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-   -   DIY PAR38 LED Track Light (http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=156963)

DogFish 12-06-2011 01:53 AM

DIY PAR38 LED Track Light
 
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DogFish 12-06-2011 02:10 AM

:fish::fish::fish::fish::fish:

Craigthor 12-06-2011 02:17 AM

Wish you had a par meter, I had thought about going this route with my 150 but not sure I could get the light I need to the bottom of the tank.

Craig

DogFish 12-06-2011 02:22 AM

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Naekuh 12-06-2011 04:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DogFish (Post 1623059)
I'm curious about the Par reading myself. I wonder if I could rent one somehow?

the thing is i can get lux meters... but not par meters...

:O

no one i know has a par meter.

DogFish 12-06-2011 04:17 AM

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Hoppy 12-06-2011 05:16 AM

You can use Lux meters for a reasonably accurate PAR reading: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/li...ml#post1603516 Of course this has to be used out in the air, not underwater, but it would tell you about how much PAR you will get in water too (about 10-20% more than in air).

DogFish 12-06-2011 12:49 PM

Hop

mistergreen 12-06-2011 02:32 PM

Be aware that a PAR meter will only read light wavelengths between 400 - 700 nm (around that). A lux meter will vary drastically depending on what photo resistor/diode it uses.

Hoppy 12-06-2011 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DogFish (Post 1623548)
Hoppy, thanks for the link.

It would be interesting to know for discussion & help others. For me it still comes down to how my plants will grow. Between the dimmer & the ability to raise the lights I should be able to dial it it fairly easy.

I got my minimalist look in a way that doesn't look like Aquarium lighting.

You certainly did that! I like that look, but I would probably use different "shades", most likely round ones. This is one more very nice way to light a tank using off the shelf hardware.

Quote:

Originally Posted by mistergreen (Post 1623630)
Be aware that a PAR meter will only read light wavelengths between 400 - 700 nm (around that). A lux meter will vary drastically depending on what photo resistor/diode it uses.

If we wanted to use a lux meter for a variety of different types of lighting, or for some array of LEDs with a mix of reds, blues, greens, etc. it would likely not be accurate enough. But, if we stick to cool white, neutral white, etc. LEDs, or 6500-10,000K fluorescent lights, or similar color temperature MH lights, it should do well enough for our purposes. We don't need extreme accuracy, and we don't even get that with a PAR meter. The Quantum meters aren't perfectly accurate for low light either. They read in whole digits only, so a reading of 10 micromols is only good to about +/- 1 micromol, or 10%, and errors in technique add still more inaccuracy.

I haven't tried using a lux meter yet, but that's something I hope to do later.

Naekuh 12-06-2011 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mistergreen (Post 1623630)
Be aware that a PAR meter will only read light wavelengths between 400 - 700 nm (around that). A lux meter will vary drastically depending on what photo resistor/diode it uses.

yup... which is why my friend said no go for the application i want.
I would get the other spectrum which arent needed inside the lux, and wouldnt represent anything.. minus how well the camera would take its picture at what flash setting

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hoppy (Post 1623749)

I haven't tried using a lux meter yet, but that's something I hope to do later.

Ohhhh if u figure out a way hoppy let me know..
My friend whose a professional photographer said he would totally loan me his lux meter. But as i said, he said it was pointless for what i wanted.
He knows what a par meter is, and said get a cheap par meter.

Problem tho, a Par meter costs 200 dollars!!! :eek5:
I still want my dual stage regulator b4 a Par meter. :)

mistergreen 12-06-2011 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Naekuh (Post 1623837)
Problem tho, a Par meter costs 200 dollars!!! :eek5:

More like $300+

aretreesfree 12-06-2011 08:10 PM

interested in seeing what this would look like set up with water. i've wondered if this is a good route, but for a long tank like a 55g would this not be ideal? what about a 40B? would one bulb be sufficient for a 40B low tech?

DogFish 12-06-2011 09:48 PM

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DogFish 12-06-2011 09:53 PM

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