Anyone keep Mudskippers?
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:06 AM   #1
Scottyhorse
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Anyone keep Mudskippers?


Okay, I've got another thread on here. LOL Not exactly a newb, I mean, there's still lots to learn, but please put up with my random questions
I though mudskippers would be kind of neat to keep, I was thinking a group of six in something like this.
Not the $169 one though! Something along those lines.
I'll fill the bottom up with brackish water, sand, etc. I'll put some rocks in there from outside and some branchy driftwood, maybe bog wood for them to climb on.
Does this sound like a good set up? I'll have an internal filter for the water part. I'll be keeping indian dwarf mudskippers BTW. Any input from mudskipper keepers would be awesome
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:20 AM   #2
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Hi. I keep a species of mudskippers, the story of the setup is here.

The tank you linked would work great for a group. Six specimens need a large tank, these buggers are very territorial and stress easily. So if you get to choose, take less.
I keep 4 P. septemradiatus in a 140 gal tank, and wouldn't add any at the moment.

As to scaping the tank, I think they like it better to spend their time in shallow water, either pools or shoreline, than completely emersed from water. They do climb over and about any stones and driftwood, but spend most of their time fins wet, eyes emersed.
Makes it easy for them to gulp fresh, oxygenated water for breathing.

Very interesting fish, so go for it!
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:12 AM   #3
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Red face kinda long reply

I had some Dwarf Indian Muskippers for a year or so. They were adults when I got them, wild caught of course as they do not breed in captivity. I kept them in a 55 gallon aquarium, with sloping sand, baby mangroves at one end. I had a very shallow reptile feeding dish I tried to use, but they are super messy eaters and strung food all over the place. At first I was using a small internal filter, but I had constant issues with it clogging with sand, and it wasn't really adequate for them anyway, so I got a turtle tank filter (an external small canister designed for turtle tanks). It worked great. I had driftwood and rocks for them to climb on and hide around.
They were so entertaining to watch for the first few months. One was particularly dominant and aggressive and constantly outcompeted the others for food. In hindsight, I should have removed him to his own tank. He was so aggressive that eventually the others didn't try to feed until he was off gobbling the biggest hunk he could drag away (and fiercely defend). A couple mysteriously disappeared (I can only assume they died and were eaten), I found one dead of unknown causes some months ago, and the last two I found dead just a few days ago, one on one day, the other the next, again of unknown causes. Water params were decent and they had been eating every day until the first of the last two died. The last one didn't eat that day and was dead the next. Maybe they were just old, I don't know. Either way, they were really entertaining to watch, and would have been more so, I think, if I had removed the really aggressive one.

Advice I would give is to have a secure top, they can jump like you wouldn't belive! And I highly recommend the turtle filter over an internal one.
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:25 PM   #4
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I keep unfinding it in the mudskipper caresheets: these fish are about as territorial as Chameleos.
If they can see each other close by, they get very stressed and defensive of their grounds.
You want to keep more than one specimen in a tank, my advice would be: give them places to hang out with visual barriers to each other. And don't overcrowd the tank.

Mudskippers can take unbelievably bad water conditions and astonishing temp variations (see one nice documentary and it's there). But they hate being crowded. They fight. They get stressed. They die.
Considering the fact that these fish are so adaptive, it's a shame how short lifes they tend to live in our tanks.

Worth a try!
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:22 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HX67 View Post
Hi. I keep a species of mudskippers, the story of the setup is here.

The tank you linked would work great for a group. Six specimens need a large tank, these buggers are very territorial and stress easily. So if you get to choose, take less.
I keep 4 P. septemradiatus in a 140 gal tank, and wouldn't add any at the moment.

As to scaping the tank, I think they like it better to spend their time in shallow water, either pools or shoreline, than completely emersed from water. They do climb over and about any stones and driftwood, but spend most of their time fins wet, eyes emersed.
Makes it easy for them to gulp fresh, oxygenated water for breathing.

Very interesting fish, so go for it!
Wow, that is an amazing set up! I've been thinking about making some faux decor, but I don't think it would turn out so well! I'll have to look into it more.
I've been reading how territorial they are, I've never kept anything like that so it'll be a new thing for me..
They sure are cute little buggers, I think the trickiest thing for me will be figuring out the hard scape for their tank.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:25 PM   #6
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It all begins with the right scape and scape/specimen ratio, I think.

But it's rewarding when you make it work!
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:28 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lupine View Post
I had some Dwarf Indian Muskippers for a year or so. They were adults when I got them, wild caught of course as they do not breed in captivity. I kept them in a 55 gallon aquarium, with sloping sand, baby mangroves at one end. I had a very shallow reptile feeding dish I tried to use, but they are super messy eaters and strung food all over the place. At first I was using a small internal filter, but I had constant issues with it clogging with sand, and it wasn't really adequate for them anyway, so I got a turtle tank filter (an external small canister designed for turtle tanks). It worked great. I had driftwood and rocks for them to climb on and hide around.
They were so entertaining to watch for the first few months. One was particularly dominant and aggressive and constantly outcompeted the others for food. In hindsight, I should have removed him to his own tank. He was so aggressive that eventually the others didn't try to feed until he was off gobbling the biggest hunk he could drag away (and fiercely defend). A couple mysteriously disappeared (I can only assume they died and were eaten), I found one dead of unknown causes some months ago, and the last two I found dead just a few days ago, one on one day, the other the next, again of unknown causes. Water params were decent and they had been eating every day until the first of the last two died. The last one didn't eat that day and was dead the next. Maybe they were just old, I don't know. Either way, they were really entertaining to watch, and would have been more so, I think, if I had removed the really aggressive one.

