Building a stand... Without power tools? - Page 2
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > Specific Aspects of a Planted Tank > DIY


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-26-2013, 07:26 PM   #16
Warlock
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
Warlock's Avatar
 
PTrader: (13/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Austin
Posts: 884
Default

I work at homedepot.. cuts are not always free.. depends on store policy, how good a mood the cutter is and if it requires lots of cuts of different sizes..

But it always is good to ask..

Ps.. u can also rent the power tools from hd.. 4 hr or 24 hr.. 4hr fee us pretty cheap compared to buying
Warlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-26-2013, 07:38 PM   #17
scapegoat
Planted Tank Guru
 
scapegoat's Avatar
 
PTrader: (14/100%)
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: philadelphia, pa
Posts: 2,190
Default

or do what i do... use it as an excuse to buy new/more tools
__________________
scapegoat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2013, 08:59 PM   #18
GraphicGr8s
Planted Tank Guru
 
GraphicGr8s's Avatar
 
PTrader: (10/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: West coast of the east coast of the USA.
Posts: 2,505
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Warlock View Post
I work at homedepot.. cuts are not always free.. depends on store policy, how good a mood the cutter is and if it requires lots of cuts of different sizes..

But it always is good to ask..

Ps.. u can also rent the power tools from hd.. 4 hr or 24 hr.. 4hr fee us pretty cheap compared to buying
Down here the first 2 are free. Then it's $0.25 per cut thereafter. And no precision cuts. Only time I ever really had them cut wood for me was when I got lazy and didn't feel like lugging a full sheet of 3/4 around and breaking it down. And one time I had them cut a bunch of 16 footers down to 14.
Why don't they sell 14' lumber anymore? Heck I looked at Lowes 14' and they were more than the 16s.
__________________
Quote me as saying I was misquoted.
Once you get rid of integrity the rest is a piece of cake.
Life is simple…People complicate it
Here's to our wives and sweethearts - may they never meet.
If you agreed with me we'd both be right.
GraphicGr8s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2013, 09:08 PM   #19
lochaber
Wannabe Guru
 
lochaber's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 1,987
Default

Back when I was in college, I built a couple stands with just hand tools. got some 2x4's from the local lumber yard, walked them back to my dorm, cut them with a cheap miter like Kado posted (except lower quality), and screwed them together using a leatherman (that was the worst part).

If you build the stand properly, the screws shouldn't really be structural- they mostly just keep things aligned, and clamp it together while the glue sets.

Most of your big-box stores will cut wood, some have a certain cuts/piece limitation, others charge a certain amount per cut, it really varies. I don't think I've ever gotten a really accurate cut, I usually just get bigger pieces chopped down so they are easier to carry.

I think doing without a drill might be the hardest part, but that's still doable. And drills are fairly common, so maybe you can see about borrowing one from a friend or something. It might also be worth checking out some flea markets and such, sometimes you can find some old beatup hand tools pretty cheap, and a hand drill would be a major help.
lochaber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2013, 02:10 AM   #20
Asphalt Art
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Coastal Georgia
Posts: 314
Default

When power is not the answer, go Amish. It is plenty strong to use a peg joint, as a barn holds a fair bit of weight. With modern wood glues and a properly chosen peg joint, you will not have any failure issues to speak of.

You can find these dirt cheap as flea markets too. Most people don't even know what they are.

Asphalt Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 07:39 PM   #21
GraphicGr8s
Planted Tank Guru
 
GraphicGr8s's Avatar
 
PTrader: (10/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: West coast of the east coast of the USA.
Posts: 2,505
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asphalt Art View Post
When power is not the answer, go Amish. It is plenty strong to use a peg joint, as a barn holds a fair bit of weight. With modern wood glues and a properly chosen peg joint, you will not have any failure issues to speak of.

You can find these dirt cheap as flea markets too. Most people don't even know what they are.

I use my Bit and Brace as a screwdriver when the battery needs charging. Swiped mine from my grandfather years ago.

