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-   -   Please comment on my hardscape (http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=90395)

stevenlau 07-13-2009 05:20 PM

Please comment on my hardscape
 
Hello, this is my 3rd rescape and this time I intend to use some petrified wood stone but I find it hard to acquire the good looking one. So, this is my scape, it's not a beautiful, unique or fancy stone but I want to make the best out of it, please folks help me.

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/j...Hardscape2.jpg

The layout will be the triangular theme and sloping from left to right using major stem plants and foreground will be HC. What do you guys think? The substrate will be added a couples cm height. Sorry for the picture I've taken using a cell phone camera. Any input will be appreciated.

Strick 07-13-2009 07:02 PM

Love the stone, but more of it would be better. Or bigger pieces.

stevenlau 07-13-2009 07:53 PM

It's sad but that's all I've got...help me with the scape :redface:

screename 07-13-2009 08:07 PM

I agree. its REALLY small. After planting, Im afraid your scape will be lost quickly.

Borgie 07-13-2009 08:36 PM

Would look nice if you're going iwagumi. Was at aquaforest in SF last week, fell in love with one of their iwagumi tanks that had glosso as a foreground. How tall are the rocks? how big is the tank?

stevenlau 07-13-2009 08:52 PM

my tank is 80x30x40cm and the highest rock is about 14cm...

SPECIAL||PLANS 07-13-2009 10:40 PM

slope the substrate and use those as ledging rocks :P

malaybiswas 07-14-2009 04:51 AM

You definitely need some more substrate and slope. The layout is too flat and there's a lot of empty space on the top. I would think that the substrate height at the back should be around 1/3rd of the tank height and 1/4 or 1/5 at the front to strike a balance.

The rocks are too small compared to size of the tank so the slope can compensate it and extend the rocks close to the center (vertically) of the tank (typical viewing angle).

#2 spacing the clusters a little further will tie in along the length of the tank and placing a couple of the smaller pieces between the clusters will maintain the flow of the hardscape.

Lastly, FG should be very low growing plants like UG or HC. Some grassy plants like blyxa, sagittaria, hairgrass etc. on the background (around the rocks) will blend the hardscape more evenly with the flora.

This is my first cut opinion looking at your setup. Hope it helps :)

stevenlau 07-14-2009 05:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by malaybiswas (Post 877565)
You definitely need some more substrate and slope. The layout is too flat and there's a lot of empty space on the top. I would think that the substrate height at the back should be around 1/3rd of the tank height and 1/4 or 1/5 at the front to strike a balance.

The rocks are too small compared to size of the tank so the slope can compensate it and extend the rocks close to the center (vertically) of the tank (typical viewing angle).

#2 spacing the clusters a little further will tie in along the length of the tank and placing a couple of the smaller pieces between the clusters will maintain the flow of the hardscape.

Lastly, FG should be very low growing plants like UG or HC. Some grassy plants like blyxa, sagittaria, hairgrass etc. on the background (around the rocks) will blend the hardscape more evenly with the flora.

This is my first cut opinion looking at your setup. Hope it helps :)

Thanks for your opinion, I'll add some substrate later to form a slope since I'll re-use my mix substrates of JBL aquabasis, Sera floredepot, ADA normal and powder, I can't put them all together now 'cause too afraid that the lowest JBL and Sera will mixed up to the top layer and will cloud the water then. Hope you understand my english :smile:. This is my rough scape and ask for opinion regarding the rocks shape and formation.

My FG will be HC for sure and the setup layout will be triangular type sloping from left to right using major stem plants.

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/j...a/Image011.jpg

My setup will be like this one
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/j...ascaping_4.jpg

Ok, I've slope the back a bit but haven't put all of my substrate as I've explain at the above, so please folks, let's imagine a bit, OK? :smile: Also I've moved closer to center as you said, malaybiswas. Now, what do you think? Thank you.

blair 07-14-2009 01:17 PM

I haven't read through all of this as I need to run, but I your best bet with stones like that and a scape with stems might be to do a sand foreground. This way you can keep the foreground very low, exposing the petrified woods, and start the planting behind it. Basically, using it like Amano would yamaya stone (as a border). Just a thought as these are very small. Best of luck :)

stevenlau 07-14-2009 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blair (Post 877652)
I haven't read through all of this as I need to run, but I your best bet with stones like that and a scape with stems might be to do a sand foreground. This way you can keep the foreground very low, exposing the petrified woods, and start the planting behind it. Basically, using it like Amano would yamata stone (as a border). Just a thought as these are very small. Best of luck :)

You just sound exactly 100% like what I've thought about the layout. Would you be very kindly to give me link about Amano's Yamata scape? Thank you. Now, what about the rocks formation? Do they look any good to you? Should move them a bit back or forth or sideway? Thank you once again.

DorianBrytestar 07-14-2009 02:23 PM

You could pick up some light colored slate or something to pick the petrified wood up a bit.

Assume that you will lose the bottom inch of whatever you put in to plants, putting the slate or other rock under the petrified wood and raise it vertically. (May want to raise the left side more to match the incoming flora growth.)

stevenlau 07-14-2009 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DorianBrytestar (Post 877676)
You could pick up some light colored slate or something to pick the petrified wood up a bit.

Assume that you will lose the bottom inch of whatever you put in to plants, putting the slate or other rock under the petrified wood and raise it vertically. (May want to raise the left side more to match the incoming flora growth.)

Hmmm....I think I'll try to find something to raise them up a bit. Thank you. What about a Styrofoam? Will it works?

blair 07-15-2009 02:13 AM

Stevenlau, I have struggled to find the example of Yamaya stone that I remember seeing before. Regardless I was able to track down this image which hopefully presents the idea a little bit... [Click Here for Image]

The stones are used as a border for the sand bed. They merely separate the plants and soil from mixing with the sand bed as well serving to obscure the transition between the two soil types. To separate them, place a poster board cut to size (or some sturdy edging device) in the tank. Place a few of the rocks on the back side to keep it in place as you slowly pour the sand in. Once filled partially, start to add the soil to the back side. Then fill them both to the top as desired. Remove the stones slowly before fully covered and lightly place them on top of the edge, when filled, to obscure it.

I usually focus on iwagumi so this is a bit outside my norm. Hope it helps :)

stevenlau 07-15-2009 05:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blair (Post 878005)
Stevenlau, I have struggled to find the example of Yamaya stone that I remember seeing before. Regardless I was able to track down this image which hopefully presents the idea a little bit... [Click Here for Image]

The stones are used as a border for the sand bed. They merely separate the plants and soil from mixing with the sand bed as well serving to obscure the transition between the two soil types. To separate them, place a poster board cut to size (or some sturdy edging device) in the tank. Place a few of the rocks on the back side to keep it in place as you slowly pour the sand in. Once filled partially, start to add the soil to the back side. Then fill them both to the top as desired. Remove the stones slowly before fully covered and lightly place them on top of the edge, when filled, to obscure it.

I usually focus on iwagumi so this is a bit outside my norm. Hope it helps :)

Thank you, but I don't use sand, instead I just use soil and the use of rocks in my tank are just merely for decorative purposes. The problem is only those kind of rocks that I can find so hard, so I will work my very best to make them look good.


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