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-   -   Carnivorous Plants Riparium Style? (http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=199177)

Acro 12-03-2012 02:28 AM

Carnivorous Plants Riparium Style?
 
Has anyone tried (and had luck) growing Carnivorour Plants in Riparium planters? There seem to be a decent ammount of fish that live in acidic water.

Crispino L Ramos 12-03-2012 03:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acro (Post 2097323)
Has anyone tried (and had luck) growing Carnivorour Plants in Riparium planters? There seem to be a decent ammount of fish that live in acidic water.

Send n_seine a PM, he grows carnivorous plants emersed. http://www.bamaplants.com/

AirstoND 12-05-2012 10:11 PM

I've been contemplating this but will only try it on my tropical sundews and pinguiculas (that multiply like crazy) with a high light setup. I suspect the venus flytraps and pitcher plants are very sensitive to dissolved solids and nitrates from fish water.

hydrophyte 12-06-2012 04:39 PM

This might work with blackwater fish.

I have found that the best riparium selections are plants that grow pretty fast with lots of foliage to fill in. Most carnivorous plants are pretty spindly--they don't need as much leaf area for making food--so it might be more difficult to get them to look good in a riparium planting. Nevertheless, this could be a nice way to keep a few carnivorous plants in a display with fish.

I suppose you would just want to fill the planter cup with sphagnum moss and maybe something else a little more dense, such as hydroton, to hold the plants in place.

Acro 12-06-2012 09:34 PM

There are several bog plants (ferns, mosses, grasses and cranberry) that could be used inbetween carnivorous plants to fill in the gaps.

As for under the water, the book "The Complete Aquarium" by Peter W. Scott shows how to setup amazing biotope aquariums and lists several good fish and aquatic plants for acid waters.
Useful biotopes listed in the book include Amazon Rain Forest Acid Pool, West African Floodplain Swamp, and the Amazon Rain Forest Stream. Each of those has a full listing of aquatic plants and fish that live in acid water.
So choosing the right carnivorous plants, aquatic plants and fish, one could make a Carnivorous Acid Water Community Riparium!

Oh boy...I don't know if I have room for another tank!

hydrophyte 12-07-2012 04:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acro (Post 2101678)
There are several bog plants (ferns, mosses, grasses and cranberry) that could be used inbetween carnivorous plants to fill in the gaps.

As for under the water, the book "The Complete Aquarium" by Peter W. Scott shows how to setup amazing biotope aquariums and lists several good fish and aquatic plants for acid waters.
Useful biotopes listed in the book include Amazon Rain Forest Acid Pool, West African Floodplain Swamp, and the Amazon Rain Forest Stream. Each of those has a full listing of aquatic plants and fish that live in acid water.
So choosing the right carnivorous plants, aquatic plants and fish, one could make a Carnivorous Acid Water Community Riparium!

Oh boy...I don't know if I have room for another tank!

Do you know anything specific about tropical carnivorous plants that live in very wet boggy situations? Most of the most obvious choices that I can think of are more like warm temperate plants and I have heard that those species of carnivorous plants require a cool winter rest, which doesn't work very well with an indoors setup.

hydrophyte 12-07-2012 04:21 AM

Look at this thread...

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...51#post2101751

There are some great pictures in there.

Acro 12-19-2012 08:36 AM

With a quick look into the book: The Curious World Of Carnivorous Plants" byWilhelm Barthlott, Stefan Porembski, Rudiger Seine, and Inge Theisen. I was able to find the Asian Pitcher Plant Family (Nepenthes). The lowland swamp inhabitants should work, I don't think they sleep half the year. There have to be others as well.

Even for species that take a rest, they would be living 6 months of the year for the riparium keeper to enjoy. The background plants (ferns, mosses, grasses and cranberry) could take centerstage during the winter.

I think this is a very doable project.
Wish I currently had the tank space.

Wy Renegade 12-19-2012 02:14 PM

Generally from what I've found, a mix of dried moss and sand is recommended to sustain the carnivorous plants.

The problem with those that need a rest is the fact that they have to be removed from the tank and refrigerated for a period of at least a month.

amphirion 12-20-2012 02:40 AM

i grow carnivorous plants. just a few things to consider:

be careful when mixing carnivorous plants in a riparium setting...there are a few things that need to be noted before taking this project on. first of all, not all carnivorous plants are capable of being placed into a riparium setting:

highland nepenthes, heliamphora and epiphytic utricularia: all of these need a night time temp drop down to the low 50s (40s if you can afford it) at night. furthermore, these plants require excellent drainage as they live off of cliffsides, or in trees--being waterlogged might not be the best thing for them.

temperate carnivorous plants: (dionaea, utricularia sp, pinguicula sp, sarracenia, drosera) the venus flytrap requires well drained media of about 60-70% sand and 40-30% peat. it does not like to be waterlogged and will rot over time. sarracenia can withstand waterlogged conditions provided that the rhizome stays above the waterline. temperate drosera and pinguicula can also withstand waterlogged conditions as well. however these plants will need to be placed along with high rate nutrient sucking plants and with fish that have a very light bio-load; the reason is because CPs come from acidic as well as nitrogen deficient environments (which is why they need to capture insects in the first place) and have adapted to live in such. a nitrogen rich environment will burn and rot the roots and eventually the entire plant will collapse. furthermore, they require a dormancy during the winter for long term cultivation.

cephalotus, the australian pitcher plant needs to be in elevated areas, and cannot be kept waterlogged unless the water is flushed with O2, and is moving. same with darlingtonia (plus dormancy since it's a temperate)

lowland nepenthes might be your best bet. Nepenthes mirabilis and ampullaria might be suitable for what you are attempting, but do keep in mind they get rather beastly, especially when they start to vine.

petiolaris drosera may also be a viable option. i've seen it done. but those are incredibly rare in the states and often will need to be imported from europe to acquire it.

another option is to have some sort of solid, impenetrable barrier between water and land, cover it up with rocks. that way you might be able to grow subtropical drosera, pinguicula, sarracenias, pretty much everything you'd want save those that need a temp drop at night.
best of luck....

PS: there's always UG and gibba. ;)

Wy Renegade 12-20-2012 04:14 PM

If you try that, be aware that water will leach over the top of the barrier through the rock via capillary action if the the rocks extend from sediment layer to sediment layer.

bbroush 06-09-2013 05:50 PM

Was anyone able to pull this off in a riparium? I'd love to see pictures.

Acro 06-09-2013 09:08 PM

I don't know of anyone who's tried it yet.
Step up bbroush and take on the challange!
:D

MMantelli 06-11-2013 01:48 AM

One of those mabey plants might get a chance to thrive in my riparium. Mabey we will see one day.

PunknDestroy 06-11-2013 02:05 AM

From my experience growing carnivorous plants many would not do well in a riparium. They are extremely prone to root burn from their soil having too much nitrogen. That's why they became carnivorous in the first place. The bogs and swamps they come from have very nutrient poor mediums.


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