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Old 05-06-2013, 06:04 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by wendyjo View Post
Nitrates shouldn't drop to 0 unless you are extremely heavily planted. 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite and readable nitrates is what you want.
my nitrites are still high, and my ammonia has dropped to almost 0ppm? should i be dosing more ammonia? or do a water change?
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:17 PM   #17
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ammonia has dropped to nearly 0 should i keep dosing? nitrites still high, should i be doing water changes?
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Old 05-06-2013, 10:21 PM   #18
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yea, you have to keep dosing ammonia to feed bacteria. if nitrites are off the chart, do a 50% water change, retest, and redose the ammonia
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:29 AM   #19
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Readable nitrates means you get a reading when you do the test. You're cycled when you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites, and readable nitrates. That means that you've got the bacteria that turns ammonia in to nitrites as well as the bacteria that turns nitrites into nitrates. Nitrates are the end product of the cycle.
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Old 05-10-2013, 12:53 PM   #20
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so my nitrites are still high, ive been dosing ammonia to keep it consistent. I also added a whole bunch of plants. Can anyone tell me if plants will feed or starve my bacteria during the cycle? right now im just trying to be patient as possible during the cycle.
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Old 05-10-2013, 12:59 PM   #21
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I never dose amonia I always let it run for a couple weeks then throw a golden wonder killi in there to help finish off the cycle they are tough as nails. Please dont grill me for my methods just how I cycle my new tanks. But I always throw some substrate from another tank in the bottom to help too
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Old 05-10-2013, 01:38 PM   #22
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I never dose amonia I always let it run for a couple weeks then throw a golden wonder killi in there to help finish off the cycle they are tough as nails. Please dont grill me for my methods just how I cycle my new tanks. But I always throw some substrate from another tank in the bottom to help too
would it hurt if i added more sand to my substrate? i would like to have a deep sand bed. Ive been to a aquarium store before, and they had sand bands that were as deep as 3-4" in every tank. Everything was complete healthy, sign of overfill fish in the tank, but all looked healthy. Plants were lushful green with low lighting.
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Old 05-11-2013, 04:15 AM   #23
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Old 05-11-2013, 03:05 PM   #24
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Fishless cycle:
1) Keep the ammonia at 3 ppm once a day, OR bring it only as high as 1 ppm, but do that twice a day.
REASON: Some plants do not like ammonia, and 1 ppm is all they can handle. The bacteria need to be fed in a way that represents the constant low level of ammonia that fish will produce. 3 ppm once a day will get used up by the bacteria and they will have a few hours with no food, and that is OK. 1 ppm twice a day is just about the same, as far as the bacteria are concerned, but safer for some plants.

2) Keep the nitrite under 5 ppm. These bacteria do not do too well when the nitrite rises too high. If you need to do water changes for high nitrite, then you might add less ammonia for a few days, until the nitrite removing bacteria catch up.

3) Plants and bacteria use many of the same nutrients. They will do this when the tank is fully running, too. So the short answer is Yes, having thriving plants will mean the bacteria population is smaller.
The more extended answer is that plants are also part of the bio filter. It does not matter whether the nitrogen is removed by bacteria or plants, as long as it is removed.
Having the plants well established and thriving when the fish are added is a very good way to make sure the plants are indeed doing well, and will handle the ammonia, CO2 and other things from fish, fish food and whatever else you add.

Substrate: Nitrifying bacteria live on all the surfaces in the tank. This includes the substrate. They do not live on the very top of each grain, these bacteria do not like the light. They will live on the under side of each grain. They will not thrive in the deeper parts of the substrate. They need high water flow because it brings them the oxygen and ammonia they need. This was the secret to under gravel filters: By improving the water flow through the substrate the bacteria could colonize more of the substrate, so a UGF was a pretty impressive bio-filter.
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Old 05-22-2013, 06:09 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Diana View Post
Fishless cycle:
1) Keep the ammonia at 3 ppm once a day, OR bring it only as high as 1 ppm, but do that twice a day.
REASON: Some plants do not like ammonia, and 1 ppm is all they can handle. The bacteria need to be fed in a way that represents the constant low level of ammonia that fish will produce. 3 ppm once a day will get used up by the bacteria and they will have a few hours with no food, and that is OK. 1 ppm twice a day is just about the same, as far as the bacteria are concerned, but safer for some plants.

2) Keep the nitrite under 5 ppm. These bacteria do not do too well when the nitrite rises too high. If you need to do water changes for high nitrite, then you might add less ammonia for a few days, until the nitrite removing bacteria catch up.

3) Plants and bacteria use many of the same nutrients. They will do this when the tank is fully running, too. So the short answer is Yes, having thriving plants will mean the bacteria population is smaller.
The more extended answer is that plants are also part of the bio filter. It does not matter whether the nitrogen is removed by bacteria or plants, as long as it is removed.
Having the plants well established and thriving when the fish are added is a very good way to make sure the plants are indeed doing well, and will handle the ammonia, CO2 and other things from fish, fish food and whatever else you add.

