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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-06-2013 12:30 PM
Kaduhn1 So stay away from any man made concrete paver type stone. I'm also going to be doing some stone landscaping this weekend so probably pick up some natural pavers to work with.
09-06-2013 04:12 AM
MarkM I found my slate at a garden shop. The slate is 3/4" thick, I have 2.5" of substrate and have the slate on the glass bottom. I found that I needed 11 pounds of weight to sink the wood while it was soaking, the slate is 19 pounds so the size was planned. I did a little research about slate in aquariums and it apparently is fine. My two screw heads do not stick out beyond the slate much but I put a piece of rubber mesh over top of the screws so they would not hit the glass, likely overkill.
09-05-2013 10:46 PM
lochaber counter sinking is probably the easiest - drill one hole to fit the shaft of the screw, and then switch to a larger bit to make room for the head.

I've used nylon screws, but you either have to use some sort of adhesive, drill the whole slightly too small (in the wood) and friction-fit, or tap the wood (I already had some, and this worked wonderfully). Most use stainless wood screws, which would be easier and work just as well

Stay away from anything like concrete/cement/etc., it will screw with your pH, GH, KH, dissolved solids, etc.

If you don't want to use a screw, use some type of epoxy, it's probably the best all-around adhesive. Epoxy creates a really strong bond, is great for porous items (like wood - superglue isn't great for porous items), can cure really quickly, it's inert/non-toxic, etc.

easiest place to get slate is the floor section - just get a loose tile at Home Depot/Lowes.

I put my slate completely on the bottom, and then cover it with substrate, so it's not really any different then the rest of the tank, and I don't have any issues with plants growing over it. This also means it's much less likely to shift, and will be more stable long-term, but it also means you have to plan it out from the beginning.
09-05-2013 09:46 PM
Kaduhn1 I'll try and use as small as piece of slate as possible.
09-05-2013 09:11 PM
RainSong The problem I have with using slate is that unless it is buried deep into the substrate, it is hard to grow plants around your driftwood.
09-05-2013 09:01 PM
Kaduhn1 The kind that refuses to sink apparently. Is that just landscaping slate? It won't do much to water parameters will it?
09-05-2013 04:51 PM
MarkM I have a large piece that refused to sink after soaking for two weeks. I bought a piece of slate, drilled two 1/4" holes in the slate, and ran 2 x 3" stainless screws through the slate into the wood. It sinks now and the substrate covers the slate.

09-05-2013 04:38 PM
Aquaticus Wow! What kind of wood is it? I've never boiled anything that didn't sink.
09-05-2013 04:16 PM
Kaduhn1 I boiled it for about an hour and let it soak in a bucket to get all the crap out of it for about 2 weeks and still floats like a champ. Maybe i'll try using a larger drill and to create a pocket for the head of the screw. Didn't really think of that. Slate is so soft it shouldn't be hard to do. And the piece is a large so zip ties would look bad judging by the number i would need to sink it.
Thanks guys
09-05-2013 03:45 PM
BulletToothBoris Problem solved.

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/sh...034&highlight=
09-05-2013 03:28 PM
JerSaint Flat head stainless steel screw, counter sunk into the stone,(drill 1/8" into the stone slightly larger than the head of the screw) so it wont touch the bottom of the tank. Or you could put a piece of egg crate below the rock to protect your glass.
09-05-2013 02:57 PM
Aquaticus Boil it for half an hour if you have a pot that it will fit in.
09-05-2013 12:53 PM
roadmaster
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaduhn1 View Post
I have a piece of driftwood that isn't going to sink. I know the easy easy is to get a landscaping stone and drill a hold and put a screw into the wood. But that would leave the screw head sticking up and possibly hitting the bottom of the tank. Which wouldn't be good. I was thinking of making a little form and using some quikrete that i have and putting some screws into the wood and sinking them into the quikrete. once the quickrete sets it should be permanent. So is quikrete safe? Obviously let it cure or is there another solution?

I would/have used,the screw with flat head.Ouikrete I believe may contain lime and or mortar which could influence water hardness.
Plastic Zip ties can sometimes work to hold rock to wood depending on the size of the wood/rock.
Can alway's just lay a rock on top of the wood till the wood stay's down on it's own.
09-05-2013 12:39 PM
Kaduhn1
how to sink driftwood

I have a piece of driftwood that isn't going to sink. I know the easy easy is to get a landscaping stone and drill a hold and put a screw into the wood. But that would leave the screw head sticking up and possibly hitting the bottom of the tank. Which wouldn't be good. I was thinking of making a little form and using some quikrete that i have and putting some screws into the wood and sinking them into the quikrete. once the quickrete sets it should be permanent. So is quikrete safe? Obviously let it cure or is there another solution?

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