is, but to be fair, incidents do vary based on the grade of the carbon, and what exactly is being leached back. A carbon cartridge is only good for 6 days max, high grade pellets maybe 2 weeks at best.

Either way carbon is crap, and a waste of money, nor is it needed IMO. If you have some stinky well water fine, but just for general use dont bother :-)
It doesn't just happen on its own though. There has to be some other force acting on it to strip off the molecules.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:27 PM   #18
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Usually its PH related, but carbon wears down, and give enough flow/time there's nothing left of the carbon to hold anything. There's more scientific means of explaining other ways it can happen, one being on tom bars site, but to save myself from a long discussion, it isn't exactly a myth, and can happen, especially with detritus release :-)
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:52 PM   #19
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Carbon doesn't last long in my filters, I guess just from water eroding it?

I do not use it anymore, because anything that can be removed with carbon can also be removed by water change.


As far as nitrates being good or bad for shrimp, it's not the same as when you add nitrates as a fertilizer. When nitrates are present in high amounts in an aquarium that DOES NOT get fertilizers added to it, indicates a lot of decay, organic matter, phosphorus, etc that ARE harmful. High nitrates are simply an indicator that something is decomposing in there, and that you need to do a water change.

So instead of using plants to absorb lots of nitrates, try doing water changes instead.
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Old 05-22-2013, 11:09 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mordalphus View Post
...High nitrates are simply an indicator that something is decomposing in there, and that you need to do a water change.

So instead of using plants to absorb lots of nitrates, try doing water changes instead.
If you have shrimp that are sensitive to water changes, such as baby Taiwan bees, I think it makes sense to reduce the need for water changes by having lots of plants to absorb/use the nitrates that are present.
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Old 05-22-2013, 11:40 PM   #21
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If you are having nitrate problems in your baby taiwan bee tank, there is something wrong with your feeding schedule, hah.
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Old 05-23-2013, 12:04 AM   #22
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If you are having nitrate problems in your baby taiwan bee tank, there is something wrong with your feeding schedule, hah.
I'm not having nitrate problems.

I have babies in all of my Taiwan Bee tanks, so I try to minimize water changes in all of them. All of these tanks also have lots of plants, so I am really not sure what my nitrate levels would look like in a bare tank.

I do know that if I cut back too many plants in a pruning I can get an ammonia spike, so I assume the plants are using quite a bit of nitrate as well.
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Old 05-23-2013, 12:07 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrypticLifeStyle View Post
Usually its PH related, but carbon wears down, and give enough flow/time there's nothing left of the carbon to hold anything. There's more scientific means of explaining other ways it can happen, one being on tom bars site, but to save myself from a long discussion, it isn't exactly a myth, and can happen, especially with detritus release :-)
Agreed, and I mentioned in my original response that the break down of the carbon pellets themselves can lead to compounds being put back into the water. Too many people think though that carbon spontaneously releases things back into the water just because it can't absorb anymore, and that is false. The release of chemicals back into the water is due to issues on the atomic level for whatever reason (erosion, pH, higher affinity compounds, etc).
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Old 05-23-2013, 07:08 AM   #24
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What is up with the carbon talk? Isn't the op asking for nitrate?
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Old 05-23-2013, 01:09 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by pejerrey View Post
What is up with the carbon talk? Isn't the op asking for nitrate?
I would guess it is some what related, the op has been provided with multiple solutions, why not let this discussion get more technical, after all it's related


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Old 05-23-2013, 06:28 PM   #26
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As others mentioned, fast growing plants will suck up the nitrates best. Hornwort does a good job, anacharis, duckweed, and frogbit are some other good ones. In my tanks, I can almost watch hornwort grow it does so well. I think having tons of tiny leaves gives it more surface area to react with the water and soak up the nitrates.

Plants cannot replace routine maintenance and water changes though. They do help though.
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Old 05-24-2013, 07:13 AM   #27
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Plants can only absorb nitrates depending on that there is no other limiting factor such as lack of other nutrient like phosphate, co2 or light.

Plants do not only "suck up" nitrates they need all their nutrients in proportion . Therefore floaters are more efficient at this because they are closer to the light and using atmospheric co2.

Again, the problem is not nitrates is the process to get to nitrate where the problem is. No3 is pretty harmless itself.
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Old 05-24-2013, 07:22 AM   #28
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moss is perfect for taking up nitrate. shrimp love it too. it also doesnt need high light or nutrients which is why so many shrimp breeders and keepers just do bare tanks with moss.
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:56 PM   #29
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moss is perfect for taking up nitrate
Really? I thought moss needed very little nutrients thus not good at removing anything.

With a fully planted tank (lots of plants) I could only measure about 5ppm decrease in TDS maximum, with medium lights and co2 involved, so I doubt a few patches of moss in a shrimp tank (usually very poorly planted) will do anything with low light as its low metabolism.

I wish I could replicate the experiment with a heavily planted moss only tank.
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Old 05-24-2013, 05:09 PM   #30
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moss is perfect for taking up nitrate. shrimp love it too. it also doesnt need high light or nutrients which is why so many shrimp breeders and keepers just do bare tanks with moss.
It doesn't need high light or nutrients because it grows slowly. Slow growth = slow nutrient uptake = slow nitrate uptake.

Shrimp breeders do moss because its a great place for biofilm and other critters to grow.
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