Advice I would give is to have a secure top, they can jump like you wouldn't belive! And I highly recommend the turtle filter over an internal one.
Thanks so much for the advice. I should have thought of the turtle filter, I was worried about sand getting clogged in there.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:34 PM   #8
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It all begins with the right scape and scape/specimen ratio, I think.

But it's rewarding when you make it work!
Yeah, I bet it is! I've got a question for you. The only place that I have found who sells indian dwarf's sells them in groups of 6. They are juveniles so they can't be sexed. Do you have an opinion on a footprint of a tank I should be looking for? I'm interested in something like I linked to, but I will buy what ever would work best as long as it doesn't cost me an arm and a leg!
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:51 PM   #9
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Tough call.
Would you be able to split the order in half with someone...?

I'm keeping 4 (3males, 1 female) mudskippers in a footprint of 5'5" x 2'.
P. septemradiatus is a bit bigger than the indian mudskipper (P. novemradiatus, I gather?) and I would think that they settle for a bit smaller territories than the ones I have.

To be honest, I'd just say get a tank as big as you can, make the scape variable, give every specimen you've got a place to have a rest without constant stress and you're there.
Males establish a steady territory, females seem to move around more.

Have a spare tank in case it doesn't look good, perhaps, and sell anything you have a hard time housing?

I'm sure you won't go with the 10 gal/6skippers route so many seem to be going, that breaks my heart.

Congrats for figuring these things out in advance, dude!
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:16 PM   #10
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Tough call.
Would you be able to split the order in half with someone...?

I'm keeping 4 (3males, 1 female) mudskippers in a footprint of 5'5" x 2'.
P. septemradiatus is a bit bigger than the indian mudskipper (P. novemradiatus, I gather?) and I would think that they settle for a bit smaller territories than the ones I have.

To be honest, I'd just say get a tank as big as you can, make the scape variable, give every specimen you've got a place to have a rest without constant stress and you're there.
Males estblish a steady territory, females seem to move around more.

Have a spare tank in case it doesn't look good, perhaps, and sell anything you have a hard time housing?

I'm sure you won't go with the 10 gal/6skippers route so many seem to be going, that breaks my heart.

Congrats for figuring these things out in advance, dude!

Oh, looky here, I can buy them $7 each instead of 6 at a time. Cool!
I'll try and get the largest tank I can, but I've got to keep in mind I've got to keep this low budget, which is going to be hard, these guys are so cool!
I'll try and look for a long tank, since it would have a larger foot print.
I wish I could keep a bunch in a ten gal, but I wouldn't ever do that. Bad for the little skippers.
Maybe something like 24" L X 18" W X 18" H for 3 or 4?
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:34 PM   #11
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I'd stretch the length out a bit more, but if you can make some sort of elevation in the scape, the dimensions might work for 3-4.

I can't emphasize enough that if you manage to scape your tank to hold habitable pools or "territories" that are divided from each other, horizontally or vertically, you can habit skippers accordingly.
My opinion.

My tank is constructed with 12 separate pools and at any given time, aggression arousing, there's a place an individual fish finds a place to escape and rest. I am very happy with the setup.
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:44 PM   #12
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Yeah, your setup is amazing! I'll search around, see what I can find. See what I can save up, too! I'll try and shoot for 2 pools for each. I wonder if it would just be cheaper to buy some glass and silicone the tank myself. That way I can get the dimensions I want... Hmmm...
Maybe something like 36" long, 18" wide, and 18" inches tall or so. Then maybe I can get some glass scraps to make ledges for pools, and then do DIY rock work and stuff around the edges.
I think that would look pretty cool. Then maybe I can have some bumble bee gobies in the tank part, I've always wanted some of those.
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:51 PM   #13
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In a way it might save a couple of bucks for you.
Making an aquarium from scratch by getting the glass cut to size is not cost-efficient, I think. At least where I'm residing, it tends to be more expensive.
But since you can use thinner glass with a tank not filled with water to the top, you might save some.

I've got BBGs with my mudskippers, they rock!
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:07 PM   #14
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A while ago I was thinking of setting up a 12G long tank for the gobies, but I didn't. If I could keep these two together it would be awesome. Although, I might die from the cuteness of their faces! LOL
I'll just look around at terrariums, and see if I can find one the right size.
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:25 PM   #15
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I found a few terrariums that might work. Here, here, here, and here
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