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-   -   high nitrates... (http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=197347)

benjaminleebates 11-15-2012 12:14 AM

high nitrates...
 
I have a planted tank. I've been dosing the water colum with dry ferts mon,wed,fri. I do a 50% water change every saturday. I checked my nitrates today (wed) and they where @ 80-100 ppm. I haven't checked my levels in forever because I do a 50% every week. Should I be concerned? And what could cause this high of a level? All the other levels are great.

Rainer 11-15-2012 12:47 AM

That was my experience too. What substrate are you using?

I burned my nitrates down and am keeping them in the 10-20 ppm range for the sake of my shrimp and snails.

I later tested for PO4 - it was 10+ ppm. I'm burning that off too. Presumably K and traces were equally high.

Diana 11-15-2012 02:20 AM

If you have a heavily stocked tank, and are therefore adding a lot of fish food that could explain higher nitrates, especially when combined with EI dosing.

I would cut the EI dosing in half and run that for a week or two.

Are you maintaining this as a high tech set up? High light, CO2?
If not, then the lower dosing of the ferts might be just right.

benjaminleebates 11-15-2012 05:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diana (Post 2079084)
If you have a heavily stocked tank, and are therefore adding a lot of fish food that could explain higher nitrates, especially when combined with EI dosing.

I would cut the EI dosing in half and run that for a week or two.

Are you maintaining this as a high tech set up? High light, CO2?
If not, then the lower dosing of the ferts might be just right.

DIY co2, 4 - liter bottles, one changed out every week with a ceramic diffuser. Lights; two T8 - 24 inch 6700 K and one 24 inch T5HO 6500K.
36 Gallon tank. It is stocked well. Can the frequency of changing the filter effected water parameters?

Diana 11-15-2012 11:39 PM

Depends on what you mean by changing the filter.

The filter MEDIA trap different things from the water, and you can add chemical media that can remove or add things to the water.

Mechanical media trap objects from leaves on down to dust, specifically including fish waste and fallen food. When these materials decompose they can produce ammonia, if they had any protein in them. Cleaning the filter media, rinsing this stuff off frequently will remove these decomposing materials from the tank system, so reduce the amount of ammonia produced. (See Biological filtration)

Biological filtration is usually thought of as the control of nitrogen, including ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. Mostly we think of it as a group of bacteria that remove ammonia (from any source, but most often fishes' gills and decomposing matter) and turn the ammonia into nitrite, then a second group that remove nitrite and turn it into nitrate.
If there is a lot of ammonia (high fish load, lots of fish food) then the net result is high nitrate. Keeping the media clean where these bacteria live (gently rinsing in water removed from the aquarium) will keep the bacteria healthy and thriving, and keep the channels open for the optimum water flow. Throwing away this sort of media will cause an ammonia spike, usually followed by a nitrite spike because the bacteria have been thrown away, but the ammonia sources keep on producing ammonia. As the bacteria recover their population the ammonia removing bacteria grow faster, the nitrite removing bacteria grow slower.

Chemical media used to remove things from the water:
Activated Carbon, Purigen, Zeolite and several *zorb sorts of media chemically bind certain things removing them from the water column. When these media are full you can remove them.
Some of these media can be rejuvenated, the toxins get removed, and the media reused. If you leave these in the filter some may release the stuff they had trapped, and trap something else.
Some cannot be rejuvenated by any process available in the home. Leaving this sort in the filter does not cause the things they trapped to be released.

Chemical media used to add things to the water:
Coral sand, oyster shell grit and related materials add minerals to the water. Peat moss and other organic matter add organic acids to the water. When you remove them from the filter they obviously quit adding stuff to the water.


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