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Old 06-10-2012, 03:54 AM   #1
theblondskeleton
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Default The 120-P Reader - Pictures Included (56KWarning)

A little background, first. Iíve been a member for a while, but out of the loop for about a year.

I have been a planted tank hobbyist for around 4-5 years. I have made some truly horrific planted monstrosities. I didnít keep the pictures of all the bad ones for, well, obvious reasons, but I kept some. Remember that I said these are the ones I didnít toss out, hahaÖ

I had always been fascinated with the iwagumi style. I particularly value the wabi-sabi aesthetic it demonstrates Ė and really thatís what draws me to Mr. Amanoís work and Japanese style gardens in general. My own work as a theatre director follows this same transient, imperfect ideal, and I have always been drawn to art and expression that reveals frailty, character, uniqueness, organic origin and development, etc, particularly as it represents isolation and flawed beauty.

While I am only a doe-eyed novice yet, I always strive toward this sense of wabi-sabi Ė with little success, I admit Ė in my layouts. The areas I need the most experience and practice in are plant selection and trimming techniques.

Iíve spent a lot of time lately on the ADA View YouTube channel, and really it couldnít have happened at a better time. These videos have been invaluable to me. Seeing these scapes planted for seminars, and then trimmed and grown in - seeing their development over time - awesome.

We donít have an active club in my area, and the members around Portland are not terribly active as a community, so we have little opportunity to share plants, techniques, and tips with one another. This has been a good substitute so far.

A quick retrospective of my previous work. I do this for context. Go ahead and skip, if you want the build begins later. But, If you like a good, old-fashioned house of horrors, or a nice freak show, perhaps the type you'd rather not admit you love to see, then please by all means share in my past failures!

An early attempt:



Things I got right: CO2 and Light
Things I didnít: Ferts, substrate, layout, trimming, and plant choice

I wanted to represent an area much like my home. High desert. Tonina sp. ďLago GrandeĒ was a poor choice, here. The other plants grew ok, though.

Another:



Things I got right: Layout, substrate, CO2, Light
Things I didnít: Ferts, trimming and layout material

UghÖ why am I sharing this? Well, I think itís important to remember where Iíve been, so that I can see how far Iíve come. Plus, itís kind of cathartic to relive some of these horrors, hahaÖ

My first collectoritis tank:



Things I got right: light, ferts, heavily planted
Things I didnít: CO2 (neither stable nor well distributed), substrate, layout, gassed my fish ☹

This was my first 90-gallon scape. Perfect footprint, but the height was a LOT to deal with. I couldnít get the proportions to look right. I couldnít tolerate the complete chaos, either. I enjoy engineered chaos. My job is a lot like that.

My first (sort-of) success:



Things I got right: Light, CO2, diffusion, ferts, heavily planted, substrate, layout
Things I didnít: trimming

That was my 90-gallon from a few years back. I had a chance to practice some trimming techniques and grew a pretty awesome HC carpet. I never trimmed the carpet though, so it eventually uprooted when it reached about 2Ē thick. The plants grew so quickly that I couldnít keep up with them. 6xT5HO plus reactor diffusion and PPS classic dosing was a very high-growth combination!

The next version of the 90-gallon:



Lace rock and Manzanita. Kind of a tough scape to maintain with the sand. Eventually, my routine broke down, and I ceased to be productive scape-wise. I still really wanted an iwagumi scape. So, I built a few nanos to try my hand at stone layouts.





And then, back to the 90 for some wacky stone scapes:







That one was more like an aquarium clown-car: How much hardscape can I cram into a 90-gallon glass box?

Others:













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