low-tech planted shrimp tank? - Page 2
Planted Tank Forums
Your Tanks Image Hosting *Tank Tracker * Plant Profiles Fish Profiles Planted Tank Guide Photo Gallery Articles

Go Back   The Planted Tank Forum > Specific Aspects of a Planted Tank > Shrimp & Other Invertebrates


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-17-2013, 02:13 AM   #16
madness
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (14/100%)
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,698
Default

I didn't mean that the AC50 is easier to maintain than the AC30, for example.

I just find it convenient to have my multiple filters the same size/model when possible so switching out tubes/media/etc. is more convenient. It wouldn't really apply to what you have planned.
madness is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-17-2013, 02:22 AM   #17
CookieM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 790
Default

So let sum it up. You have a 10 gal tank and want to go low tech.

1. AquaClear HOB filter 20-30
2. Aquasoil is expensive for a low tech tank. Go for Black Sand or common earth gravel.
3. Since you did say you like Cherry and other Neos, best not to use active soil because it lower PH. Neos do best at PH above 7 (8 for Yellow).
4. Lightning is easy you can go T5 or LED, don't need to get fancy brand like Finnex or Ray2 unless you plant to heavily planted the tank with high requirement plants.

I remember when I started my first low tech tank with RCS. Sponge filter and using 2 fluorescent daylight bulb from any general store. They breed like crazy and low tech plants are growing fast.
CookieM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2013, 03:42 AM   #18
naturelady
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 202
Default

madness- thanks for the clarification!

Cookie- thanks for the tip on optimal pH for neos. I hadn't actually looked into the optimal parameters for these shrimp yet, but you are correct, aquasoil would not be ideal.

I actually have a professional water test on my tap water.
pH - 7.7
TDS - 421
Ca carbonate - 301 (translates to KH approx 17)
Mg - 14 (Ca carbonate + Mg = GH approx 18, its really slightly higher because I haven't added in S, Cl, and whatever else belongs in there)

So not too bad for cherry shrimp... Here's the problem though, nitrates are 11 ppm. Are those safe? I do have an RO system, so I can dilute with that, or just go straight RO and remineralize.

As far as lighting, the Finnex Fugeray is the cheapest LED I've seen for the light output and size tank I'm getting. I definitely want LED. I'm tired of buying bulbs and I like the sleek look.
naturelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2013, 03:57 AM   #19
CookieM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 790
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by naturelady View Post
madness- thanks for the clarification!

Cookie- thanks for the tip on optimal pH for neos. I hadn't actually looked into the optimal parameters for these shrimp yet, but you are correct, aquasoil would not be ideal.

I actually have a professional water test on my tap water.
pH - 7.7
TDS - 421
Ca carbonate - 301 (translates to KH approx 17)
Mg - 14 (Ca carbonate + Mg = GH approx 18, its really slightly higher because I haven't added in S, Cl, and whatever else belongs in there)

So not too bad for cherry shrimp... Here's the problem though, nitrates are 11 ppm. Are those safe? I do have an RO system, so I can dilute with that, or just go straight RO and remineralize.

As far as lighting, the Finnex Fugeray is the cheapest LED I've seen for the light output and size tank I'm getting. I definitely want LED. I'm tired of buying bulbs and I like the sleek look.
Finnex cost at least $40 for a 10 inch length.

While ... http://www.aquatraders.com/LED-Brigh...ed-p/56270.htm

Is what I'm using. Regardless of people who bash this brand I have 3 of them and they still working for me over a year. Not a single dead bulb.

Reduce nitrate is most effective is by doing water change. RO + Mineral drop is what I use.

I encourage using a HOB filter for filter media and having Carbon and or with Purigen to have a desire water parameter.
CookieM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2013, 04:08 AM   #20
naturelady
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 202
Default

Thanks for the tip on the other brand of LED. I hadn't seen Beamswork brand before. Do you know of any PAR data available anywhere on that light? I am just curious because of the different shape (lots of LEDs concentrated in the middle of the tank rather than stretched across the length of the tank).

I think you might have missed what I said about the water- the nitrates are in my tap water. But diluting the tap water with RO should be equivalent to doing the water change that you suggested for an established tank. Most people generally do 50% WCs anyhow.

What is the level of nitrates that shrimp can handle, anyhow? If you keep nitrates at 0, then you can't grow plants in the tank, so there must be a balance somewhere...

I just got Purigen for my main tank. I like it so far. Probably will use it on the new tank too. Right now my plan is to use a HOB filter (Aquaclear). That could change, but... probably not. It sounds like it will work, and that's all I need.
naturelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2013, 05:23 AM   #21
CookieM
Planted Tank Enthusiast
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 790
Default

Oh sorry I misread your thread. I always use 100% RO water for all my tanks and add in minerals.

And sorry I don't have the spectrum for Beamswork brand since they're not as popular as other brands in the USA. For what it worth I enjoy the light on all my tanks and I think for 12" height or below tank is best.
CookieM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2013, 11:59 AM   #22
somewhatshocked
Obsessed? Maybe
 
somewhatshocked's Avatar
 
PTrader: (427/100%)
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,356
Default

Remember the old adage: you get what you pay for.

I have BeamsWork fixtures on more shallow low-tech tanks but in this instance, spending the few extra bucks on a Fugeray will be worth it. The why: you have more flexibility in terms of lighting levels and types of plants you can grow and you'll actually receive customer service from someone you can speak to right here on the forum.

Aquasoil is not expensive for a small tank, contrary to web mythology. 9L costs $30. And you end up with a nutrient-filled substrate that contains enough ammonia to get your tank cycled (meaning you don't have to add it) and you get buffering power, which is good for shrimp because it creates stability.

If it were me and I had to make a decision between spending $5-$10 on sand and $30 on Aquasoil or a similar active substrate? I'd go with the high-end stuff because it's worth it. Especially in a small tank.

Neos are fine, typically, in a range of pH points and levels of hardness. It's just popular opinion when people tell you exactly what your tank parameters will be.
somewhatshocked is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Planted Tank LLC 2012