Oak Tank Stand on Concret Floor
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Old 02-23-2013, 03:17 AM   #1
inkslinger
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Oak Tank Stand on Concret Floor


Was thinking of using pressure treated 2x4 frame lay down flat so use only the 2" side, but how to secure it together .
Do I cut 45`on the ends?
Do I just square of at the ends and use 1 or 2 lag boats?
The stand is made of Oak and is 36" tall , 18"x60" for a 110g tank , It is a lot of weight and did not want it to fall apart when fill with water.
The tank is in my unfinished basement. Any ideas.
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Old 02-23-2013, 10:01 PM   #2
Diana
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If I understand your question you are looking for some way to keep the Oak stand off the floor, perhaps in case of a wet floor?

You do not even have to attach the 2 x 4 to each other. Lay them down flat (the 4" side lays on the floor, the stand will be lifted 2" higher) where the Oak stand touches the floor, then VERY CAREFULLY set the stand on the 2 x 4s without moving the 2 x 4s. You can even put plastic or wood shims in there if the floor is not level.

If you want it to be higher, you can stand the 2 x 4s on edge. When I do this I cut the 2 x 4s square, then screw them together to make a box. No mitered corners. In a basement, who cares for perfect cabinetry techniques? If you want it to look pretty good, then make the front board as long as the stand, and set the end boards inside where you won't see their cut ends. I do this to make stands for 45 gallon tanks, 4' long. It would work just fine for a 75 gallon tank when used in this way.

This will not stop the Oak stand from getting wet, if that is your goal. The wood 2 x 4s will wick water up from the floor.
If you want to prevent this you need to use some kind of water proofing. For example, set up the 2 x 4s to lift the stand off the floor, then put pond line over them. That way, any water that is wicked into the 2 x 4 from the floor cannot pass into the Oak stand. Note however, that if water falls to the bottom of the stand it will be held by the pond liner, not allowed to flow away. So this is a 2-edged sword: It can help if the floor is often damp, but can be a problem if you spill water from the aquarium.

In the green house where I keep a lot of tanks I have some up on concrete blocks. This also can wick the water up from the floor, but does not seem to cause problems so far.
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:21 AM   #3
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A woodworker would join two 2x4s at right angles with a variety of joints.

The 45 degree miter joint idea is weak and tough to get just right; I would dismiss it.

A half lap joint is fairly easy to execute and if the joint is well done with smooth flat surfaces touching, glue can give it lots of strength. A nail or screw can also pin it together; I would pre-drill for the pin so the wood does not split. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lap_joint

Superior to a half lap are finger joints or mortise and tenon. Both are probably beyond a non-woodworker's skills and this situation's needs.

House carpenters frequently butt join 2x4s and simply nail them together. The nail (or lag screw you suggest) does not really grip the second piece very well, but this application will have no stresses in that direction and you should be all right (which is why Diana's suggestion of not attaching the two boards at all is not too far off).
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:17 PM   #4
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I just wanted to keep the Oak Stand off the concrete floor, since pressure treated wood is use in the same matter when building walls in a basement or when wood has to touch concrete. I guess when just lay it down it's not going to move with all the weight.
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:53 AM   #5
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maybe look at just putting down a bit of pvc shower liner, or maybe some of the composite decking, or maybe some flat paver stones.

Does your basement just get damp/wet, or do you end up sloshing around in ankle-deep water after a rain?
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:58 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lochaber View Post
maybe look at just putting down a bit of pvc shower liner, or maybe some of the composite decking, or maybe some flat paver stones.

....



That would be my plan. Pavers or Bricks, a sheet of 3/4" plywood then a water barrier so water would wick up through the plywood. Shimming to level could be done between the brick & plywood.
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inkslinger View Post
I just wanted to keep the Oak Stand off the concrete floor, since pressure treated wood is use in the same matter when building walls in a basement or when wood has to touch concrete. I guess when just lay it down it's not going to move with all the weight.
They use PT because it is intimate, permanent contact with concrete. Also note that in most cases the PT is "encased" in drywall. It is perfectly fine to put the oak stand right on the floor and in fact PT is not needed nor is it desirable in this instance. You would be better off putting down a few good coats of poly on the end grain rather than using any PT lumber.
If it is a damp floor you'd do better to use PVC trim instead of PT and you could glue the trim together with pvc cement.
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:56 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inkslinger View Post
or when wood has to touch concrete.
I don't know about down there, but up here when we have wood on concrete we seperate the two with a strip of polyethylene foam. Which is what I would use in this case if the floor is damp. If the floor has standing water, then I would use cement blocks and polyethylene foam.


http://www.homedepot.ca/product/foam...-x-3-16/905955

The link is for a sill gasket but I have used this material between the foundation and the walls of a two story house before so don't fret yourself over the weight of your fishtank crushing it and causing it to fail. It won't.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:05 AM   #9
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This a brand new house just build {2 month old} We had a lot of rain and the land around the house has not been loam and seeded yet, so there is a lot of water puddles around the house ,we have no leaks for now but keeping a close eye.
Will start to work on the basement this summer by laying down some 4x4 sub flooring that Home Depot and Lowes sells , it has a moister barrier on one side and did not think it would hold a large tank with a lot of water . Might try the composite decking
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