You really need one of these though: ( I love mine)
Attached Images
 
__________________
Quote me as saying I was misquoted.
Once you get rid of integrity the rest is a piece of cake.
Life is simple…People complicate it
Here's to our wives and sweethearts - may they never meet.
If you agreed with me we'd both be right.
GraphicGr8s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2013, 08:20 PM   #22
Asphalt Art
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Coastal Georgia
Posts: 314
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraphicGr8s View Post
You really need one of these though: ( I love mine)
I think I have some of those precision hand drills around here somewhere. I probably lost them because I stopped using those new cheap Dewalts that gave me a fit (craptastic batteries) and I switched to Bosch 12V mini-drivers. The impact has over 950inlbs of torque and can drive a 3 inch screw through a 4x4 with a long enough WIHA bit.
Asphalt Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 02:56 AM   #23
mcclure91
Algae Grower
 
mcclure91's Avatar
 
PTrader: (1/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carrollton Illinois
Posts: 113
Default

if you want to make life easier and arent gonna be using power tools a ton check out harbor freight tools there cheap and get the job done not gonna last you forever but there are dirt cheap and work pretty dang good
mcclure91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 03:48 AM   #24
Asphalt Art
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Coastal Georgia
Posts: 314
Default

If you get the corded HF stuff it actually does last a while. I still have my 4.5" angle grinder from over 6 years ago, and I seriously abuse the snot out of it. I have yet to change the brushes (and you always get a spare set) probably due to losing them.

The battery powered stuff is where it gets hit and miss. Chargers fail often, and battery packs tend to lose capacity even when properly maintained in accordance with known practices (NiCd, Li-ion respectively).
Asphalt Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 01:34 PM   #25
DogFish
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (33/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Gone
Posts: 5,988
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mumford View Post
I love all these DIY stands, but is it possible to do without any power sanders, saws, etc?....
It seems not many here were poor students in the 70's

From my youth "hippie stand" ~ A standard concrete block is 16x8x8. Stacked 4 high your at 32" which is ave. stand height. HomeDepot sells Plywood in a 'Hobby Pannel size 2'x4' and 1/2 sheets of Plywood that are 4'x4' Home depot does 1 or 2 cuts free. Cut the plywood so you have a base & top. Set the base on the floor, stack your blocks add your top.....Done! No tools, power or hand needed.

Options - You can use additional plywood as shelves by laying them between the blocks. You can use a yoga mat as a gasket between the blocks. You can seal the plywood with, "Howard's Feed-n-Wax" from HomeDepot. I use it to refinish my gun stocks & grips. It's just Bee's was & Orange oil. You simple rub it on the wood with a rag. Again, NO tools needed.

Google image search "concrete block shelf" for further ideas.

Last edited by DogFish; 05-02-2013 at 12:40 PM.. Reason: sp
DogFish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 03:07 PM   #26
Soothing Shrimp
Planted Tank Guru
 
Soothing Shrimp's Avatar
 
PTrader: (131/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,606
Default

+1 Did that many'a'times in my younger days. Now that my youngest kids are 4 though, I have to wait a little while until that climbing everything phase is over with. LOL
__________________
RAOK Club and BBRR Club! My thinking has been invert-ed!
Soothing Shrimp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 08:34 PM   #27
the_deeb
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 204
Default

I've always lived in relatively small apartments and haven't had room for power tools and I've built 3 or 4 stands with just hand tools (with the exception of an electric drill). It takes patience and a little more effort and time but it's certainly possible to get nice results.

When I'm planning out the stand design I just try to account for the limitations of of my tools and resources and get HD/Lowes to make long cuts on plywood panels that I wouldn't be able to do myself. I use a lot of 1X4s and 1X3s in my construction because their a little easier to manage and cut by hand.

This stand was for a custom 90g wide and I built it primarily out of pine 1X4s. I made all the cuts myself with a cheap tenon saw and finished with a sanding block.



This one was for a 65g. I had Home Depot cut the birch plywood panels and cut and assembled the 1X4 supports myself:





This one was for my 300g paludarium and was built in a similar way






I'll be posting a build journal soon for my current ongoing project which is a disassembleable stand for my new 150g riparium, also built entirely with hand tools.
the_deeb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 08:42 PM   #28
Asphalt Art
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Coastal Georgia
Posts: 314
Default

Your fit and finish is very good considering your limitations the_deeb. Although you are only using smaller dimensional lumber it is easy to create thicker supports using sandwiched construction techniques.

I also give you some credit for keeping the grain situated. That alone makes it look more professional overall.
Asphalt Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 06:18 PM   #29
the_deeb
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (5/100%)
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 204
Default

Thanks. I definitely heavily employ sandwiched construction techniques in my build.

It seems relevant so thought I'd post a link to my build journal for my new knock-down stand which I'm also building using entirely hand tools:

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...d.php?t=325994
the_deeb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012