Substrate: Nitrifying bacteria live on all the surfaces in the tank. This includes the substrate. They do not live on the very top of each grain, these bacteria do not like the light. They will live on the under side of each grain. They will not thrive in the deeper parts of the substrate. They need high water flow because it brings them the oxygen and ammonia they need. This was the secret to under gravel filters: By improving the water flow through the substrate the bacteria could colonize more of the substrate, so a UGF was a pretty impressive bio-filter.
thanks , my cycle is almost over as of today. The nitrites are at 1.0 , and i been constantly dosing with ammonia. My subtrate is deep with sand, and has been providing great co2 to all my plants. The water wisteria has grown 3 inchs in 3 weeks. Can i start putting fish at 1.0? or should i just wait till 0
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Old 05-22-2013, 06:18 PM   #26
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My ammonia always hovers just above zero, like at .15, i'm guessing that's because the API test isn't that accurate. but in a cycled tank, i like to see ZERO nitrites - the api test pegs that perfect. nitrates were around 20ppm for me until i got some water wisteria and floating plants in there - now they are at 5ppm, which i'm comfortable with.

personally if either ammonia or nitrites were at 1ppm i'd wait on the fish. it's no fun to see gills all red due to ammonia or nitrite burn. that's what happened to me when i hit the tank with 10 new tetra all at once - ammonia spike, so nitrite spike, so burned gills, a few tetra dead.
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Old 05-22-2013, 06:34 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquarium hippy View Post
I never dose amonia I always let it run for a couple weeks then throw a golden wonder killi in there to help finish off the cycle they are tough as nails. Please dont grill me for my methods just how I cycle my new tanks. But I always throw some substrate from another tank in the bottom to help too
I won't grill you for your method, but I can't help mentioning that letting your tank just "run for a couple weeks" does hardly anything for the bacteria. Bacteria need a food source in order to grow. Whether one chooses to use live fish, fish food, or dose ammonia, there needs to be a source of ammonia to promote the growth of the bacterial colony. Simply letting your tank run is hardly doing anything for the nitrogen cycle.

OP: You've gotten some good advice so just stick with. You need to see Ammonia and Nitrite read 0 before you add fish. Otherwise you are likely to kill them and just end up wasting money. If your tank is heavily planted you may not see nitrates because they are consumed so fast but that is hardly an easy thing to predict because it depends on tank size, plant mass, co2 concentrations, and especially light.

Also, green water is typically caused by an ammonia spike rather than a bacterial bloom. Bacterial blooms are typically a cloudy white and they will right themselves out.
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Old 05-22-2013, 06:43 PM   #28
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I won't grill you for your method, but I can't help mentioning that letting your tank just "run for a couple weeks" does hardly anything for the bacteria. Bacteria need a food source in order to grow. Whether one chooses to use live fish, fish food, or dose ammonia, there needs to be a source of ammonia to promote the growth of the bacterial colony. Simply letting your tank run is hardly doing anything for the nitrogen cycle.

OP: You've gotten some good advice so just stick with. You need to see Ammonia and Nitrite read 0 before you add fish. Otherwise you are likely to kill them and just end up wasting money. If your tank is heavily planted you may not see nitrates because they are consumed so fast but that is hardly an easy thing to predict because it depends on tank size, plant mass, co2 concentrations, and especially light.

Also, green water is typically caused by an ammonia spike rather than a bacterial bloom. Bacterial blooms are typically a cloudy white and they will right themselves out.
gotcha i have a 25g btw 52 watts of light 6500k cfl diy fixture. My water was yellowish normal color i guess. its tough trying to be patient haha. My tank is actually heavily planted amazon sword,java fern, water wysteria, java moss, baby tears, and some other plants which i forgot the names. The nitrates are between 10-20ppm right now. Also i leave the lights on for 8 hours a day
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Old 05-22-2013, 09:16 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana View Post
Fishless cycle:
1) Keep the ammonia at 3 ppm once a day, OR bring it only as high as 1 ppm, but do that twice a day.
REASON: Some plants do not like ammonia, and 1 ppm is all they can handle. The bacteria need to be fed in a way that represents the constant low level of ammonia that fish will produce. 3 ppm once a day will get used up by the bacteria and they will have a few hours with no food, and that is OK. 1 ppm twice a day is just about the same, as far as the bacteria are concerned, but safer for some plants.

2) Keep the nitrite under 5 ppm. These bacteria do not do too well when the nitrite rises too high. If you need to do water changes for high nitrite, then you might add less ammonia for a few days, until the nitrite removing bacteria catch up.

3) Plants and bacteria use many of the same nutrients. They will do this when the tank is fully running, too. So the short answer is Yes, having thriving plants will mean the bacteria population is smaller.
The more extended answer is that plants are also part of the bio filter. It does not matter whether the nitrogen is removed by bacteria or plants, as long as it is removed.
Having the plants well established and thriving when the fish are added is a very good way to make sure the plants are indeed doing well, and will handle the ammonia, CO2 and other things from fish, fish food and whatever else you add.

Substrate: Nitrifying bacteria live on all the surfaces in the tank. This includes the substrate. They do not live on the very top of each grain, these bacteria do not like the light. They will live on the under side of each grain. They will not thrive in the deeper parts of the substrate. They need high water flow because it brings them the oxygen and ammonia they need. This was the secret to under gravel filters: By improving the water flow through the substrate the bacteria could colonize more of the substrate, so a UGF was a pretty impressive bio-filter.
I don't mean to hijack a thread but I've had off the charts nitrite levels for awhile. I'm 30 days in to my cycle and I've got both high nitrites and high nitrates. I've done two 50% water changes this week and my nitrite are still reading at 5+ ppm. I'm worried that if I do another WC it'll stall out what I already have going on. Thoughts?
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Old 05-23-2013, 02:58 AM   #30
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I don't mean to hijack a thread but I've had off the charts nitrite levels for awhile. I'm 30 days in to my cycle and I've got both high nitrites and high nitrates. I've done two 50% water changes this week and my nitrite are still reading at 5+ ppm. I'm worried that if I do another WC it'll stall out what I already have going on. Thoughts?
any plants? substrate?
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