Alternative fertilization strategy
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:27 PM   #1
spidangular
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Alternative fertilization strategy


Problem: My plants suffer deficiencies.

Background info: I'm new to aquatic plants. I have high light, DIY CO2, use Eco complete, and was given dry ferts PNK and Plantex, as well as a dilluted aquaponic plant fertilizer (http://selectaquatics.com/Plant%20Fertilizer.htm) touted by Greg Sage (1 six ounce bottle doses like 44,000 gallons of water). Any I have micros. While there may be no excuse for it (laziness, probably) my plants don't look so great due to deficiencies. I have my nice planted tank in the living area.

Solution: place plants in a low-to-no-light, HIGHLY fertilized tank (imagine a hold tank in the basement) when they don't look so good. After a few days (or however long, TBD) they should absorb enough nutrients to color up, straighten up, or otherwise cure what ails them. Once they look all right, I can move them back into my other tank. There will be no CO2, and hopefully not enough light for algae problems (only light from the room). If there is algae, I can scrape it off the glass. If it's on the plants, I can stick them in my community tank and those fish can clean it up before I add it to my nicer display tank. The tank will have a HOB filter and a heater. I am aware I can't cure deficiencies related to minerals/nutrients that are only transported during new growth.

Besides the obvious "Why don't you just figure out how to dose your tank right, so your plants are green and you don't have algae", any comments, suggestions, or previous experience?
Thanks!
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:40 PM   #2
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The trauma of the plants moving around might outweigh the beneifts. It seems to me that every time I pull up a plant then replant it, it sort of stunts for a while and takes a long time to recover.

Interesting idea, though
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Old 02-15-2013, 12:34 AM   #3
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build an inexpensive dosing pump and forget about dosing for months at a time

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...419&highlight=

Im about to "upgrade" my fert bottle from 1700ml to a 1 gallon jug (~3780ml --> 6months of 0 effort dosing from 15mins of work making a dosing solution)

...sounds easier than setting up another tank...uprooting plants...buying equipment...then replanting

just a suggestion
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Old 07-09-2013, 04:43 AM   #4
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check these threads out for inspiration for low tech low maintenance tanks:
low tech
low tech non co2
El Natural
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Old 07-09-2013, 12:56 PM   #5
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I don't think this is a great idea. Plants, like much life, prefer stable conditions. What you're proposing is to let the plants recover, at which point they'll only take on nutrients that they can use, then once you remove them from the nutrient-rich environment, they will begin to suffer fairly quickly.
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Old 07-09-2013, 05:20 PM   #6
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If your "recovery" tank has low to no light, the plants will not recover at all. They will just die. Plants need light to grow, and they need a certain minimum amount of light. The light is what drives the plants growth rate. With no light, there is no growth. With low light, there is slow growth. With high light, there is fast growth. Whichever growth rate the light drives the plants to has to be supported by fertilizing to meet the needs of the plants at that growth rate. At more than low light, the plants are usually limited in growth by a lack of CO2, not fertilizers. The only thing you can do in excess to help the plants in a no-fish tank is add lots of CO2, but you still need adequate light even then.
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Old 07-10-2013, 01:49 AM   #7
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Here some tanks with no fauna. Homer_Simpson has done a few experiments with low maintenance tanks without fauna

If your tap water ph is high and gh low the city has treated the water with phosphates.
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:29 PM   #8
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Invest in pressurized co2. Its always co2. Then ferts. Try raising the high light fixture about a foot?
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Old 07-11-2013, 04:03 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoppy View Post
If your "recovery" tank has low to no light, the plants will not recover at all. They will just die. Plants need light to grow, and they need a certain minimum amount of light. The light is what drives the plants growth rate. With no light, there is no growth. With low light, there is slow growth. With high light, there is fast growth. Whichever growth rate the light drives the plants to has to be supported by fertilizing to meet the needs of the plants at that growth rate. At more than low light, the plants are usually limited in growth by a lack of CO2, not fertilizers. The only thing you can do in excess to help the plants in a no-fish tank is add lots of CO2, but you still need adequate light even then.
+1

Most folks do NOT have fert issues, they have light and CO2 issues.
They also will not take up near as much nutrients if they lack light/CO2.

So...............

Read this and once you understand Liebig's law and the article, I think you should be able to figure out why.

http://www.tropica.com/en/tropica-ab...and-light.aspx
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